The Acoustic Guitar Forum

Go Back   The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > Custom Shop

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #16  
Old 01-26-2021, 02:03 PM
GeoffStGermaine GeoffStGermaine is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Halifax, NS
Posts: 231
Default

Mark,
Very interested to see how this build progresses and to see your extensive use of hand tools.

I'm also here for the bloodwood. It is my favourite wood, though not my favourite one to work with.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 01-26-2021, 04:32 PM
Mark Hatcher's Avatar
Mark Hatcher Mark Hatcher is offline
AGF Sponsor
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Peterborough, New Hampshire
Posts: 3,814
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffStGermaine View Post
Mark,
Very interested to see how this build progresses and to see your extensive use of hand tools.

I'm also here for the bloodwood. It is my favourite wood, though not my favourite one to work with.
Thanks for following along!
__________________
Mark Hatcher
www.hatcherguitars.com

“We learn who we are in practice, not theory”
David Epstein
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 01-26-2021, 05:06 PM
Mark Hatcher's Avatar
Mark Hatcher Mark Hatcher is offline
AGF Sponsor
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Peterborough, New Hampshire
Posts: 3,814
Default How do you Replace a Band Saw?

It's likely you have a coping saw kicking around somewhere but, you're not sure where because you hate using that crappy tool you or your dad got from Sears a long time ago. The level of disdain only gets so high before the tool is banished to rust on a nail in the basement. Coping saws sell a lot of band saws!
Well this ain't your daddy's coping saw!



It has an adjustable tension cam for easy blade changes and tightening up the blade. You can also throw the cam and rotate the blade in place so you can cut much deeper like when your cutting the waist of a guitar top.
With the lightweight rigid frame you can get those blades really tight so the blades don't wonder, chatter, and break when cutting.
I put a custom mesquite handle on it that puts weight where you want it and I now have a coping saw that I think of using first before the band saw.

Once I got hooked on this I went with their fret saw that does cuts you can't do with band saws like these sound ports:





This fret saw has a titanium birdcage frame and weighs nothing except for the big heavier Mesquite handle I got for it. I'm willing to take on much more complicated sound ports because of these.

There will be more coming up on this one further into the build.
__________________
Mark Hatcher
www.hatcherguitars.com

“We learn who we are in practice, not theory”
David Epstein
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 01-27-2021, 11:13 AM
Archaic Guitars's Avatar
Archaic Guitars Archaic Guitars is offline
AGF Sponsor
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Indianapolis
Posts: 48
Default

Thanks for a glimpse into your process. I’m very impressed with the coping saw methods of cutting sound ports as opposed to using a router or dremel. I may borrow this idea... power tools make me nervous that far into the build.
Very impressive detail! That saw to cut out the soundboard is a monster!
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 01-27-2021, 12:46 PM
srick's Avatar
srick srick is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 5,039
Default

Mark - what does the fretsaw blade look like? Is it a spiral blade or a flat blade?
__________________
”Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.”
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 01-28-2021, 05:02 AM
Mark Hatcher's Avatar
Mark Hatcher Mark Hatcher is offline
AGF Sponsor
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Peterborough, New Hampshire
Posts: 3,814
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Archaic Guitars View Post
Thanks for a glimpse into your process. I’m very impressed with the coping saw methods of cutting sound ports as opposed to using a router or dremel. I may borrow this idea... power tools make me nervous that far into the build.
Very impressive detail! That saw to cut out the soundboard is a monster!
Great! Glad you found that helpful!

Quote:
Originally Posted by srick View Post
Mark - what does the fretsaw blade look like? Is it a spiral blade or a flat blade?
stick, I use flat blades. Pegas blades have been working very well for me.
__________________
Mark Hatcher
www.hatcherguitars.com

“We learn who we are in practice, not theory”
David Epstein
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 01-28-2021, 08:07 AM
JMURRAY16 JMURRAY16 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: NJ
Posts: 29
Default

Love this thread and will follow along to see the use of hand tools.
Would love to hear the “most valuable” hand tools list for an acoustic build in your opinion as well.

Thanks for doing this - really excited to follow along.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 01-28-2021, 10:29 AM
jaymarsch jaymarsch is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: North of the Golden Gate, South of the Redwoods, East of the Pacific and West of the Sierras
Posts: 7,789
Default

I'll enjoy following this thread, Mark. Beautiful wood choices and I am partial for things handmade - so this project is fun to follow for the guitar, the tools and the process. Thanks for sharing it with us.

Best,
Jayne
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 01-28-2021, 12:54 PM
Mark Hatcher's Avatar
Mark Hatcher Mark Hatcher is offline
AGF Sponsor
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Peterborough, New Hampshire
Posts: 3,814
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jaymarsch View Post
I'll enjoy following this thread, Mark. Beautiful wood choices and I am partial for things handmade - so this project is fun to follow for the guitar, the tools and the process. Thanks for sharing it with us.

Best,
Jayne
Great to have have you along Jayne!
__________________
Mark Hatcher
www.hatcherguitars.com

“We learn who we are in practice, not theory”
David Epstein
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 01-28-2021, 01:42 PM
jpd jpd is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Sacramento Valley Border
Posts: 10,551
Thumbs up Hmmmmmm.....

