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  #46  
Old 11-23-2018, 08:50 PM
steelvibe steelvibe is online now
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Originally Posted by ac View Post
I've an OF660 also. Would you share the details how you did such a perfect matte finish on the gloss? I especially like the looks with the places you left the gloss intact.

Wondering about the materials and technique you used to make it satin.
Hi AC, thanks for the kind words. Not ignoring your request but enjoying a rare day off and spending time with the family. We just got back from Wreck it Ralph 2- cute flick if you have kids.

I will post the details tomorrow.
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Last edited by steelvibe; 11-23-2018 at 08:51 PM. Reason: mis- spelt a wurd
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  #47  
Old 11-24-2018, 12:26 AM
ac ac is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gerardo1000 View Post
"The Roadtrip has a larger body than the Overhead? This is new information for me. I had thought they were the same except for the neck.
How much larger is it?"

AZ Liberty, the Road Trip is similar to a mini-jumbo shape. Also, the back body is thinner on one side and deeper on the other side, which makes for a very comfortable guitar to play, still with beautiful basses. The OF660 ihas more like a 00 shape. Also, the scalel length of the Road Trip is 24.5 while the scale length of the OF660 is 24.00 if I remember well. In summary, the road trip looks and plays more like a regular sized guitar.
Both are 24.5 scale length.
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  #48  
Old 11-24-2018, 09:37 AM
Gitaman Gitaman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Jim View Post
Um... no. If you swap off an old guitar for a new one, the old one doesn't get half your stuff. And, I noticed that you said, "one(s)" - run that by your significant other to see how she feels about being "one of many." And, finally: you can lock a guitar in a case and come back to it months later and it won't be mad at you. Or try to remove any parts of your anatomy.


Capt,
I agree with all three. My wife is glad she is not a guitar that has to tolerate polygamy.
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  #49  
Old 11-24-2018, 04:35 PM
Res Ipsa Res Ipsa is offline
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Sean,

I’m with AC on this. How did you achieve the matte finish? And control the edges so nicely?

Hoping to follow your lead on this with my OF-660.

And it’s tomorrow now
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  #50  
Old 11-24-2018, 05:54 PM
EvanB EvanB is offline
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Res;

Does that mean that tomorrow will be tomorrow?
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  #51  
Old 11-24-2018, 06:27 PM
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Quote:
Does that mean that tomorrow will be tomorrow?
So if tomorrow never comes ..2 tomorrows might take even longer...oh the horror of it all...sigh ....
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  #52  
Old 11-24-2018, 07:58 PM
Res Ipsa Res Ipsa is offline
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Originally Posted by kramster View Post
So if tomorrow never comes ..2 tomorrows might take even longer...oh the horror of it all...sigh ....
Infinite tomorrows, and today never ends. It’s all happening now. Theorishly cool stuff.
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  #53  
Old 11-24-2018, 08:13 PM
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Yesterday is gone, tomorrow is still just a dream. Only NOW exists...... or so I've read in discussions of Zen philosophy. Must be time for dinner.
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  #54  
Old 11-24-2018, 08:46 PM
steelvibe steelvibe is online now
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I loved these guitars when I first discovered them in about 2015 but liked the matte version over the gloss even more. So, when I got a deal on a gloss I researched how I might refinish it and found a decent method.

Here are the tools used, and in order from left to right:



1.) 3M Scotch Brite (green) you can get pretty much anywhere. Super course and you use this to cut into the gloss- very effective

2.) Grey 3M pad bought at local hardware store (pks of 3 I think). This is the next step in smoothing out the scratching left from Step 1

3.) 0000 Steel Wool. This will give you a nice silky smooth finish before moving on to final finishing

4.) Automotive masking tape bought at an auto parts store to mask off area you don't want to get the paint from Step 5 on.

5.) Rustoleum 2X Matte Clear

This was a fun project and came out better than I anticipated and cost me less that $20. I must give credit for the initial idea to Brad Angove and his video on changing a gloss to matte video, but the idea of leaving the bevels gloss and creating a gloss pin stripe on the Journey top are mine. While I'm happy with the results I provide a little forewarning. You must be patient and watch Brad's video several times about his technique for spraying without professional grade sprayers. If you follow his technique you will not get orange peel or runs.

I started with the neck as this is how I reduce gloss necks anyway, but I don't spray them. If I purchase any guitar where the neck is gloss I just use the materials in the first 3 steps and let it be. 30 years of playing has taught me that I don't like gloss necks. Then I removed the hardware from the headstock, took electrical tape and placed it over the logo. I pressed down hard on the tape to reveal the impression of the logo and carefully cut out the extra tape around the perimeter of the logo with an X-acto. Now I moved through the steps for refinishing in order indicated above. This gave me a good practice run on spraying before moving onto the body (before spraying the headstock I also washed it with soap and water to have a baby-butt smooth and clean primed surface and made sure there was NO water left before spraying. I also washed the main guitar parts after working with the pads to prime the surface before painting).

