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  #16  
Old 09-25-2023, 03:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Rootwitch View Post
Looks like it was actually a 1940. This one: https://www.picknparlor.com/acoustic...40-martin-d-28
1940 is a great year for "pre war spec" D-28s - rear bracing (usually has incredible mids and trebles) but still has the T bar from the 30s/Golden Era serials. You played a special guitar!
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  #17  
Old 09-25-2023, 10:53 PM
sinistral sinistral is online now
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Originally Posted by Racerbob View Post
So when does a used guitar cross over from worth less than the new price cause it's used to being worth more than a new one of the same model by a whole bunch. When does "used" so worth less become "vintage" so worth way more now it's no longer just a well used guitar.
I’m no expert, but at least with respect to Martins, there are several inflection points that drive up (or down, as the case may be) for guitars of different eras. The other factor is supply or, more appropriately, scarcity. The most sought after guitars tend to be the larger sizes (00, 000, OM, Dreadnought) from the 1930’s and early 1940s. Martin introduced its first 14-fret guitar with the Orchestra Model in 1929. Martin only made a handful of OM-45s, and I’ve seen a couple sell for north of $500k. From what I’ve seen, it’s typically only Dreadnoughts from 1934 to early 1942 that command prices significantly higher than $100k. By the mid-40s, Martin has stopped scalloping braces, and ran out of red spruce, so switched to sitka spruce. While the prices drop off, they are still well into the double digits.

The 1960s saw a number of changes that tend to take their toll on prices—Martin moved production from the old factory to the new factory, they stopped using hide glue, and they ran out of Brazilian rosewood. Even so, prices of guitars from the 1960s in good condition sell for multiples of a new equivalent model. The 1970s is probably where the crossover occurs. While some guitars from the 1970s (and later) sell for more than a new equivalent model, many sell at a discount. Part of the issue is supply—Martin’s production ramped up, so there are just a lot more of these guitars floating around. It also doesn’t help that Martin had production issues, which resulted in the bridges on Dreadnoughts being in the wrong place—a fixable issue, but it seems to hang over values like a cloud. Martin also switched the bridgeplates from maple to oversized rosewood.

Another factor that suppresses values from the 1970s and later decades relative to new guitars is that Martin reimagined the Standard Series (beginning unofficially with the Style 18 guitars on 2012 and the rest of the line in 2018), so newer guitars are closer in some construction details to their pre-war counterparts.
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  #18  
Old 09-25-2023, 11:38 PM
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Iím a vintage person. I enjoy guitars from 1927-2019 in my music room, but my 1936 000-18 is my definition of the holy grail.
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  #19  
Old 09-26-2023, 01:08 PM
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Originally Posted by NickZag View Post
There is a 1940 D-28 at Gryphon Strings in Palo Alto. I havenít touched it for fear Iíd be ruined
Same here. I don't want to know. Every Martin I've played, 1918 to 1940 has been exciting. Maybe not the guitars for my style, at least the 0 and 00s I might be able to afford, but for a finger stylist, a 20s 00 would be the ticket. We all know 30s 000s and dreads are the gold standard.

A 40s LG2 is a captivating guitar, but the best guitar I've played was a 39 J 35.
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  #20  
Old 09-26-2023, 06:01 PM
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I've only played one. 1938 Martin 000-28 as I recall. At a store in St Louis. I played it for 60 seconds and handed it back to the clerk. It was glorious. It was also $50,000.
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  #21  
Old 09-26-2023, 06:17 PM
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There’s a ‘30s 000-28 at Dream Guitars. Even over the Internet I can tell it has a tone I would liquidate my collection for. And, I still wouldn’t have enough money for it.
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  #22  
Old 09-26-2023, 07:08 PM
TJNies TJNies is offline
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For me, making the leap to my 1944 00-18 changed my whole mindset about vintage guitars.
I'd owned several fantastic custom shop Martins, usually with highest-level appointments (hide glue, premium woods, pearl, etc). They all were excellent guitars, but for some reason didn't stick with me. Mostly IMO due to that ubiquitous MLO neck, which I realize I hate.

But on others advice and persuasion, I took a chance at the 00-18; it has a sound that nothing I'd ever tried could match. "Dry" to me, was described to many vintage Martins, was dull. This is nothing of the sort; "alive" is a better descriptor.

