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  #16  
Old 10-16-2021, 04:00 PM
Pdubs76 Pdubs76 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheGITM View Post
In 1987 I was in the US Army stationed in Germany and playing in a touring rock band on the weekends. We landed a local gig at a large beer festival in the local town where we were stationed, so we got to play for a large group of fellow GIs that we knew.

It was just after dark and we were cranking out the metal tunes. Everyone was drinking and having a good time. I hear our lead singers voice cracking badly and he was suddenly struggling... visibly. He left the stage in the middle of the song so we wrapped that song up as best we could.

Since 'my other music life' was acoustics and folk songs, the lead guitarist suggested a play an impromptu set with my acoustic. There were a few hundred beer-guzzling metal heads in the crowd and a rock band that clearly had a problem.


I strapped on the acoustic, did a quick sound check, then started playing 'Margaritaville'. The crowd seemed to get into it. When I finished the lead guitarist let me know that John (the singer) had been throwing up and had lost his voice entirely (turned out he had strep). So, I played a bunch more songs. When I felt things were winding down and maybe we'd put in enough time to get paid, I told the crowd I was going to finish with a classic, and that I'd really like for them to sing along...

"A long, long time ago... I can still remember... how that music... used to make me smile..."

When I got to the chorus, the entire beer tent, Germans and Americans, were wailing... "Bye bye, miss American Pie..." - I was nailing everything - every chord and vocal nuance... just spot on and I knew it.

I got to the end (which I would slow down, dramatically), and after the final chorus I got a huge ovation... but that's not the coolest part!

There was an E8 Master Sgt that never much cared for me. He came up to me when I left the stage, put his hand on my shoulder and with teary eyes said, "Manning, I thought you were just a burnt out space case dud, but after hearing you play that song I know I was wrong."

He went on to describe how much that song meant to him, and a lot of other soldiers that were caught up in the final years in Viet Nam. He and I were friends for the rest of my tour...
That’s a great story!
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  #17  
Old 10-16-2021, 04:16 PM
FingahPickah FingahPickah is offline
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About 30 years ago, I had just finished a solo acoustic set in a swanky, upscale restaurant lounge.
…A quite dignified senior couple turned to me and the lady said.. "Young man, I have to say we don't care much for the songs you've chosen but you do play them very well". I just said "Thank you" .. but I remember thinking "if the people in the cheaper seats could clap your hands... and the rest of you just rattle your jewelry" (- John Lennon)

I still think it was the funniest, most sincere compliment I ever received...
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  #18  
Old 10-16-2021, 04:25 PM
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srick srick is offline
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“Breathe.”

I had scheduled to attend a weekend workshop with Martin Grosswendt in the Berkshires. The workshop came at the end of a busy week and I blew in to the room about a half hour late, despite having left the house at 6:00 am.

I got my guitar out and Martin wanted to hear me play. God knows what I sounded like, but it must have been rushed and chaotic.

He stopped me right away and said, “Hold your guitar, don’t play. Just breathe.” After several minutes he had me close my eyes and slowly play the sixth string in unison with him for a couple of minutes. Then he added the fifth and fourth string at a slow tempo.

It’s so tempting to try to play fast, but it’s not necessary. Feeling the beat and playing with intent is the foundation of practice.

Rick
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  #19  
Old 10-16-2021, 05:20 PM
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Bob Womack Bob Womack is offline
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A little over ten years ago I was called to engineer, co-produce, and play guitar for an album. As their first-call guitarist I was turned loose on several songs and fell in love with one in particular. I decided it needed lap steel leads played in the style of David Gilmour. I brought out my rig and spent a day composing and playing leads for three places in the song, including the intro. The next day I spent a while doing a little mixing magic on the leads and then called in a guitar friend for an opinion. He wasn't quite impressed: "I think maybe you've over-playing here." I thought about it and decided that the figure I played was important to the development of the song and besides, it contained a tough-to-play little chordal bar slant that I liked. I left it in.

The next day the executive producer and label owner flew in to hear progress on the album. He asked to hear the songs in the order of his interest, which made the song I had concentrated on come last. When he finished with the playback of this song he broke into a huge grin and said, "You played all that stuff? I love it. This song just got promoted to the first song on the album and we are going to release it as the first single as well."

That has stayed with me to this day, both as a great compliment and as an encouragement to trust my instincts.

