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  #16  
Old 04-20-2022, 10:10 PM
CMStewart CMStewart is offline
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Originally Posted by BEJ View Post
Seems like you have chance to meet most of you conditions working with Steve and Ryan. Don't know the cost and how they select students. Living in Texas and their shop somewhat close not sure how you could find a better situation.

Good luck on your quest.

Bruce,
Thanks Bruce! I already contacted Ryan based on the advice of another member, and I just reserved a spot with them though, the closest opening is Fall of 2023, but still, it's going to be awesome. It's exactly what I was looking for (1 week to go through an entire build with some world-class luthiers). Also, they said I could come visit the shop anytime to chat, as long as I give a heads up beforehand.

So I really appreciate you and everyone giving me tips. I'm still going to do some other classes as well. Looks like this post has paid off.
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  #17  
Old 04-21-2022, 03:34 PM
phavriluk phavriluk is offline
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Default dreams can come true

I hope the experience turns out to be everything OP hoped for. Looks like his persistence came to a good result.
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  #18  
Old 04-21-2022, 10:01 PM
CMStewart CMStewart is offline
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I hope the experience turns out to be everything OP hoped for. Looks like his persistence came to a good result.
Thanks man... you all were a huge help. This forum is truly an amazing resource.
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  #19  
Old 04-22-2022, 05:37 AM
Rmouton Rmouton is offline
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Supercurio, I took a different path. I spent a week with Dave Nichols at Custom Pearl Inlay in Malone, NY, building a guitar under instruction. I have no idea how much of a trip that is for you, it was a day's road trip for me. I spent a week at a very comfortable bed&breakfast in Malone, NY. I learned an awful lot in that one week.
I too spent a week with Dave in Malone NY. It was a tremendous experience. I consulted with Dave often after that trip as I began to make guitars. I was also lucky enough to befriend his apprentice at the time, Adam Geraldson, who has become a good friend and guiding light in the world of lutherie. I'm 15 guitars in now and I'm starting to know what I'm doing.
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  #20  
Old 04-22-2022, 11:31 AM
BEJ BEJ is offline
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Originally Posted by Supercurio View Post
Thanks Bruce! I already contacted Ryan based on the advice of another member, and I just reserved a spot with them though, the closest opening is Fall of 2023, but still, it's going to be awesome. It's exactly what I was looking for (1 week to go through an entire build with some world-class luthiers). Also, they said I could come visit the shop anytime to chat, as long as I give a heads up beforehand.

So I really appreciate you and everyone giving me tips. I'm still going to do some other classes as well. Looks like this post has paid off.
Wow to be so lucky, would like to be in your shoes, if just to met two cool guys if nothing else. But throw in the guitar building too much.

You mentioned you could visit their shop, I would ask them what to do in the waiting period until your week with them. Keep building, improve your woodworking skills, seems like there should be a lot one could do to better use the time with them. I'm sure you have already done some of this.

The quest moves on.

Bruce,
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  #21  
Old 04-22-2022, 12:57 PM
tadol tadol is offline
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There is a group of luthiers out here that have a loose association called NCAL (Northern Cal Asso Luthiers) - we traditionally met at each others shops, but Covid kinda stopped that, and many of the luthiers involved have small shops that can’t really accommodate a couple dozen people easily, so we’ve been “meeting” via Zoom, usually a Sunday afternoon, with a variety of presenters, and a variety of topics. While it won’t get you an apprenticeship, it can get you in touch with other small and hobby level builders ( plus some world-respected masters ) that are generally happy to answer questions and help solve problems others are having. If you PM me I can get you in touch with the group -

You may have a similar group in your area - if not, there may just be a woodworking group that you can join. Any luthier who would want an apprentice is going to be much happier taking on someone who has good stationary tool experience, and solid hand-work and bench skills - especially layout and sharpening. You can build a really good foundation for luthiery just refining your fine woodworking skills -
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More than a few Santa Cruz’s, a few Sexauers, a Patterson, a Larrivee, a Cumpiano, and a Klepper!!
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  #22  
Old 04-23-2022, 09:50 PM
CMStewart CMStewart is offline
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Originally Posted by BEJ View Post
Wow to be so lucky, would like to be in your shoes, if just to met two cool guys if nothing else. But throw in the guitar building too much.

You mentioned you could visit their shop, I would ask them what to do in the waiting period until your week with them. Keep building, improve your woodworking skills, seems like there should be a lot one could do to better use the time with them. I'm sure you have already done some of this.

