The Acoustic Guitar Forum

Go Back   The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > PLAY and Write

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 09-15-2019, 11:35 AM
HAPPYDAN HAPPYDAN is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 196
Default Surprise!

I'm an at-home amateur, been playing for years. I always thought I was doing OK with a variety of folk and country songs, none of my own. I recently started working on Sir Paul's Blackbird, an easy piece or so I thought. I compared his recording to mine, and something was wrong. Then it hit me - my rhythm was off - way off. Very inconsistent. So I found an online metronome, set it for 90bpm, and after much practice and frustration, got better but not perfect. So, answer me this, you old (and young) Pros, how do you keep good consistent rhythm (without a percussionist) live on stage? Especially when your audience insists on "clapping time"?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09-15-2019, 02:57 PM
Mojo21 Mojo21 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 274
Default

Itís not something I think about to be honest. Iíve been told I keep good time but I reckon if you go on you tube and put a metronome on live acoustic performances not as many as you think will keep time.

I will have to try it ó could be wrong.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-15-2019, 08:40 PM
SprintBob's Avatar
SprintBob SprintBob is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Covington, LA
Posts: 3,216
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by HAPPYDAN View Post
I'm an at-home amateur, been playing for years. I always thought I was doing OK with a variety of folk and country songs, none of my own. I recently started working on Sir Paul's Blackbird, an easy piece or so I thought. I compared his recording to mine, and something was wrong. Then it hit me - my rhythm was off - way off. Very inconsistent. So I found an online metronome, set it for 90bpm, and after much practice and frustration, got better but not perfect. So, answer me this, you old (and young) Pros, how do you keep good consistent rhythm (without a percussionist) live on stage? Especially when your audience insists on "clapping time"?
With no rhythm or groove, itís hard to call it music right? If you watch a master like Tommy Emmanuel, watch his left foot. Itís always following or in his groove. The best way IME to develop that internal groove is to use the metronome all the time for everything. Itís the only way you will eventually internalize your sense of groove or rhythm. I guess I am stating the obvious, right?
__________________
Collings 0001A (Adi/Mahogany)
Froggy Bottom H-12 (Adi/EIR)
Rainsong CO-WS1005NST (all carbon fiber)
Robinson 12 Fret SS Dread (Spruce/Mahogany)
Santa Cruz Skye 00 (Adi/Coco)
Taylor K-22ce 12 fret (all Koa)
Eastman 810CE (Spruce/Maple archtop)
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-15-2019, 10:11 PM
nitram nitram is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 443
Default

If you can find a video of Paul recording the song (and listen to the White Album) you can see and hear him tapping his foot as he sings and plays.They obviously put a mic on the floor by his foot.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 09-16-2019, 05:40 AM
JonPR JonPR is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 4,844
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by HAPPYDAN View Post
I'm an at-home amateur, been playing for years. I always thought I was doing OK with a variety of folk and country songs, none of my own. I recently started working on Sir Paul's Blackbird, an easy piece or so I thought. I compared his recording to mine, and something was wrong. Then it hit me - my rhythm was off - way off. Very inconsistent. So I found an online metronome, set it for 90bpm, and after much practice and frustration, got better but not perfect. So, answer me this, you old (and young) Pros, how do you keep good consistent rhythm (without a percussionist) live on stage? Especially when your audience insists on "clapping time"?
Congratulations if you have an audience who are that into it! (I never do...) Just follow them!
The advantage is that an audience will all clap at the same rate, and tend to fall into following each other, which will keep them steady. The disadvantage is that (1) it may not be the tempo you want, and (2) audiences can tend to have a tendency to speed up - as they get into it. But generally - on the occasions when I've noticed it happening! - audience clapping is a steady enough tempo. Maybe not metronomic, but near enough. And hey, even if they do speed up, follow them: they're having a great time, so what more could you want?

Otherwise - yes the answer is metronome practice, because your inner sense of time is not clockwork. You can think you're keeping steady time when you're not. And on stage, even the slightest hint of nerves will make you play faster without realising it. You find yourself making mistakes, not because your technique has somehow fallen apart, but because you're playing too fast, or speeding up as you play, without noticing.
The metronome is how you train your inner clock to keep time better.
__________________
"There's only two kinds of music: good and bad. I like both kinds." - Duke Ellington.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-10-2019, 11:29 AM
HAPPYDAN HAPPYDAN is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 196
Default

Thanks for your responses, I like to say I need all the help I can get! I haven't been able to muster the courage to sing and play in public for years, although friends, who may be just patronizing, say I'm still pretty good (for 68 years old). I have checked out some local coffee shops and wine bars that offer an open mike, but still just to scared to step up.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-11-2019, 06:28 AM
BobbyMocha BobbyMocha is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Upper Midwest, USA (no accent tho)
Posts: 124
Default

Dan, Iím also a newbie student (at age 50) and that was the first song my instructor had me learn. I resisted the metronome at first but I found playing it over and over at 40 bpm for weeks and then 45, and then 50 and so on was extremely helpful. I found that the groove became so ingrained in my head that I eventually played it in time without effort.

I found doing it exaggeratedly slow for weeks made all the difference. It was actually harder to do it slower but it cemented the chords and changes in my head because I was paying more attention to the timing. Once that happened speed came naturally.

I donít play it perfectly but its in time
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-11-2019, 07:06 AM
SprintBob's Avatar
SprintBob SprintBob is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Covington, LA
Posts: 3,216
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BobbyMocha View Post
Dan, Iím also a newbie student (at age 50) and that was the first song my instructor had me learn. I resisted the metronome at first but I found playing it over and over at 40 bpm for weeks and then 45, and then 50 and so on was extremely helpful. I found that the groove became so ingrained in my head that I eventually played it in time without effort.

I found doing it exaggeratedly slow for weeks made all the difference. It was actually harder to do it slower but it cemented the chords and changes in my head because I was paying more attention to the timing. Once that happened speed came naturally.

I donít play it perfectly but its in time
This. It seems tedious at first but when you combine getting the song memorized and slowly ramping it up (you have to be able to comfortably play it 99% technically accurate at each tempo increase), you will then be able to focus on playing it musically and appealing to your audience.
__________________
Collings 0001A (Adi/Mahogany)
Froggy Bottom H-12 (Adi/EIR)
Rainsong CO-WS1005NST (all carbon fiber)
Robinson 12 Fret SS Dread (Spruce/Mahogany)
Santa Cruz Skye 00 (Adi/Coco)
Taylor K-22ce 12 fret (all Koa)
Eastman 810CE (Spruce/Maple archtop)
Reply With Quote
Reply

  The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > PLAY and Write

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:39 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, The Acoustic Guitar Forum
vB Ad Management by =RedTyger=