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View Poll Results: Which string slips out of tune the most?
Low E 11 12.94%
A 0 0%
D 1 1.18%
G 29 34.12%
B 40 47.06%
Hi E 4 4.71%
Voters: 85. You may not vote on this poll

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  #16  
Old 11-25-2012, 04:25 PM
Placida Placida is offline
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It's all about the G.
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  #17  
Old 11-25-2012, 04:46 PM
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"G" on my returned Les Paul....None on my Hummingbird or Taylor...
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  #18  
Old 11-25-2012, 06:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanPanther View Post
I don't understand the poll. 'G' is clearly winning, but no one has posted a word about the 'G' except me ?
Dan
Not sure. Could be that it's the wrapped string with the highest tension, so it's more prone? Just guessing.
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  #19  
Old 11-25-2012, 06:36 PM
cpeehler7 cpeehler7 is offline
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The 1st B string from the bottom on my 12 string. It always goes sharp on me! The worst part is, the more I play my 12 the more I notice when the pair is out of tune. Such an irritating cycle haha.
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  #20  
Old 11-25-2012, 07:17 PM
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Cool "You kids learn how to string your guitars!!!"

I put my low E---it doesn't sound right to me, unless I have it slightly flat. Probably because I press down on it the hardest, making it slightly sharp...

Despite Howard's admonition to us all, that we should all be perfect guitar stringers, I've never had a guitar that would stay in tune for more than an hour or two. Many have come close, but I guess I'm guilty of not being a good stringer...and here I've always blamed it on my ears, or the guitar, or the humidity, or the way I hold my tongue out, when stringing...

Shall I abandon the ritualistic candle, when stringing my guitar, too?
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  #21  
Old 11-25-2012, 10:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Howard Emerson View Post
Bogus poll.

You did not list the option 'None'.

I don't have any problems with any strings slipping, and neither should any of you who have, minimally, played for a couple of years with even a rudimentary instrument.

Learning how to properly 'set' a new string at both ends, or re-tuned string(s) when going into a different tuning, etc, is basic guitar knowledge.

Given the amount of available knowledge via the many threads that have focused on strings, tuning pegs, bridge pins and electric tuners on this forum, in particular, is all the more reason for these 'problems' to barely exist.

HE
Not sure if one can generalize, Howard. It seems that, according to the poll, most people have problems with their G & B strings.
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Last edited by Bern; 11-26-2012 at 05:49 AM.
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  #22  
Old 11-26-2012, 01:31 AM
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The one that slips out of tune the most is likely the one you're bending the most or hitting the most with other techniques. For me, that would be a B or G string most of the time but I tune up and into other tunings often so I don't really notice much if any string is going out more than others. I think that most good guitars hold tune really well and this isn't usually a problem with good gear. Stretching strings when you put them on helps negate this as well.
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  #23  
Old 11-29-2012, 01:40 AM
guitar344 guitar344 is offline
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Default B and Hi E

My B and Hi e string have been slipping out of tune lately.
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  #24  
Old 11-29-2012, 02:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Howard Emerson View Post
Bogus poll.

You did not list the option 'None'.

I don't have any problems with any strings slipping, and neither should any of you who have, minimally, played for a couple of years with even a rudimentary instrument.

Learning how to properly 'set' a new string at both ends, or re-tuned string(s) when going into a different tuning, etc, is basic guitar knowledge.

Given the amount of available knowledge via the many threads that have focused on strings, tuning pegs, bridge pins and electric tuners on this forum, in particular, is all the more reason for these 'problems' to barely exist.

HE
Wow. Howard clearly not impressed!

G for me. All my guitars whether it be acoustic flat or slot. Even on occurs on my tele.

So there you go!
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  #25  
Old 11-29-2012, 02:35 AM
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B followed by high E on every guitar I've ever owned.
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  #26  
Old 11-29-2012, 03:05 AM
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If strings are fitted and anchored correctly and the correct amount of pre-stretching performed, then bending strings or playing them hard are not the real culprits for them to go out of tune. The main culprits are:

1) Poorly cut nut slots (width, depth, shape, angle in two plains)
2) Nut slots not lubricated with dry graphite powder - makes a major difference!
3) The fact that some strings travel sideways more than others after leaving the back of the nut, creating side pressure and stiction in the nut slot.