The quest moves on.

Bruce,
There are so many things I can work on right now, it's really just carving out the time to do them. But that's a really great point -- what things would be best to focus on in the interim. I may bring that up at some point and see what advice they have. Thank you Bruce for the thought.

Just with common woodworking activities, creating jigs and such -- there's a ton I have planned to do which I know will pay off in the long run. I think my biggest obstacle is perfectionism. It's definitely going to be rough at first, so I just have to allow myself to mess up and learn as much as I can as I go. It's incredibly exciting nonetheless.

- Colby
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  #23  
Old 04-25-2022, 12:06 AM
BEJ BEJ is offline
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Colby, sounds like you are getting it worked out.

You mentioned you want to be perfect in your results. While this is desirable might be hard to build a perfect guitar. I'll bet of you asked any of the master builders on this site "Have you build the "perfect" guitar yet, most would say close but not there yet."

I too wanted to be perfect in my builds but soon found out I wasn't up to it, just didn't have skills and knowledge need. Was a little discouraging but after a while I had to accept my results and try not to make the same mistakes over and over. Some mistakes are too baked in and you just have to do what you can with that guitar and move on to the next one.

I think starting out one doesn't know what to do and possibly how to do it. So you read books, watch vids, look for any source of info. And thus jump in for your first build or two. Build some need tools and jigs with info from others cause you don't know jack. Use their work methods for the how, which for the most part worked but for somethings I found different ways to get where I need to be that worked better for me. I think I've rebuilt/moded every guitar specific tool I've made at least 2-3 times each time getting much better.

One of the great builders on this site, suggested one starting out should build 11-12 examples of a model, by the time you get to #12 your skills will improve and you will know if you want to keep doing given the stress(good stress) that comes with guitar building. There are somethings I really hate doing but you got to do them to have a guitar. I've built 11, maybe 10 because one(#3) went into the fireplace, it was a glorious fire!

It's good you can talk to Steve and Ryan for some heads up and guidance, I would think the better preped a student is (hopefully without some bad habits/work methods) would make their teachings much more effective.

Bruce,
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  #24  
Old 05-01-2022, 01:33 AM
CMStewart CMStewart is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BEJ View Post
Colby, sounds like you are getting it worked out.

You mentioned you want to be perfect in your results. While this is desirable might be hard to build a perfect guitar. I'll bet of you asked any of the master builders on this site "Have you build the "perfect" guitar yet, most would say close but not there yet."

I too wanted to be perfect in my builds but soon found out I wasn't up to it, just didn't have skills and knowledge need. Was a little discouraging but after a while I had to accept my results and try not to make the same mistakes over and over. Some mistakes are too baked in and you just have to do what you can with that guitar and move on to the next one.

I think starting out one doesn't know what to do and possibly how to do it. So you read books, watch vids, look for any source of info. And thus jump in for your first build or two. Build some need tools and jigs with info from others cause you don't know jack. Use their work methods for the how, which for the most part worked but for somethings I found different ways to get where I need to be that worked better for me. I think I've rebuilt/moded every guitar specific tool I've made at least 2-3 times each time getting much better.

One of the great builders on this site, suggested one starting out should build 11-12 examples of a model, by the time you get to #12 your skills will improve and you will know if you want to keep doing given the stress(good stress) that comes with guitar building. There are somethings I really hate doing but you got to do them to have a guitar. I've built 11, maybe 10 because one(#3) went into the fireplace, it was a glorious fire!

It's good you can talk to Steve and Ryan for some heads up and guidance, I would think the better preped a student is (hopefully without some bad habits/work methods) would make their teachings much more effective.

Bruce,
Hey Bruce,

Thank you for your advice. I like your advice about having around 10-11 builds of a model and then beginning to assess where you're at. I bought a good amount of Padauk for pretty cheap, and it's about enough for me to get in approx. 12 guitars. I would like to use the same woods for my first half-dozen or so guitars, so I can tweak each one with as much constants as possible, and see what works and what doesn't.

For right now, I'm really pumped, but also feeling really patient about things. It all takes time, and I have plenty of other things on my plate. But I'm eager to learn and figure things out, and experience what it's like to actually complete a guitar from the bottom up.

Perfectionism has always been a part of me, but I know it's never attainable. I just want to feel satisfied with the guitars I build, that they will do exactly what they're meant to -- make great music, and look beautiful doing it. I hope with a lot of help I can get there. Thank you so much for your thoughts.

- Colby
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