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  #16  
Old 08-05-2012, 06:07 AM
Dru Edwards Dru Edwards is offline
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Originally Posted by tennjed View Post
I have been for several years now. The only models I have had an opportunity to play have been the 200 series model and one 700 series model. The 700 was, quite frankly, one of the most unimpressive sounding nylon string guitars I have played. As far as the 200 series guitars go, it is a struggle laying out a grand for one. They are pretty, and they do not sound bad, but...................

Now that Martin is coming out with that 000c, it makes the purchase of a 200 series Taylor that much harder.

BTW, thanks for the response.
There are quite a few hybrid models on the market now so try some non-Taylor models as well. Taylor has alluded to building a classical guitar sometime in the future (and not just a hybrid nylon string). I would like a hybrid sometime in the future. I hope that when that time comes that I'm in a store/city where I can try a bunch of different manufacturers.

Do you have the option to play a bunch in SE Indiana? Perhaps close to Cincinnati?
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  #17  
Old 08-05-2012, 08:52 AM
john bange john bange is offline
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I have been following this thread for a while...I still bought a Taylor NS32-ce to play along side my Martin 000c-16sgtne. As I said earlier, it lacks some of the low end volume my Martin can produce but it has a loud and clear voice up the neck and is great to sing with.
Where if differs the most is it's string spacing at the bridge...nearly 1/4 less from E to E.
While the Martin is in no way a classical guitar, the Taylor is even farther away. The Taylor feels like a small bodied steel string with very soft action.

I am not sure what the fretboard/saddle radius is but it would seem to be greater than the Martin also.

If you spend a lot of time singing with your own guitar back-up, whether into a mic or not, either guitar works well. I prefer the Martin in front of a mic or the Taylor plugged in but switch them around and they are fine too.

The level of construction of both is equal as near as I can tell.

Both builders were clear as to the intended use of these crossover/hybrid guitars and I wouldn't expect to see either one at a Classical recital
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  #18  
Old 08-05-2012, 09:52 AM
lodi_55 lodi_55 is offline
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Originally Posted by jimmy bookout View Post
Not at all. I have heard concert classicals that were absolute CANNONS but tonally, they were not pleasant.

"Tone" is SO subjective, that said, put me in the camp that the Taylor Nylons are not that good, acoustically (I am speaking of the old NS series). I had a NS62 for a couple of years, and it was merely OK (my Parlor classical absolutely blew it away, tonally). I don't know about the new ones (are they braced differently than the old NS guitars?)

Another thing I'm curious about is the pickup being used in the new Taylor Nylons. My NS62 had a Fishman UST/Mic combo, the new ones have a Taylor system which I think is just an UST. Anyone have one of the new ones and how does it sound plugged in?

Jimmy
There has been a lot of discussion here about the NS line. Mi would just suggest for those of you who haven't tried the new Taylor nylons (mine is a 714), you should try one..Speaking of the new ES, I play at pretty packed wine bars (150-200 people) and the sound is great. No feedback, no boomy A or E, no quackiness.
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  #19  
Old 08-05-2012, 07:20 PM
maplebaby maplebaby is offline
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"Plugged in, it outshines every guitar I've owned and as someone who plays live. 2-3 times a week, that's exactly what I was looking for"

"In fairness, Taylor was very upfront about the NS series NOT being classical guitars, they would not sound like them, etc."

these two quotes...from different posters...sum up exactly where i am on these guitars. I'm fortunate to have a 914c-N...i am NOT a classical guitarist, but play steel string and electric and want a nylon sound for some things i need in the different contexts i play - the guitar is perfect for what i need. I never expected it to compare/compete with a 'classical' guitar.

thanks for these posts gentlemen - for me they say it all.

dale
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  #20  
Old 08-06-2012, 07:32 PM
old iron rider old iron rider is offline
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Originally Posted by lodi_55 View Post
I don't agree about the weak tone but of course it's all very subjective. I would say thst unplugged it's a tight sound (although my low E is a monster) that would not appeal to everyone. Plugged in, it outshines every guitar I've owned and as someone who plays live. 2-3 times a week, that's exactly what I was looking for
I agree. I own an NS32ce, an early one. Walked into my local music store, and the guy tells me "you gotta try the new Taylor nylon. These guys knew how picky I am about nylons. I played on it about 5 minutes, unplugged, and liked the sound, the thinner neck, the cutaway, and just how it felt in my playing position. AND THEN........................we plugged into a Roland acoustic amp. My gosh! About an hour later..............................the guy comes in and says," it'll be a used guitar by the time you're done." Then he handed me some nice headphones and left me alone again. It sounded like a CD. Only it was me. I bought that guitar, and that amp on the spot. I own Larivees and quite a few Yairi's, and I love them too. But the Taylor just seems to have it down for a great all round guitar. As for playing gigs, its got them beat hands down.
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  #21  
Old 08-08-2012, 06:13 PM
kazzelectro kazzelectro is offline
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"In fairness, Taylor was very upfront about the NS series NOT being classical guitars, they would not sound like them, etc."

We hear this comment over and over again...not only do their nylon string guitars not sound like classical guitars, but also Taylor steel string guitars don't sound like traditional steel string guitars ...their sound is defined as being 'modern'. It seems to me that Taylor spends a lot of time justifying the way their guitars sound.
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  #22  
Old 08-09-2012, 12:33 PM
lodi_55 lodi_55 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kazzelectro View Post
"In fairness, Taylor was very upfront about the NS series NOT being classical guitars, they would not sound like them, etc."