Following the procedure used on the headstock I proceeded to scour the back and sides. I did not go in a criss-cross or circular pattern but kept the process unidirectional like when working with the grain on wood-- I didn't want any hashing or scratches to show up in the final product. Once the back and sides were completed and washed I masked the top off with the green tape taking care to especially cover the areas I wanted to keep gloss and painted according to Brad's technique in the video. I did get a couple runs but they are relatively easy to fix. (If this happens you simply wait for the run to fully cure and then use super fine wet sand paper, I forget what courseness but it's black in color, work out the run and re-spray when dry). I was careful though and only encountered a couple small runs in the entire project. The 2X Rustoleum can has a nice wide dispersion nozzle that works way better than the cans with narrower nozzles, especially when you hold back the can a good 12" or more. Nice even coating! Also shake that can for a good 2 minutes before spraying.

After the back and sides were dry, I applied a second coat. Then I reverse masked the back and and used the tape to mask out the pin stripping and bevels on the top. This tape is amazing and can even take the course green 3M crossing it's boarders as you work! I had no issue with pilling or tearing (although I was being careful to avoid this- nobody wants to have to mask off precise detail more than once ) Working around the bridge was a bit of a challenge but working around the neck joint was easy, because....it comes off . In the area of the neck joint I just filled it with newspaper held with masking tape to avoid overspray getting to the hardware. The top received about 4 coats since it is more visible and I needed it to be as close to perfect as possible, but that might have led to my one complaint which is......

there is a tiny hint of over-spray evident after taking the masking off of the pin stripping area. You have to really look but it is there and I'm still researching how I can blend it out. Still, if you do this just be aware- and definitely use the green tape and not blue painters or tan. The green stuff is so durable and even can stretch and conform to curves (makes sense since it is used for auto-body)

Anyway, here is Brad's video. I did not apply the polish he uses at the end though because I was very pleased with the satin look I achieved. I always will remember the wisdom of one of my art professors telling me that the secret to good work is "knowing when to stop".

If you do anything like this or come up with your own ideas I would love to see the results!

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  #55  
Old 11-24-2018, 09:13 PM
Res Ipsa Res Ipsa is offline
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Wow! Excellent description of the process. With caveats for the unwary. Really appreciate the time, thought (and patience) you put into this. Tomorrow does come after all. Gonna have to watch the video a bunch, read and re-read your post, before attempting.

You are an artist, sir.
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  #56  
Old 11-25-2018, 06:00 AM
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WOW! Incredibly detailed account with great insider tips on how to proceed step by step. Well worth waiting for.

Very much appreciated!! Thanks and thanks!

I will need to wait till I'm back in the States to attempt anything. Hard to find exactly the same materials to do it--and I don't want to take chances with substitutes with my lack of skills. But it's marked on my list to do items.

I will have some time to think how I want to implement the masking and what I want to leave gloss or not, as you did. Emerald once did a custom matte job just for the neck for a customer, and the artistic way they did it also really impressed me. Simple but elegant.

I hope to think a lot about what you've done and what they did and eventually come up with something similar before I begin the process.



Here's the thread:
https://www.acousticguitarforum.com/...d.php?t=450326
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  #57  
Old 11-25-2018, 08:05 AM
Earl49 Earl49 is offline
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From talking with Sean during the execution of my custom X20-12 last year, they shoot all the necks in glossy, then go back and sand the neck to satin/matte - if that is what the customer wants. FYI. I figured that if necessary I could "satin" the neck myself with Scotchbrite or 0000 steel wool, but I'm not having any trouble with the glossy neck. The concern is understandable, and I have roughened up some wood necks that have become hand polished in the past. It is possible that the automotive grade clear coat used on CF guitars doesn't have the same sticky feel as much as nitrocellulose necks that have become polished?
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  #58  
Old 12-09-2018, 01:21 AM
steelvibe steelvibe is online now
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But wait! There’s more!

Here is a very simple and entirely reversible mod...

Fret markers!!

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  #59  
Old 12-10-2018, 04:11 PM
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For those with interest, I had an email notice from Journey that they have a 10% discount until Dec 31 on all carbon models. If you go to Shop on their website, there is more info.

It seems they will offer a rebate or the "2018Holiday"coupon code will work directly with on some dealer's websites--possibly . . . or something like that. It's in connection with their Kickstarter campaign going on at present but appears it is not tied to it.


Price reduction makes all carbon models $1097.99, a bit less than the original price years ago.
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  #60  
Old 12-10-2018, 05:02 PM
steelvibe steelvibe is online now
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Very thoughtful AC. I got that email too but didn’t think to post it here. This is a great deal on a new Journey or a even just a great time to get introduced to CF in general.

I’m loving my OF660.
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