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  #91  
Old 06-17-2021, 08:40 PM
Glennwillow Glennwillow is online now
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Originally Posted by Haasome View Post
Interesting thoughts. Glenn, this article might not hit the bulls eye you intended in your OP, but reading this article today made me think about this thread. The title Tim Cook Just Explained a Brutal Truth About Failure That Most People Never Acknowledge, Success isn't the opposite of failure. It's often the result of failing the right way.

https://www.inc.com/jason-aten/tim-c...knowledge.html
Hi Paul,

Actually, this article is right in line with my thinking. Excellent article, too!

Thanks for this, Paul.

Regarding failure in a company, the creative people have to be set free to create and then by definition, fail at times. When you have a boss that blows up and castigates everyone for a failure -- something many of have seen, me included -- well then you know you are working for a company that really is not willing to take on the risks of being creative.

- Glenn
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  #92  
Old 06-17-2021, 08:43 PM
Glennwillow Glennwillow is online now
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Originally Posted by rollypolly View Post
lots of great advice here from people with way more experience than me. That's why I love this forum and finally joined a few weeks ago.

I can only add that I've learned to expect to suck at a new challenge, like a song for example, but after a few weeks of practicing for at least 1-2 hours at it, it starts to sound like something decent, then it becomes part of my repertoire and I know it was worth it. Also, don't be too hard on yourself, and enjoy the process.
Hi Rolly,

Thanks for your thoughts.

And you are absolutely correct about learning things on the guitar. You have to have the long view, to believe you can do it, to accept failure in the beginning as part of the process, knowing you will get there with time and practice.

And as you note, a player has to appreciate this process and understand it's all part of the joy of learning music.

Be well Rolly,

- Glenn
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  #93  
Old 06-17-2021, 08:46 PM
SongwriterFan SongwriterFan is offline
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I just accept that I'm going to fail (at playing and singing simultaneously, anyway) and try not to worry about it.

I worry more about not having good lyrics . . . probably because I think I'm actually better than the "average lyricist" (whatever that is).

I think we actually worry the most about things that we are really good at . . and that it's actually a good thing in that it helps us improve.
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  #94  
Old 06-17-2021, 08:49 PM
Glennwillow Glennwillow is online now
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Glen, I can really relate. For most of my life I was a horrible perfectionist and beat myself up needlessly for any mistakes I made. It ended up really squelching any creative output. Then, somehow, about ten years ago, I began letting go of that and really letting it rip. It really liberated me.

The best thing I ever read that helped me break free is a famous book by Natalie Goldberg about the writing process. Although it's mainly about writing prose, it helped me enormously in grad school and also helps my students when writing essays.

The book is called WRITING DOWN THE BONES, and the sequel WRITING FROM WILD MIND is very good also. These have both been out for more than 20 years, so you should be able to find a good used copy for cheap.

Break a Leg!
Scott Memmer
Hi Scott,

It's great to hear from you! I think of you every time I pick up one of your CL picks!

Interesting thoughts about being a perfectionist. I have known a few over the years.

Ironically, I never was a perfectionist. I had to learn to go the other way, to demand more of myself. I think my way is easier on a person, because in the beginning, I would do anything to be able to make music. I'd find ways to simplify chords or whatever, just so I could play that song I wanted to play.

Later, as I got better, I'd make myself go back and relearn stuff, to get better at it.

There are a lot of players who say that if you learn something wrong, it's permanent. I never found that. I found that I could change how I played something on the guitar even if I'd been doing it wrong for 50 years.

Perfectionism definitely makes it hard to move forward, because nothing ever is perfect. Of course you know that from making flat picks! (Not that I ever found anything wrong with one of your picks! )

Hope all is well for you Scott!

- Glenn
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  #95  
Old 06-17-2021, 08:56 PM
Glennwillow Glennwillow is online now
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Originally Posted by SongwriterFan View Post
I just accept that I'm going to fail (at playing and singing simultaneously, anyway) and try not to worry about it.

I worry more about not having good lyrics . . . probably because I think I'm actually better than the "average lyricist" (whatever that is).

I think we actually worry the most about things that we are really good at . . and that it's actually a good thing in that it helps us improve.
Hi SF,

Thanks for your thoughts here!

Yes, I think when it comes to making music with the guitar, the best thing any of us can do is plow ahead and try to figure out how to do it, whatever way it works for us.

I haven't written original music for decades. I think I was good at it back then, but it's hard work, and when it comes to hard work like that, I want to do that only if I'm getting paid. And since I have made no effort to make money with music for decades, songwriting has been off my list.

But I tip my hat to anyone who feels compelled to do it.

I keep thinking that I should sit down and write an albums worth of songs and do something substantial now that I'm retired, but, man! talking about facing a blank canvas.

I'm not sure I'm ready to face that. And in the end, who will it be for? Myself, I suppose.

- Glenn
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  #96  
Old 06-17-2021, 09:19 PM
SongwriterFan SongwriterFan is offline
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And in the end, who will it be for? Myself, I suppose.
Ultimately, that's who I'm doing it for. Myself.

I don't feel compelled to write one per week, or one per month, etc.

But if something hits me, I'll write it.

This is the last one I wrote by myself:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGCe3oaUy2c



The last one I wrote was actually a co-write with a "legit songwriter" (one who spends half his time in Nashville, with a publishing deal). The song idea was mine, and I managed to get in a few lines, but it was like drinking from a fire hose. I spent 8 hrs on his back porch writing it with him. Somewhat ironically, it's called "I Can't Write That Song". Which, of course, is different than I can't write THIS song (which really would be ironic).
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