The design of most headstocks is such that the D and G strings are pulled off to one side more than the others and - as I say in (3) above - create more friction. Accordingly, my votes are equally for the D and G strings. But I cannot vote for two strings. But anyway, there you go.

PRS' headstock design (on its electrics at least) provides for a straight string pull and is demonstrably better in promoting easier 'string flow' through the nut. Conversely, headstocks that get appreciably wider at the top exacerbate stiction at the nut for the D and G strings.
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  #27  
Old 11-29-2012, 08:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanPanther View Post
"G". Also what I've noticed the 'G' will make a popping sound when tuned both up and de-tuning. On almost all of my guitars. What causes that ?
Dan
A rough spot on your nut. It's grabbing the string when you adjust. Have you noticed that when you tighten or loosen it may not initially make the adjustment but then it pops and then there is a change?
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  #28  
Old 11-29-2012, 08:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 000-18GE View Post
I agree with Howard here. None of my guitars have a string that "slips" out of tune. The only thing that slips out of tune is my vocal "string"
I tend to agree but if one string needs a slight adjustment from time to time it's the "B" string. Once I get my strings on, stretched and tuned I'm generally set. Maybe a tune here or there the first time or two I use it but after that I think the only reason I'm off is temperature change from location to location.
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  #29  
Old 11-29-2012, 08:36 AM
mdutr0 mdutr0 is offline
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Let's back up a second here.

What do ya'll mean by "slipping?"

If you mean that the string is actually - physically - sliding around the tuning post or something then Howard is absolutely right. IF that is happening then you haven't done a great job stringing the guitar in the first place. Properly done, the string will not move at the bridge or slip around the tuning post during playing or tuning.

If, on the other hand, you mean simply that "dang it, there's always this one string that just won't stay in tune!" then that's a different animal than "slipping" per se. There are lots of things that can lead to that problem - technique and so forth.

We should also keep in mind that perfect intonation is a physical impossibility on 99% (maybe 100%) of guitars that exist. I am no phyisicist but the way I understand it is this - the interaction of the layout of the frets and the saddle and the notes to which the guitar is tuned (assuming standard tuning at least) and the tension required to reach pitch make it to where some notes will always be flat or sharp or what have you. Other instruments, even wind instruments, have these oddities of intonation as well.

Edit: the fan-fret guitar exists as an attempt to create "perfect" intonation, in case anyone was wondering

You can compensate for it in some ways. The advent of the compensated saddle is an effort by builders to help correct the problem. I've even seen compensated nuts on guitars before. But you can't make it go away entirely. The player can compensate for it too, to a certain extent. For example, on my Larrivee dread any fretted note on the Low E string sounds sharp to me unless I tune the open string just a hair flat. That way an open Emaj chord sounds good and the basic bluegrass Gmaj doesn't sound like fingernails on a chalkboard.

I really don't think Howard intended to come across as snarky. But the use of the term "slipping" is frequently associated with improper stringing of a guitar rather than tuning/intonation issues per se.

Sorry for the wall 'o text.

Edit: And yeah, the B string drives me crazy sometimes.
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  #30  
Old 11-29-2012, 11:44 AM
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Guitars are imperfect creatures, and by their very nature will eventually vibrate themselves out of tune a bit. People have invented all kinds of things trying to remedy this ie. Locking nuts, roller nuts, fine tuners etc..

It seems no matter what, after plucking away at long thin strings over and over and over stringed instruments will find a way to go out of tune eventually.

If someone claims they can put on a set of strings "correctly," tune up their guitar and have it never slip out of tune they are either tone deaf, spewing egotistical dribble, or likely don't play for extended periods of time.

On the other hand if you have a string that is constantly going out of tune there are measures that can be taken to remedy the issue- and most of us know these measures.

The fact is- even guitars with locking nuts and fixed bridges with fine tuners (strung up perfectly) will slip out of tune if played enough. Some strings will slip out of tune faster than others for whaever the reason may be.

It's always the B and high E string for me on every guitar I've ever played- given the guitar was strung up properly and had no prevalent issues.
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