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  #16  
Old 06-11-2018, 12:14 PM
Ned Milburn Ned Milburn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arie View Post
i'm told it makes a very fine neck wood
That's a very nice idea!!
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  #17  
Old 06-11-2018, 12:45 PM
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I used it on a neck once and it was fine, but quite soft compared to a regular neck wood. But I would use it again if asked to.
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Old 06-11-2018, 02:11 PM
arie arie is offline
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I used it on a neck once and it was fine, but quite soft compared to a regular neck wood. But I would use it again if asked to.
softness in between Cedro and Mahogany? or softer then Cedro?


p.s, i went to the wood database and looked up the janka hardness of all three:

Yellow Cedar -580
Cedro -600
Honduran Mahogany -900

Last edited by arie; 06-11-2018 at 02:18 PM.
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  #19  
Old 06-11-2018, 02:28 PM
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Janka 600 for cedro, 580 for yellow cedar, so a bit softer but pretty close.

But it behaves much differently. It's structure is more like a top wood in the sense of long stringy grain rather than however one would describe mahogany.
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  #20  
Old 06-12-2018, 02:12 PM
arie arie is offline
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Originally Posted by Halcyon/Tinker View Post
Janka 600 for cedro, 580 for yellow cedar, so a bit softer but pretty close.

But it behaves much differently. It's structure is more like a top wood in the sense of long stringy grain rather than however one would describe mahogany.

ok, thx for that. i've been tempted to buy some for an upcoming 000-12 and let it season for a while.
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  #21  
Old 06-12-2018, 05:33 PM
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No reason not to, just don't expect it to work like mahogany...
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  #22  
Old 06-12-2018, 11:13 PM
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Bruce Sexauer Bruce Sexauer is offline
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I have worked quite a bit of Yellow cedar, though I have made no guitars from it. It carves like butter, and require less attention to grain direction than most woods. Also, it is close to pore-less, and finishes very easily. The smell is strong, and while at first it is seductive, after a while it starts to seem like it has a edge to it. IMO, of course. I do have quite a few guitar sets I milled from billets that came off the beach in BC about 40 years ago, and I may build with it yet. It is one of those woods that could be used for every part of a guitar save the bridge and fingerboard. The big danger with salvaged logs is that they can have defects that don’t come to light until advanced stages of the work.
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  #23  
Old 06-13-2018, 06:42 AM
printer2 printer2 is offline
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Originally Posted by Bruce Sexauer View Post
I have worked quite a bit of Yellow cedar, though I have made no guitars from it. It carves like butter, and require less attention to grain direction than most woods. Also, it is close to pore-less, and finishes very easily. The smell is strong, and while at first it is seductive, after a while it starts to seem like it has a edge to it. IMO, of course. I do have quite a few guitar sets I milled from billets that came off the beach in BC about 40 years ago, and I may build with it yet. It is one of those woods that could be used for every part of a guitar save the bridge and fingerboard. The big danger with salvaged logs is that they can have defects that donít come to light until advanced stages of the work.
That would be a fun build. I have built a few small nylon string guitars out of spruce and pine, come to think about it, also two steel strings with fir necks and red cedar tops. A little softer than the previous mentioned woods, harness of around 420 for the spruce. The difference in hardness of the early and late wood is a little difficult for carving the heel, the yellow cedar sounds much better. With lightweight tuners the total guitar weight is, well, light. It could make a perfect couch guitar.
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