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  #76  
Old 03-02-2021, 01:09 PM
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Mark Hatcher Mark Hatcher is offline
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Originally Posted by SJ VanSandt View Post
This is currently my favorite thread in Custom Shop! My hope is that you will update it occasionally even after you finish this gorgeous bloodwood guitar, as you acquire new hand tools and techniques.

I'm curious: how many of these techniques were used on my Woodsman? Did its old-time aesthetic inspire the use of more hand tools, or was it the other way around? My Hatcher guitar, by the way, seems to be going through a quite remarkable transfiguration. When I finally got the saddle replaced I had it set up with some extra light strings, thinking I needed that for bending the strings while playing blues, but after those changes the tone because far too beautiful to waste on the blues! I'm going to cultivate the classical end of my technique to play on the Woodsman - which is a good thing. I like John Hurt fine, but in the end I'd rather listen to Segovia.

Cheers,

Stan
Thanks Stan,

I'm glad you are enjoying this thread! I am truly enjoying my adventures in hand tools and sussing out the advantages of using them. I would say the Woodsman and the thinking behind it has helped me in my commitment to go further along this path.

I was asked to write an article for the Guild of New Hampshire's annual Journal magazine. The article goes into some depth about the Woodsman and my trying to find some authenticity in making a vintage influenced model. I don't think they do an electronic version but I'll likely scan it and post it up when the publication comes out.

I am also very happy to find you are finding some inspiration with the Woodsman you commissioned with me!

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Originally Posted by ruby50 View Post
Here is a tool you need- I found one in a barn and could not get it working, so I passed it on to a very eager group of restorers

https://www.museumsmanitoba.com/150/...oid=1997105-01

Ed M
That's quite a tool there! I'm already afraid of table saws and can't imagine trying to peddle power and work a table saw like that. I'll happily keep my Jointmaker Pro!

Thanks for commenting!
Mark
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  #77  
Old 03-02-2021, 07:58 PM
Naboz Naboz is offline
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Mark,
Once again I visit one of your posts, and have to say; you are a sculptor who makes guitars!
And your aesthetic for design is very refined, from the build particulars to the organic details of your inlays.
Maybe one day I will get to play one of your lovelies (we don't make it out to that Eastern edge much).
I also applaud you for your informative, instructional build posts--being an Art Instructor for 30+ years.
I'm watching this one through!
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  #78  
Old 03-05-2021, 05:10 AM
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Mark,
Once again I visit one of your posts, and have to say; you are a sculptor who makes guitars!
And your aesthetic for design is very refined, from the build particulars to the organic details of your inlays.
Maybe one day I will get to play one of your lovelies (we don't make it out to that Eastern edge much).
I also applaud you for your informative, instructional build posts--being an Art Instructor for 30+ years.
I'm watching this one through!
Thank you Naboz, I am very passionate about guitar building on many levels.
I take a very qualitative approach to lutherie which requires a lot of human involvement. My relationships and interactions with my customers, the guitar community, my fellow builders, my students and suppliers are all crucial elements for me to do what I do.
Thanks you for your kind words!
Mark
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  #79  
Old 03-08-2021, 11:03 AM
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Default Onto the Neck

I have the Mahogany neck black cut out. Cleaning up the blank starts with being sure the top where the fretboard lays is perfectly flat. Here I am checking flatness with a straight edge against the sun:



I've been upgrading layout tools and I thought this is a good time to review one. The straight edge is a SERX-24 from the Woodpecker tools:



This is a very accurate straight edge. You'll notice it has a wide bottom so it easily stands on edge on its own. The center of the edge is cut away so light won't be blocked by the thickness.
Unlike most other straight edges one side is indexed for measuring.

More to come!
Mark
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Last edited by Mark Hatcher; 03-08-2021 at 04:22 PM.
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  #80  
Old 03-08-2021, 02:55 PM
Bone0305 Bone0305 is offline
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Loving everything about this thread! Very inspiring!
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  #81  
Old 03-09-2021, 02:37 PM
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Default More Layout tools

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bone0305 View Post
Loving everything about this thread! Very inspiring!
Thanks Bone0305. I'm glad you find it inspiring!

One issue I have with the Woodpecker straight edge is that because it is made of aluminum it won't work as a guide to drag a razor down when slicing veneer for purfling etc. The straightedge's metal is too soft and will be damaged. I still have my steel one but it is also only two feet long and top purfling is usually cut in 32" lengths. Also dragging a razor on a straightedge doesn't always work as well as planned.

So I just ordered this Gramercy veneer saw:



If you look closely at the saw teeth you see they are angled in two different directions from one side to the other. The idea is if you are cutting thin veneer you can slice it off with the less aggressive side. If you are cutting thick veneer you can go to the more aggressive side.

