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  #31  
Old 04-04-2023, 08:29 AM
runamuck runamuck is offline
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If the joint wasn't perfect the glue was a gap filler. Epoxy is stronger than other adhesives in filling gaps.
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  #32  
Old 04-04-2023, 06:50 PM
Dothraki Dothraki is offline
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Originally Posted by runamuck View Post
If the joint wasn't perfect the glue was a gap filler. Epoxy is stronger than other adhesives in filling gaps.
Wouldnít it be better to have the seam fail rather than a new split in the wood if it dried out again? Hopefully that wonít happen but Iím actually glad it was the seam and not a split through the wood off center.
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  #33  
Old 04-04-2023, 08:03 PM
printer2 printer2 is offline
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Originally Posted by Dothraki View Post
Wouldnít it be better to have the seam fail rather than a new split in the wood if it dried out again? Hopefully that wonít happen but Iím actually glad it was the seam and not a split through the wood off center.
But the problem now is to get the two sides glued together without it splitting again given that the glue does not stick to itself as well as to wood.
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  #34  
Old 04-04-2023, 08:22 PM
Dothraki Dothraki is offline
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But the problem now is to get the two sides glued together without it splitting again given that the glue does not stick to itself as well as to wood.
Oh right. I need to check the crack with a macro lens. Iím curious thoughÖ how detrimental would rehumidifying and not gluing be? Assuming no loose braces (which they arenít). The reason why I ask is because I remember seeing an old Taylor that was split, good size gap too, from the bridge to the butt, but seemed to be only cosmetic and not affecting the structural integrity. Iíve also seen quite a few repaired seams with newer splits on either side of the repairÖso it had me wondering if rehumidifying and not gluing or cleating would be that much of an issue.
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  #35  
Old 04-04-2023, 09:14 PM
phavriluk phavriluk is offline
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Separation's still going to be there. It WILL show up again and collect debris all the while looking worse over time. No hiding behind the curtain to disappear. It needs humidification, regluing when it closes up and cleating. Especially cleating. Like driving on a flat tire. And this is a job for a professional experienced in such repairs.
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  #36  
Old 04-04-2023, 10:05 PM
Dothraki Dothraki is offline
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Separation's still going to be there. It WILL show up again and collect debris all the while looking worse over time. No hiding behind the curtain to disappear. It needs humidification, regluing when it closes up and cleating. Especially cleating. Like driving on a flat tire. And this is a job for a professional experienced in such repairs.
I appreciate the input but I am more than capable of this repair and honestly would not trust anyone in my area to do it. Iím a firm believer in if you want something done right, do it yourself and it has never steered me wrong. I even do all my dogís surgeries for him. One of his paws is from a kitten. Just kidding, but guitars are fairly simple constructions and I would consider this probably the easiest fix for an acoustic. The hardest part will be getting it re-humidified but itís spring now so hopefully thatíll be enough. This is exactly the reason I never wanted a solid wood guitarÖbut you just canít deny the tone and sustain. The problem is the drier they are the better they sound lol. Until they buzz or split open of course.
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  #37  
Old 04-05-2023, 06:21 AM
flatfinger flatfinger is offline
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Originally Posted by Dothraki View Post
how detrimental would rehumidifying and not gluing be?
Thereís quite a lot of vibration occurring where your crack is located. I wonder if the two vibrating surfaces would rub against each other at the edges and emit a wolf tone?

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Originally Posted by Dothraki View Post
the drier they are the better they sound
In my experience, only up to a point. I agree generally that overly humidified guitars sound muted. But Iíve also noticed that overly dry guitars donít sound as good to me. Of course, Iím located in the Denver area where my guitars almost always need hydration in our very dry environment.
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  #38  
Old 04-05-2023, 03:03 PM
Dothraki Dothraki is offline
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Originally Posted by flatfinger View Post
Thereís quite a lot of vibration occurring where your crack is located. I wonder if the two vibrating surfaces would rub against each other at the edges and emit a wolf tone?



In my experience, only up to a point. I agree generally that overly humidified guitars sound muted. But Iíve also noticed that overly dry guitars donít sound as good to me. Of course, Iím located in the Denver area where my guitars almost always need hydration in our very dry environment.
There was no wolf tone at the dryestÖbut I guess thatís a real good possibility especially rubbing together over time. Your average RH in Denver seems to be around where my winters areÖwhich is when it got too dryÖI canít imagine dealing with the dryness all year. Hard enough during the 4-5 months. As a side note, the separation is very very thin so itís going to be a pain getting glue in there which is one reason I thought about using hide glue. Iíve seen suction cups used too but feel like that would make a mess, plus once humidified that tiny visible line is going to be invisible. Maybe just a cleat will do the trick but Iíll attempt the glue line too.
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  #39  
Old 04-05-2023, 07:33 PM
redir redir is offline
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Someone mentioned epoxy before... It's rare I ever use epoxy on any guitar repairs but I would if it was truly seam separation. Believe it or not Titebond does pretty well at sticking to itself, not like HHG but still, it does work. But a good epoxy like West, as mentioned, will definitely glue Titebond to titebond seam separation.

As for cleats, what works better is to not use cleats at all but grafts just like the back graft that you see on the center seam of the back of your guitar. Cross grained spruce along the whole length of the crack. IT takes a special setup to clamp that up right though.
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  #40  
Old 04-07-2023, 05:47 PM
Dothraki Dothraki is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redir View Post
Someone mentioned epoxy before... It's rare I ever use epoxy on any guitar repairs but I would if it was truly seam separation. Believe it or not Titebond does pretty well at sticking to itself, not like HHG but still, it does work. But a good epoxy like West, as mentioned, will definitely glue Titebond to titebond seam separation.

As for cleats, what works better is to not use cleats at all but grafts just like the back graft that you see on the center seam of the back of your guitar. Cross grained spruce along the whole length of the crack. IT takes a special setup to clamp that up right though.
I have seen those before… there’s a tool you can cut to match the shape of the braces. I wonder if those are what cause the 2 parallel cracks I see a lot, or if those cracks are from a cleat holding on while the wood shrinks after it gets dry again after a repair.
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