"Bloodwood is harder, stiffer, and heavier that Black Ebony and unlike Black Ebony it rings like glass. It is a very resonate wood with eternal sustain."

Now I'm GASSING for Bloodwood
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 01-28-2021, 02:07 PM
Mark Hatcher's Avatar
Mark Hatcher Mark Hatcher is offline
AGF Sponsor
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Peterborough, New Hampshire
Posts: 3,814
Default Plane Talk

Quote:
Originally Posted by JMURRAY16 View Post
.
Would love to hear the “most valuable” hand tools list for an acoustic build in your opinion as well.
This is well timed! There are many valuable hand tools many of which are hand planes. Planes come in four basic families that I use building guitars; Bench plane, Block planes, Finger planes and Specialty planes.

At this time there is one super star I'd like to talk about from the bench plane family, the smoothing plane. This tool does things that no power tool can do.
It is a finishing tool which when properly set up and used truly optimizes the look and functionality of a wood surface:



Here is a close picture of the Swiss alpine Spruce soundboard I am using on this guitar. The surface has been sanded as it normally would be for gluing or finishing:



Here is the same top ready for finish using the smoothing plane:



The planed surface is much shinier and the grain shows much better with more depth and chatoyance. That's because the surface has not been shredded by the abrasive action of sandpaper and the porous surface has not become all jammed up with sawdust.

You get better glue and finish adhesion to a planed surface. Important things like the braces, sides and bridge are going to stick better and hold longer. The wood will even look better while doing it!

Now lets talk about accuracy. One thing I needed to upgrade was my micrometer. With a high resolution micrometer I can gauge the depth of the plane's cut by measuring the thickness of the fine ribbons of wood being shaved:



I'm pulling just under .001" in this photo. You can almost see through that. The mouth of the plane is adjustable in front of the cutting edge to control the consistency of the cut.

To insure the plane's blade is not leaving edge grooves when doing a large surface I use this plane hammer:



The way it works is I take a a shaving on a piece of test wood and the use the micrometer to measure the two edges of the ribbon. I use the hammer to just tap the back sides of the plane blade until the ribbon edges exactly match. The hammer head is brass so it doesn't mar the sides of the blade. The right hammer makes this set up easy.



No sawdust, no dust mask, no dust collector, no ear protection, no noise just the sound of the wood doing my bidding!
__________________
Mark Hatcher
www.hatcherguitars.com

“We learn who we are in practice, not theory”
David Epstein

Last edited by Mark Hatcher; 01-28-2021 at 02:45 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 01-28-2021, 02:31 PM
Lonzo Lonzo is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Bavaria
Posts: 281
Default

Amazing to see the difference in that top surface, quite convincing, besides the other benefits you list... and a clue for the hammer... since I stop by your flickr page at times I saw that and couldn’t figure out why that was there...
fascinating.
It is quite obvious you do something you love and live. Congrats !
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 01-28-2021, 02:38 PM
magirus magirus is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: The County Palatinate, UK
Posts: 200
Default

It's marvellous to see you working this way with these tools, bravo!
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 01-28-2021, 05:48 PM
Mark Hatcher's Avatar
Mark Hatcher Mark Hatcher is offline
AGF Sponsor
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Peterborough, New Hampshire
Posts: 3,814
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jpd View Post
"Bloodwood is harder, stiffer, and heavier that Black Ebony and unlike Black Ebony it rings like glass. It is a very resonate wood with eternal sustain."

Now I'm GASSING for Bloodwood
I’ve been gassing to make a guitar with this Bloodwood for a long time now. I bought a nice sized board of it and re-sawed a number of back and sides sets. The big advantage of doing it this way is if a side breaks while bending I have a number of sisters to try again.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonzo View Post
Amazing to see the difference in that top surface, quite convincing, besides the other benefits you list... and a clue for the hammer... since I stop by your flickr page at times I saw that and couldn’t figure out why that was there...
fascinating.
It is quite obvious you do something you love and live. Congrats !
Thanks Lonzo, I do love what I get to do. I love working with these tools but,
in this thread I’m trying to separate out the actual advantages hand tools bring to the quality of my work.

Quote:
Originally Posted by magirus View Post
It's marvellous to see you working this way with these tools, bravo!
Thanks magirus!
__________________
Mark Hatcher
www.hatcherguitars.com

“We learn who we are in practice, not theory”
David Epstein
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 01-28-2021, 08:28 PM
Guitars44me's Avatar
Guitars44me Guitars44me is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Mountains east of San Diego
Posts: 4,656
Smile NICE!!!

This thread is too cool for school. Thank you for sharing all this. Really interesting!!!

Go hand crafting, Go

Paul
__________________
3 beloved John Kinnaird Customs. (I owned 6)
R.T 2c 12 fret Custom
2016 552ce 12X12
R.Wilson Weissy
A few choice 90s Taylors
budget electrics, and reso
Still Too many, but
"OLD ENOUGH TO KNOW BETTER, TOO YOUNG TO CARE!"
Reply With Quote
Reply

  The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > Custom Shop

Thread Tools





All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:31 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, The Acoustic Guitar Forum
vB Ad Management by =RedTyger=