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  #1  
Old 12-02-2019, 04:29 PM
RickRS RickRS is offline
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Default Beginning teacher

I'm going to attempt to teach guitar to a individual or two.

I've had a former co-worker asked about learning to play. He has already picked up a guitar and was frustrated with figuring out where to start. Seems he has learned a few chords that he can play very haltingly. He wanted to get a few pointers from me, and thinks my playing, which is predominately rhythm guitar, is impressive. So I offered to do some weekly lessons.

As a way to have a structured approach, I'm thinking of using Mel Bay's Modern Guitar Method books, which I used myself when I took formal lessons decades ago. I think the simple melodies in the early Mel Bay stuff will give him something to work on that aids development of his dexterity, and the Modern Guitar Method promotes a music theory background to aid in understanding where the more advance stuff come from when he gets to that point.

Adding to that, we can take his mixed bag of chords he has started with and work on playing rhythm at the same time for what pop and country songs he's interested in. Mel Bay starts with key of C, and learning the F chord somewhere in the middle of Book 1 is a killer for most beginners. So the supplemental chords work that I'm planning to include outside the Mel Bay book will start with key of G, because he already picked up G,C, and D. I figured go with what he started, and the progression thru Modern Guitar Method will introduce the C,F,G7 chords just as he has figured out how to get thro a G,C,D7 progression

Any thought of the plan, or tips or thoughts about what I'm going to attempt?
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Old 12-02-2019, 06:54 PM
Brooklyn Bob Brooklyn Bob is offline
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My lessons are 45 minutes. I use Hal Leonard books but Mel Bay is fine. I spend the first 15-20 minutes in the book because I think being able to read is an asset. At that point I'll say "What would you like to learn to play now?".

I keep a tablet right there and am not embarrassed to search youtube or wherever for songs. I like for my students to leave feeling good and wanting to come back next week.
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Old 12-03-2019, 05:46 AM
RickRS RickRS is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brooklyn Bob View Post
My lessons are 45 minutes. I use Hal Leonard books but Mel Bay is fine. I spend the first 15-20 minutes in the book because I think being able to read is an asset. At that point I'll say "What would you like to learn to play now?".

I keep a tablet right there and am not embarrassed to search youtube or wherever for songs. I like for my students to leave feeling good and wanting to come back next week.
Sounds like the same thoughts I have on what to do. Everybody wants to be excited about what they are learning. The trick I think will be finding what will excite the beginner and not be overwhelming beyond their skills.

I'm excited about the opportunity because trying to teach focuses me on recognizing what I really know and drives my own understanding of music up a notch.
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Old 12-03-2019, 07:06 AM
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fazool fazool is offline
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Don't overthink the lesson and music theory education.

Jumping into the concept of "teaching chords in the key of C", etcetera is a recipe for failure.

99% of the people just want to have some fun and play some songs - they don't give a rip about music theory....at least not yet.

The 1% who do care, will be looking for professional teachers and planning on studying music in college.

Look up Steve Stine videos on Youtube. Phenomenal hard rock/metal guitarist who also happens to have the best attitude about teaching guitar that I've ever seen. his entire premise is to make is fun, there is no right or wrong, music is supposed to be fun so just do what's fun.

Keep that approach in mind.

You will, in my opinion, have much better success by teaching him to play a simple song on day one. He will go home amazed and happy that he can play a song. That boosts self confidence, entertains and provides the "hook" that most people need to keep learning. That's why most are there.

The voracious desire for theory comes after getting hooked on playing music and wanting to take it to the next level....not vice-versa.

If he goes home thinking "great.....I spent hours learning what chords come in what order but I still can't make any music" his interest in guitar will wane quickly.
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Old 12-04-2019, 03:23 AM
6twenty7 6twenty7 is offline
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Teach songs...
when I started with my friend last year we took classes at a local guitar center. The guy taught us how to make the common chords and do scales, but we were frustrated because it took like 3 weeks for us to get to the part where we got to play something. On top of that it was like 4-6 bars of Green Day haha.

Grab easy songs and teach them the chords in the process.
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