I recently started thinking I should sell the 44, as 1) I don't play that much, 2) I'm not that good 3) no friends play 4) I don't play out. And I could make a pretty fair profit, given the current nutso market for that era Martin. I changed strings and realized I was an idiot to even thing about selling; it's staying.
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  #23  
Old 09-27-2023, 05:47 AM
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Start saving your money. Personally, I am careful to not audition guitars that are outside my comfort zone for spending - there is no guarantee I wouldn't just go there anyway.
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  #24  
Old 09-27-2023, 06:47 AM
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Originally Posted by musicman1951 View Post
Start saving your money. Personally, I am careful to not audition guitars that are outside my comfort zone for spending - there is no guarantee I wouldn't just go there anyway.
For me itís less about temptation and more about understanding what the fuss is about. When you play a Martin or Gibson from the 1930s or 1940s, it gives you a benchmark for tone and feel. How else can one tell how close a Martin Authentic or Pre-War Guitars Co. [or fill-in-the-blank-solo-luthier] guitar sounds like an original if youíve never played an original? The same goes for Gibsons, Larson Bros., original Stellas, Recording Kings, etc.
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  #25  
Old 09-27-2023, 07:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Rootwitch View Post
I was in Denver this past week for work, and I stopped by the Pickin' Parlor on a day off. They had some vintage Martins, and one in particular from the 30s that cost about 70K but the owner was kind enough to let me play it. I swear, I could have sat there just playing the 12th fret e for an hour, it sang so beautifully. Now I'm afraid that I'm ruined for anyting else.

What guitars have ruined you?
I've got some old instruments - my grandfather's 1880's German trade fiddle, a 1930's Regal resonator mandolin and 1930's Stahl banjolin and a '46 Kay bass. My dad had a 40's Martin classical guitar (my sister has it now). I've played friend's 40's Martins and Gibson dreads. The older instruments can be wonderful.

None of these leave me thinking any less of my newer instruments though. Nothing has "ruined" my appreciation for them. But I've played some really exquisite custom builds at festivals like Wintergrass - last February I played an Irvin that may be the best sounding guitar I've ever heard in person, new or old. But I'm still not ruined.
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  #26  
Old 09-27-2023, 12:43 PM
Gordon Currie Gordon Currie is offline
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Originally Posted by Mandobart View Post
But I've played some really exquisite custom builds at festivals like Wintergrass - last February I played an Irvin that may be the best sounding guitar I've ever heard in person, new or old. But I'm still not ruined.
Wayne Johnson (Irvin) is making some spectacular instruments these days!

My 2 Irvins are so suited to my playing that I can't conceive of ever playing something that 'ruins' them.

And, conversely, they didn't 'ruin' my enjoyment of my 1978 Larrivee.

I'm not a proponent of the 'one guitar to rule them all' approach. Each of my main guitars has a distinctive voice and strengths.

I have an old friend who used to play a 1942 00-42 Martin. The sweetest Martin I've ever played - but there is a universe of music that it could not produce.
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  #27  
Old 09-27-2023, 12:55 PM
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I was in Denver last week as well. Stopped in a GC there was nothing cool like that there, just the usual modern Taylorís Martins and Gibson all under lock and key. I looked around for a minute then left. I had fun at Red Rocks and the early Octoberfeast though.
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  #28  
Old 09-27-2023, 01:13 PM
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Smile Tim Lurancís 1918 OOO-28

Tim’s 1918 000 Brazilian/Adirondack 12 fret knocks me OUT

It was a garage find with a broken neck. In the 70s….

This instrument was actually the inspiration and template for Taylor’s Grand Concert. Bob T borrowed it to scope out.

Although Larry Breedlove did eventually massage the GC shape a bit.

Amazing tone on a 105 YO piece of history

Even with its Martin replacement neck! 1 7/8” nut and Slim V…

Tim says if the house is on fire this one gets grabbed

Oh, the fun of guitars

Paul
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  #29  
Old 09-27-2023, 04:29 PM
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So thatís where they all went.
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  #30  
Old 09-27-2023, 05:24 PM
Scoobtay Scoobtay is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bridgepin View Post
I believe that one has been there for a little while and to be honest it was not as good as others I have played. IMO
Good gravy it's also covered in belt rash, cracked, and they are asking 111 big ones for it.
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