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  #46  
Old 02-25-2010, 04:43 PM
KittyLitter KittyLitter is offline
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Originally Posted by Guyute View Post
I just don't like the idea of using a tool that could seriously burn my jackhole. There's got to be a more natural method that's less hazardous. I'm allergic to ginger root, thought. Does powdered ginger have the same effect if you mix it with water?

Powered Ginger Root mixed with water might work, but I wouldn't want to risk having liquid run out my jackhole in the middle of playing in front of 20 people........ talk about embarrassment.
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  #47  
Old 02-25-2010, 04:51 PM
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This thread is as fun as the one on how not to remove the pick guard but not as much fun as the thread on how to convert a Venetian cutaway into a Florentine cutaway.
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  #48  
Old 02-25-2010, 05:10 PM
ironman187 ironman187 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Guyute View Post
I just don't like the idea of using a tool that could seriously burn my jackhole. There's got to be a more natural method that's less hazardous. I'm allergic to ginger root, thought. Does powdered ginger have the same effect if you mix it with water?
If you use a wet rag and lightly touch inside the hole till you hear a sizzle, then pull it out immediately, you will not burn anything. You are basically steaming the wood. A lot of luthiers use this very same method on dents and dings on the top of the guitar, and a TON of wood workers use a similar method on dents in wood furniture.

@ TT You would be waiting quite a while for that soldering iron to heat up.
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  #49  
Old 02-25-2010, 06:04 PM
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I'm not sure I understand the powdered ginger connection. Does it act as a catalyst or lubricant?
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  #50  
Old 02-25-2010, 06:14 PM
ironman187 ironman187 is offline
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Originally Posted by SteveS View Post
This thread is as fun as the one on how not to remove the pick guard but not as much fun as the thread on how to convert a Venetian cutaway into a Florentine cutaway.
Link please!
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  #51  
Old 02-25-2010, 06:39 PM
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I think you you rub it fast enough, you might come up with a solution.
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  #52  
Old 02-25-2010, 06:51 PM
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I'm not sure I understand the powdered ginger connection. Does it act as a catalyst or lubricant?
Yes, it does.
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  #53  
Old 02-25-2010, 07:49 PM
JamBermuda JamBermuda is offline
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I'd be worried that I'd never get the jack off again after using the ginger. The soldering iron in the end pin hole is the way to go... very effective, but not for the feint of heart.
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  #54  
Old 02-25-2010, 09:49 PM
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Link please!
I looked but could not find it. There were lots of helpful hints and one poor soul that just did not get that it was a joke and kept pleading for the OP not to try it.
It was in open mic, so I think it just went off to electron oblivian. What a shame. I'm going to have a moment of silence. Please join me.
Maybe I should just start another one.
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  #55  
Old 02-25-2010, 10:17 PM
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Does it serve any purpose other than holding the strap on?
It certainly does...

It helps protect your guitar when you stand it up against the wall...

It sits on the strap knob and stops it from scratching the bottom of the guitar....It works too....

I've personally damaged dozens of guitars using this method,but not one of

them has had any damage to the strap on end pin..

One way to repair the plug is to take it out of the body and screw a thread on the end of it,then you can put it back in ,and by using two nuts (same size as the plug) you can reach inside the body and tighten up the nuts.

The second nut locks the first one in place..

Exercise caution if doing this method though,once,I got my whole arm stuck

in the body,and had to go to the E.R to have it removed..I suffered a few minor grazes,but I'm happy to say there was zero damage to the strap on pin..

Bat
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  #56  
Old 02-26-2010, 04:14 AM
TubeTone TubeTone is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Batman View Post
It certainly does...


Exercise caution if doing this method though,once,I got my whole arm stuck

Bat
No way I'd ever go elbow deep and risk getting stuck......
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  #57  
Old 02-26-2010, 06:30 AM
sligots sligots is offline
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I just don't know about the hot iron thing. With all the different approaches -hot, cold, wrapped, unwrapped, liquid or powder - risky!
I bet there are luthier associations, or woodworking groups that could offer some guidance. Maybe you could find a branch that would collaborate on the project. I am just concerned that if things are done without the proper training you might wind up with all these small circular scars that would then cause you to have to sand the box, or lead to even more complex sergury. Hard to believe but sometimes the simplest things turn into quite a mess.
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  #58  
Old 02-26-2010, 07:42 AM
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In my years as a boat builder I have found it is not uncommon to find the need to ream the hole to accommodate a larger bung plug...now, these bung plugs serve only one purpose....to fill the void.

I would assume the same is true for a guitar, no?

That said, once the sides of the bung hole have become worn and tattered the only recourse is to ream that baby out for a larger bung plug which can then be inserted with a minimum of upward driving force ..heat from friction alone will suffice to make a smooth insertion.

I have no idea what this ginger root thing is all about....a little spiddle works fine for me...call me "old fashioned"...
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  #59  
Old 02-26-2010, 08:20 AM
TubeTone TubeTone is offline
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I just got done checking mine and I noticed after years of playing with a strap on, I have discoloration around the end hole, probably caused by sweat and never cleaned properly. This isn't my main unit, rather it is my beater that I also let friends use, or who ever shows up so over the years it has seen a lot of action. I tried several kinds of cleaner, but nothing will touch the discoloration. I wonder if there is any kind of bleach especially made for removing stains in that area.
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  #60  
Old 02-26-2010, 08:40 AM
dthumb dthumb is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TubeTone View Post
I just got done checking mine and I noticed after years of playing with a strap on, I have discoloration around the end hole, probably caused by sweat and never cleaned properly. This isn't my main unit, rather it is my beater that I also let friends use, or who ever shows up so over the years it has seen a lot of action. I tried several kinds of cleaner, but nothing will touch the discoloration. I wonder if there is any kind of bleach especially made for removing stains in that area.
I use this :http://www.superfpaint.com/store/Woo...-products.html after reaming my bung holes to bring the surface back..I'm not so sure it wouldn't work with some of the darker stains around yours.

I think I'd test it out first, though.

The foaming, stinging action is normal...btw..
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