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  #16  
Old 12-06-2017, 01:19 PM
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If a student has reached about a level 2 in Royal Conservatory of Music graded repertoire with strong fundamentals too (no quick and easy task), I would then recommend Juan Martín's "Solos Flamencos" published by Mel Bay. This book has both a CD and DVD. With a good classical high beginner foundation, it saves a lot of time and effort and helps students progress as they then dive into Martín. With guidance, his book helps to develop the aire and compás. Similar to the goals of RCM, Martín helps the student to gradually develop fundamentals and repertoire that is not too easy nor too difficult. As a student begins making significant progress with Martín, they become equipped to begin exploring lots of other repertoire and even creating some of their own. No doubt, there are other books out there. However, any student of mine that has more than a passing interest in flamenco works through this book.
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Old 12-06-2017, 01:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BuleriaChk View Post
Flamenco is not a series of set "pieces", except at a very advanced solo level or for noodling classical guitarists.
First, you have to be able to keep chording compas like any Gypsy street kid in Jerez....
Exactly. ;-)
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Old 12-06-2017, 01:50 PM
BuleriaChk BuleriaChk is offline
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If you are at an advanced level, just scrape the material off of YouTube, CD, DVD, or LP (which was all we had in the 60's). You'll develop your ear much better than trying to read off of music, and develop a real understanding of Flamenco positions and (especially) right hand techniques as used in compas.

LOTS of material on YouTube once you know how to count compas....
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Old 02-19-2018, 01:21 PM
BuleriaChk BuleriaChk is offline
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Here are some links of Puro Flamenco (I've had DVD's of these, but just discovered them on YouTube:

Many friends on the first (including those in the background), recognizable from Bar Pepe. This was made a few years after we were there (the first two guitarists are Juan and Paco del Gastor), the first dancer is Andorrano (Joselero's son). The last dancer (with the cane) is Pepe Rios (Agustin's brother). The second dancer is Paco Valdepenas (I usually get confused between him and Ansonnini, but Ansoninni was probably in San Francisco when this was made) The older woman singing is the legendary Fernanda de Utrera:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R_Tn8YtYQ24 Flamenco en Moron 1984

(There is a complete list of performers at the end.)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UffkRPJEoL0&t=173s Triana Fiesta
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