We hear this comment over and over again...not only do their nylon string guitars not sound like classical guitars, but also Taylor steel string guitars don't sound like traditional steel string guitars ...their sound is defined as being 'modern'. It seems to me that Taylor spends a lot of time justifying the way their guitars sound.
Come on..."nylon" does not equal classical. Taylor is being creative and I applaud them for that. If I wanted "traditional" sounding guitars, there are many,many guitars that can deliver that...not interested.
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  #23  
Old 08-09-2012, 01:07 PM
AronW AronW is offline
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I've got a Taylor NS32c. I ordered it without the pickup system. It sounds completely different than the same model with a pickup. A friend of mine has the same model with ES. We both use Hannabach 815HT strings. And my guitar sounds much bigger, and has a much better tone.

He ended up selling his, and is planning on ordering one without the pickup. The pickup must stop the top from moving as much as it could.

I love my Taylor Nylon, it's one of my guitars that I'll never sell.
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  #24  
Old 08-10-2012, 09:45 AM
jimmy bookout jimmy bookout is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AronW View Post
I've got a Taylor NS32c. I ordered it without the pickup system. It sounds completely different than the same model with a pickup. A friend of mine has the same model with ES. We both use Hannabach 815HT strings. And my guitar sounds much bigger, and has a much better tone.

He ended up selling his, and is planning on ordering one without the pickup. The pickup must stop the top from moving as much as it could.

I love my Taylor Nylon, it's one of my guitars that I'll never sell.
IMHO, the differences in the 2 guitars would be more of a manufacturing/wood selection deal than an undersaddle pickup making that much difference tonally. I could be dead wrong.

Jimmy
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  #25  
Old 08-12-2012, 07:20 PM
tennjed tennjed is offline
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Well, I finally had an opportunity to play, briefly, one of the 000c Martins last week. From feel and tone quality standpoint, the only significant difference, in my inexperienced opinion, is the fact the Martin is a 12 fret. If I go with a crossover, I think I will go with the 200 series Taylor.

OBTW, I will not be buying either in the near future; I stumbled across a Cordoba C5 CET that I liked better than both the Taylor or Martin. The tone of the Cordoba is not a rich (it is a thinline guitar,) but the wider nut made it easier for me to fall in love and part with my cash.
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  #26  
Old 08-13-2012, 06:28 AM
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Gutch Gutch is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kazzelectro View Post
"In fairness, Taylor was very upfront about the NS series NOT being classical guitars, they would not sound like them, etc."

We hear this comment over and over again...not only do their nylon string guitars not sound like classical guitars, but also Taylor steel string guitars don't sound like traditional steel string guitars ...their sound is defined as being 'modern'. It seems to me that Taylor spends a lot of time justifying the way their guitars sound.
That's because there are people stuck in the past that believe for a guitar to sound good, it has to be a Martin. Flawed logic demands correction.
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  #27  
Old 08-13-2012, 08:23 AM
john bange john bange is offline
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Originally Posted by Gutch View Post
That's because there are people stuck in the past that believe for a guitar to sound good, it has to be a Martin. Flawed logic demands correction.
Gutch is right. I like both of my guitars very much...two different voices, for sure...I have no excuses to make for the sound of either..."few months later", I did get tired making excuses and sold the Taylor...tried lot of different strings but could not get much out of it. It compared poorly to my Martin
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Last edited by john bange; 03-03-2013 at 08:08 AM. Reason: sold Taylor
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  #28  
Old 08-13-2012, 08:48 AM
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mikealpine mikealpine is offline
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I bought a Taylor 214N because I wanted a nylon that felt more like my Taylor steel string. It sounds good and fit with what I wanted. Of course after the purchase I find I don't play it and wish I had gotten a GS Mini, but that's another story (and not because I don't like the guitar).

Anyway, it is a good guitar, certainly good for what it is, and as was pointed out, not meant to be a classical guitar. I wanted that Jason Mraz/Zac Brown sound and it definitely has that.

Good day all,
Mike
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  #29  
Old 03-02-2013, 06:31 PM
kazzelectro kazzelectro is offline
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Originally Posted by Gutch View Post
That's because there are people stuck in the past that believe for a guitar to sound good, it has to be a Martin. Flawed logic demands correction.
You've got it all wrong. Taylor needs to explain the way their guitars are made and they explain the way their guitars sound. They need to sell their story to compensate for the mass production techniques they employ and the resultant sound (or lack there of).

Last edited by kazzelectro; 03-02-2013 at 09:58 PM.
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  #30  
Old 03-04-2013, 07:08 PM
lodi_55 lodi_55 is offline
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Originally Posted by kazzelectro View Post
You've got it all wrong. Taylor needs to explain the way their guitars are made and they explain the way their guitars sound. They need to sell their story to compensate for the mass production techniques they employ and the resultant sound (or lack there of).
Wow..you cast a very wide net but don't give very much in the way of specifics. Feel free to elaborate. As a gigging musician with no particular brand loyalty, I respect Taylor guitars work and the tone of many of their guitars. I gig with a 714 Nylon right now and am very happy with it. So what exactly does Taylor "need" to explain?
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