The Acoustic Guitar Forum

Go Back   The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > Build and Repair

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 01-20-2017, 12:31 PM
AcousticAmber AcousticAmber is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 59
Default Taylor neck crack

I just bought this Taylor 114e on eBay, it has two broken tuners and this neck crack.


https://www.flickr.com/photos/147703...posted-public/

I'm no stranger to crack repairs, including neck crack repairs, but I've never repaired a crack like this before. I'm used to neck cracks that extend from the nut, down the neck (usually on both sides). In which case I'd CAREFULLY pry open the crack, inject watered down glue followed by straight glue. Then clamp the crack closed, and let dry.
This crack however, is only on one side of the neck and is not flush. I can't think of a way to open this crack to get glue into it (without causing further damage) and I'm thinking it will be difficult to clamp flush after I get glue into it.
Would it be a ridiculous thought to drill some TINY holes directly over the crack to inject glue into? If not, how else could I get glue into it?
And since its not a 'uniform' crack, what would be the best way to get it looking as invisible as possible after its been glued?

Any advice appreciated, thanks all.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-20-2017, 12:38 PM
fazool's Avatar
fazool fazool is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Buffalo, NY
Posts: 15,946
Default

I would not use a "watered down glue".

I would first make sure clamping tightly closes the crack. If so, then I would use a low viscosity CA and clamp closed - that looks like an easy crack to fix.

I would not drill any holes.
__________________
Fazool "The wand chooses the wizard, Mr. Potter"

Taylor: GC7 / 322 / GA3-12 / SB2-C / SB2-C (piezo) , Sterling:CT50, Godin:A12
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-20-2017, 12:51 PM
redir redir is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Mountains of Virginia
Posts: 6,800
Default

Thin CA will wick into almost anything. So much so in fact that you have to be really careful. IIRC you can thin Titebond up to 10%. That would probably get in there too if you can flex it and get some movement in the crack.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-20-2017, 12:59 PM
jrmyrnsm jrmyrnsm is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: East TN
Posts: 590
Default

I was watching that auction too I agree with Fazool, I think I would do some thing CA glue and clamp it tight
__________________
Jeremiah

Current Guitars:
1986 Petros Spruce/Rosewood Dread (for sale)
1997 Taylor 514c

My photography website
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-20-2017, 06:54 PM
mirwa mirwa is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 2,999
Default

I would consider doing a back strap repair on that one.

Give the glue a go as referenced above, but I suspect it's not going to hold only because of the crack angle, it appears to be cross grain at locations.

Steve
__________________
Cole Clark Fat Lady
Gretsch Electromatic
Martin CEO7
Maton Messiah
Taylor 814CE
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-23-2017, 12:04 PM
tdnate tdnate is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 4
Default

If the cracks goes all the way through you might try the vacuum trick. Apply glue to the surface and let the vacuum pull it into the crack from the other side.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-23-2017, 03:04 PM
Frank Ford's Avatar
Frank Ford Frank Ford is offline
AGF Sponsor
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Palo Alto, CA
Posts: 638
Default

On that one I'd leak in as much thin CA as it wants to drink, followed by some medium viscosity. Clamp it up and it should be fine. I'd expect no problem with stability because of the angle of the crack. First, I'd verify that I could get good cleanup with acetone, of course. . .
__________________
Cheers,

Frank Ford
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-23-2017, 04:15 PM
AcousticAmber AcousticAmber is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 59
Default

Thanks for the advice everyone I'll try the thin CA. Still not sure how to get the best clamp, its a really awkward angle. I'll figure something out.

But I just received the guitar today and I noticed there are actually more cracks. Not sure what actually happened to it.

There is a crack from the nut down the neck:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/147703...posted-public/

And two cracks on the face of the headstock. However these are very minor and I'm wondering if they're just through the veneer or through the headstock as well:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/147703...posted-public/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/147703...posted-public/

None of these newly discovered cracks line up directly with the original one, but I'm wondering if the whole headstock is structurally compromised now.. Thoughts?
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-23-2017, 06:32 PM
John Arnold John Arnold is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 3,625
Default

The one from the nut down the neck under the fingerboard is the result of force opposite the string pull. It often occurs when the guitar is shipped with no string tension, coupled with heavy enclosed tuners. Since string tension will tend to close it, it is IMHO the least serious type of headstock crack.
I see no reason for concern about headstock stability once the cracks are glued. I would also use thin CA on this particular repair.
Reply With Quote
Reply

  The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > Build and Repair

Tags
advice, crack, neck, repair, taylor

Thread Tools





All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, The Acoustic Guitar Forum
vB Ad Management by =RedTyger=