Ideally I'll be able to cut thick veneers that I wouldn't even attempt with a razor and straightedge. I'll need to assign a straight board as a guide but this opens some new opportunities I can use with purfling lines.

I should have it on Friday and I'll have the weekend to play with it!
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  #82  
Old 03-11-2021, 06:53 AM
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Default So What does a Twenty Dollar Pair of Tweezers Get You?

As woodworkers we all have lots of crappy tweezers somewhere around in the shop. Splinters are inevitable especially with some woods like Wenge and this Bloodwood (aptly named) I am currently working with. A splinter starts the search for those crappy tweezers and a pin. The tweezers usually come from some pharmacy and cost a couple bucks. The jaws don't really line up and the tweezers roll around in your hand (especially your left hand) while you're trying to use them. The pin is typically caked up with old cured CA glue that you have to scrape off to get back down to the point.
Then the excavation begins to get the stupid splinter out and after too much time you are finally back to work. Within a couple minutes you see a wet streak of blood soaking into the spruce top that used to be ready for finish. Seems the hole you dug to get that splinter out did more damage than the splinter did. Now you have to put a piece of tape or a spot of CA on it so you can get back to work.

I have a new eye in my studio for identifying old crappy tools so I can replace them with better more useful tools. I'll make better guitars that way. So what does a better pair of tweezers look like?:



For twenty bucks you can get tweezers like these, except they are now called splinter forceps. The handle is wide and flat so they don't roll in your hand and the jaws don't wonder side to side. They come with a probe that stays protected inside its steel handle.



The teeth line up perfectly and there is a guide pin which makes sure the jaws stay perfectly aligned.



The three sided sharp pointed probe is very rigid and easy to control holding the textured handle.

Get the right tool for the job!
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Last edited by Mark Hatcher; 03-11-2021 at 07:04 AM.
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  #83  
Old 03-11-2021, 10:26 AM
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Smile Splinter forceps!

Mark, you are the tool Guru. Mr. Natural must be SO HAPPY, that you have taken up the gospel:

Always use the right tool for the job.

Thanks for the inspiration!

Paul
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  #84  
Old 03-14-2021, 07:39 AM
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I inherited a bunch of great German hand tools from my dad, who is a retired oral surgeon and has been woodworking for 60 years or so. Good tweezers, as you said, are hard to find!
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  #85  
Old 03-14-2021, 10:18 AM
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Uncle Bill’s Sliver Grippers - keep one in every first aid kit -
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  #86  
Old 03-14-2021, 01:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Guitars44me View Post
Mark, you are the tool Guru. Mr. Natural must be SO HAPPY, that you have taken up the gospel:

Always use the right tool for the job.

Thanks for the inspiration!

Paul
Thanks Paul,

Quote:
Originally Posted by tadol View Post
Uncle Bill’s Sliver Grippers - keep one in every first aid kit -
Those look pretty handy, Thanks!
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  #87  
Old 03-22-2021, 09:06 AM
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Default Rules

In reassessing my hand tools I am trying not to miss any categories. Layout tools are a big one. Since I do so much one off work I don't use many jigs and templates. I am often laying out my designs right on the piece of wood or shell that I am going to cut. Layout tools specifically for wood are most often the best. I bought a number of these newer woodworking rules which are working out well. Here is why:



First off they are red so they are easy to find, easy to read. The scale runs to twelve inches on one side and is a center scale on the other side.



The indexed edge has a 30% bevel which reduces parallax and overhead light reflections making it easier to read



The bottom has a slight recess so the rule grips flat surfaces better



There are finger indents on top so it's easier to push it around



There are accessory items available like this attachable end hook and adjustable measure stop. These accessories work with the 24" rule and the T-square as well

A good cut starts with an accurate layout. These make life a little easier!
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  #88  
Old 04-05-2021, 04:51 AM
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Default Hand Re-saw kit hardware

I just got this hardware kit for making a Roubo frame saw. It is for doing my re-saw work by hand. I'm looking forward to making the saw frame from a nice hardwood of my own selection.

The blade is four inches wide and four feet long:



I expect that by the time I get good at hand re-sawing my tonewoods I'll pick-up a couple knots in my kayak!
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Last edited by Mark Hatcher; 04-05-2021 at 05:14 AM.
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  #89  
Old 04-05-2021, 06:12 AM
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Now you need to dig a resaw pit and get a friend who also kayaks
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  #90  
Old 04-05-2021, 07:44 AM
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Originally Posted by j. Kinnaird View Post
Now you need to dig a resaw pit and get a friend who also kayaks
That’s a good idea

I was also thinking I could make a box with holes on the ends and take the box, the saw, and my wife and drive around to different towns and do magic shows!
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