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  #1  
Old 10-17-2017, 06:21 PM
EvanB EvanB is offline
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Default hybrid classical guitar strings

The traditional classical nylon string guitar now has a number of variations--hybrids that take from both steel and nylon string development. The new nylon hybrids have cut-a-ways, a bit narrower nut width, various scale length, and so forth. I am an advocate for what's called "cross-over" nylon strung guitars.

Until recently there were no hybrid strings to match hybrid nylon string guitars. Enter The John Pearse Folk Series featuring a Thomastic-Infeld string, at $18.17. Expensive yes, Great? Yes.

The T/I strings are a hellishly clever mix of steel and nylon. Three of the strings are bronze wound on a nylon core. Three of the strings are nylon wound around a steel cord. These are definitely hybrid strings.

I've been messing with them for a few years now. At first I loved them, and then I was not so sure. Now, I've come back to loving them.

You can play blues on these strings, and you can play classical. The bass is beautifully classical while the trebles let you accentuate the highs.

The only problem with these strings (other than their incredible cost) is that the high e tends to fall apart--either at the tuners or at the saddle. The reviews of the T/I strings commonly mention the high e problem.

I just bought a set of the Thomastic-Infeld Classic S strings and will see how the high e does. In any event, I recommend the John Pearse Folk Series if for no other reason than playing and hearing a genuine hybrid classical/contemporary guitar.
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  #2  
Old 10-18-2017, 11:00 AM
ceciltguitar ceciltguitar is offline
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Hi Evan. 1995 seems "recent to me". Sometime in the early to mid 1990s was the first time that I bought Thomastik Infield "Classic C", as well as "Classic S" strings. I liked them both, but only for experimental purposes as a diversion.

I hope that you enjoy them!
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Old 10-18-2017, 12:22 PM
EvanB EvanB is offline
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Cecil;

I should have said "new to me." I had no idea these strings had been around for so long. You hit the nail on the head with the term "experimental." I've learned that the most important part of my use is control--I've had to learn to temper and vary my picks and strums. I don't know if I'll continue using the strings, but I like the idea of hybrid strings for a hybrid instrument. Fun stuff.
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Old 11-13-2017, 06:07 PM
EvanB EvanB is offline
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I will no longer be using these strings. I've loved the blending of steel and nylon string. They have been an interesting challenge with steel-sounding highs and classical sounding lows. They match my expectation for strings that fit a truly hybrid guitar.

However, After several tries, I can't endorse this product. They are very expensive and the high E unravels. I've played my new strings twice, about an hour each time, and I can see that the high E is falling apart. This is after I used a 2000 grit sand paper to mellow out the edges of the saddle.

So, if you have a hybrid guitar, you might want to spend the money for an interesting sound challenge. I don't begrudge the money I've spent on giving these strings a run, but it's a short-lived expedition. At least, that's been my experience.
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Old 11-14-2017, 06:11 AM
Strumalot Strumalot is offline
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Evan, thanks for the info on that!

I would be very interested in hearing more about your nylon string and pick experiments. I've done a lot of testing with my CA GX, but not much with the X10N. Right now I have lazy strings on it ~ D'addario EJ34 Folk strings with the ball ends ~ but I would do some string tying for experiments.
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Old 11-14-2017, 09:01 AM
EvanB EvanB is offline
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Strumalot;


I just tried some of the ball end EJ34 folk strings. I like tying the strings and have rarely gone for the ball ends even though they are faster to change. I've tried most of the D'addario strings and find the folk strings to be the least appealing relative to projection--to my ears, the normal tension D'addarios sound better and are more lively.

I'm still messing with various high tension strings which I both like and dislike. I've found that the harder tension strings start approximating more the projection and tone of steel strings, which is OK, but they also tend to get a little plinky.

As you can tell, I have yet to find my best nylon strings. I think CF instruments are particularly sensitive to strings and it takes time (and many changes) to find the one that serves the best. The task is a bit easier for steel string players because there are more of them and there are a number of threads devoted to the best strings for particular instruments.

