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Old 12-20-2020, 08:32 PM
mc1 mc1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KevWind View Post
High diction hey ? That's a first .

Your reply that song lyrics fall short of ordinary language ,,, is a tough read . Honestly is a bit baffling and certainly went right over my head , considering prose is the use of ordinary language
Prose was the wrong choice of words. I thought it meant unrhyming poetry, but I see it really just means words without metrical structure. That's not what I( meant.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KevWind View Post
What I said (Or perhaps, what I was trying to say was)
Achieving "Prosody"........ not "Prose" (two very different things ) that evokes the intended emotion and actually works in context, involves twice the complexity in songwriting, as it does in poetry, simply because it involves twice the elements, language and music, as opposed to just language (note I said language not "prose" ) ...
Prosody (linguistics): In linguistics, prosody is concerned with those elements of speech that are not individual phonetic segments (vowels and consonants) but are properties of syllables and larger units of speech, including linguistic functions such as intonation, tone, stress, and rhythm.

Prosody (music): In music, prosody is the way the composer sets the text of a vocal composition in the assignment of syllables to notes in the melody to which the text is sung, or to set the music with regard to the ambiance of the lyrics.

But my reply still stands. It may be more complicated to write words to music, but if the words aren't nearly as good, I don't think the musical prosody make up for that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KevWind View Post
Simple math, 1 is 50% less than 2...
Really, that's where we are here? I feel insulted.
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