Bob
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  #20  
Old 10-16-2021, 05:30 PM
Jwills57 Jwills57 is offline
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At a guitar camp. A famous fingerstyle player was doing his workshop. The same question was asked him--"How about one tip to really take back with us." The player didn't hesitate. He said, "Forget fast, forget flashy, forget dazzling, not that there's anything wrong there. My one tip is just to ask yourself, 'Is what I'm playing musical?' Strive always to be musical, above everything else." That's always stuck with me all these years.
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  #21  
Old 10-16-2021, 06:59 PM
erhino41 erhino41 is offline
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I've had three instances that were huge in instilling the confidence that i needed to get where I am today.

First was in my Marine Corps days. Playing Dave Matthews song "Lie In Our Graves" on my godin a6 (closest to Dave's Chet Atkins that I could afford). My buddy comes in singing the song and is completely surprised that the lyrics didn't start. He swore it sounded exactly like the recording. I didn't think so but at that early stage in my playing it was the exact reinforcement I needed.

Second was playing "Virginia May" by Gregory Alan Isakov, when my wife yells from the other room that I should learn to play that song.

Third was playing one of my original pieces in a guitar store. A man listening exclaimed that he loves that song, like he's heard it before. I know it's original and it isn't lifted or derived from another song. Surprised, I asked him what song he thought it was. He thought for a second and realized he'd never actually heard it before. You know you got good when that happens.
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  #22  
Old 10-16-2021, 07:06 PM
Sugar Bear Sugar Bear is offline
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Sometimes my wife, and also my daughters when they visit, will open the case of whatever guitar I have out, take the guitar and bring it to me, and command me to, "Play!"

I've had nice complements when I've performed in public over the years, but the fact that my family wants me to play and sing for them means the most to me.
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  #23  
Old 10-16-2021, 07:53 PM
EZYPIKINS EZYPIKINS is offline
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Sound checking at a festival gig. Playing one of my G&L's.

Sound man came over the monitor and said. "That guitar sounds amazing".

Reaffirming what I already knew.

Leo era G&L's are amazing. Far more than what BBE makes today.
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  #24  
Old 10-17-2021, 12:35 AM
takamineGD93 takamineGD93 is offline
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The feedback I get from busking has meant more for me than anything a single persons says. Including a well known pro (complementing my songwriting).

Unknown people in the streets bosts my bad self-esteem in some way that don't happens in other invironments.
But I would need a degree in psychology to explaine why
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  #25  
Old 10-17-2021, 01:37 AM
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Peter Z Peter Z is offline
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I like when people start to dance.
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  #26  
Old 10-17-2021, 01:55 AM
Yamaha Man Yamaha Man is offline
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Brought my new Fender Newporter to a gig and one of the musicians said it looked like paneling...I sold it 2 weeks later.
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  #27  
Old 10-17-2021, 02:53 AM
NotveryGood NotveryGood is offline
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Told this before, but it fits the thread ,and I've never forgotten it. I was once practising what I thought was a clever piece of fingerpicking. An elderly Aunt who was visiting my wife poked her head around the door.... "That sounds quite nice, why not have lessons and learn to play properly?"
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  #28  
Old 10-17-2021, 03:53 AM
Garlic Breath Garlic Breath is offline
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I was playing a gig at the Rathskeller in Boston 40 years ago. I was using both my Les Paul and my Rick, the Rick being semi hollow with slightly cooler pickups. I remember during one song with thee rick, I turned and faced the amp during a solo, and due to the volume and semi hollow body, the feedback was incredible. After that I practiced often on playing while controlling the feedback.
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  #29  
Old 10-17-2021, 04:26 AM
SalFromChatham SalFromChatham is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dru Edwards View Post
What's some feedback you received that made a lasting impression on you during your guitar journey? Positive or negative. Sometimes the most simple words make the biggest impression.
I sold something on this forum about 8years ago and didnt pack it well. The buyer called me out. Now I pack well.

I also sold an 00-15 to a forum member about 2009 or 2010. I wanted to buy it back. I asked him. He said yes. I responded with “how about x for a price. Does that sound fair?” Instead of the the price that I sold it to him for a few months earlier. He correctly and politely told me to pound sand. I don’t know why I did that to this day, but made sure never to repeat it.
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  #30  
Old 10-17-2021, 06:06 AM
leew3 leew3 is offline
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At a bar gig in a time long ago a cowboy (nationally ranked rodeo rider-real cowboy) 'asked' me to play Lukenbach Texas. I allowed that I didn't think I could. He opened his coat to reveal a revolver and said "I think you can". Turns out he was right-and to this day I still can! That experience cured me of any stage fright since.
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