There are others on this forum who might have a better handle on the best nylon strings for a CF guitar, hopefully they'll chip in on the topic.
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Old 11-14-2017, 12:58 PM
Strumalot Strumalot is offline
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Thanks Evan!... (I was looking for the definitive Evan shortcut to ultimate nylon string perfection, but the search continues...)
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  #8  
Old 11-14-2017, 06:12 PM
EvanB EvanB is offline
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Strum;

My suspicion is that there are no short cuts and little in the way of perfection. In short, like you, and others on this forum, I am simply on the journey, looking for those short cuts and seeking perfection. It's a long and winding road, threaded with carbon fiber, and decorated with an incredible variety of accouterments.
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  #9  
Old 11-16-2017, 03:32 PM
Tom2 Tom2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Strumalot View Post
Right now I have lazy strings on it ~ D'addario EJ34 Folk strings with the ball ends ~ but I would do some string tying for experiments.
I'm not into string tying either, so on my last string change I tried these:

New! Diamond Secure String Ties / Tieblock System

from rosetteguitarproducts.com

I like them. They are easier than traditional tying, don't scratch the tieblock or change the string break angle like traditional tying does, work with any strings, and cost $16. Unless I come up with something better, this is what I'll be using from now on.

My only deviation from the instructions is that I leave some extra on the end of the pure nylon strings and melt them into a ball with a soldering iron after tying them into place.

As for string choice, I like pure nylon for it's softness of tone and feel. Composite strings with smaller diameter, higher tension, and brighter tone move me towards the sound and feel that I was moving away from in the first place.

With steel strings, callus management was a big deal, and I could never take a break of more than two days. Otherwise, I would risk a callus tear that typically took about two weeks to fully repair. Now, with large diameter nylon, I can easily go four or five days without playing, and have never torn a callus. Softer tone, gentler feel, less regimented lifestyle, what could be better?
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  #10  
Old 11-16-2017, 06:24 PM
EvanB EvanB is offline
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Tom2;

I sort of like string tying. But I am also into easy, so will be looking into Diamond Secure Strings--thanks for the information.

I am bowled over by your observation that the composite strings moved you toward the sound you were moving from. What are your favorite nylon strings?

You order any new guitars recently?
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  #11  
Old 11-16-2017, 10:37 PM
JimCA JimCA is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EvanB View Post
Tom2;

I sort of like string tying.
Yes, string tying is only a part of nylon string changing, worth the extra effort if the sound is better.

I have dueling X7s, one nylon one steel string. I play them both every day. I'm back and forth on which I prefer. The nylon is easier to play, the steel-string sounds like steel string, which some days I prefer, some days not.

Disclaimer -- what works for me and my short scale, small X7 may not apply to you and a larger nylon string guitar.

I've tried all the offerings from D'Addario and some from Oasis, Savarez and John Pearse. My current favorites are D'Addario EJ46FF carbon trebles (102.6 pounds tension) -- pretty high tension for nylon, but way less than my custom light Martin Retro MM11s on my steel string X7. I don't remember what Emerald installed on my nylon X7 -- it was either EJ44TT (93.2 pounds) or EJ44C (106.4 pounds). I've tried all three and the basses and trebles seem most balanced with the EJ46FFs.
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  #12  
Old 11-17-2017, 09:27 AM
EvanB EvanB is offline
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Jim;

What a cool pair of guitars. I relate to the notion of sometimes feeling like steel strings and sometimes feeling like nylon. Nylon is my preference, but most nylon strings seem weak on the trebles. I haven't tried the D'addario EJ46FF, but they are now on my list. Thanks for the suggestion.
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  #13  
Old 11-17-2017, 12:26 PM
EvanB EvanB is offline
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Tom2: Thank you for pointing to the Diamond Secure string ties--I've ordered.

Sean: If you're reading this--I'd like the Diamond Secures on the new nylon electric.

JimCA--I've ordered the EJ46FF strings, looking forward to the sound.


It's almost like Christmas.
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  #14  
Old 12-12-2017, 10:38 AM
JimCA JimCA is offline
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Buster Jones changes nylon strings much faster than I can change steel strings. However, I think carbon trebles need an extra twist over what he does.

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