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-   -   Whats this file called? (https://www.acousticguitarforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=561149)

LemonCats 10-18-2019 06:28 PM

Whats this file called?
 
https://www.littlebrotherblues.com/G...p/P7034765.JPG

What would i search to find this type of file? Its a rasp file i guess but to get this specific shape is there a name for it? Like a flat rasp, square rasp, coarse file, etc?

I live in the US
I just need a cheap one to do this exact thing in the picture (Shave down the extra wood around the strings on a saddle) The saddle is resting on a very fragile cone so I would of used sand paper but id rather use a super coarse file like this and let the weight and coarseness of the file do the work

Brucebubs 10-18-2019 09:41 PM

Google '******* file' and no, I'm not swearing (cursing), that's what they're called.

The word has been automatically deleted but it refers to a fatherless child.

Frank Ford 10-19-2019 12:47 AM

It's a coarse "double cut" file and it has a safe edge.

BudHa 10-19-2019 06:40 AM

A little input from an amateur with some experience. I have studied Littlebrotherblues instructions on setting up a National guitar. His instructions are great. But when I fit a new National biscuit on my guitar, I use a smaller and finer file for removing excess saddle material. I have ruined several saddles by using a file with a coarse profile. I have cut the slots too deeply before by not recognizing how quickly a nut file will go through maple. Saddles and National biscuits are cheap. Have fun working on your guitar.

LemonCats 10-21-2019 12:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BudHa (Post 6190228)
I use a smaller and finer file for removing excess saddle material. I have ruined several saddles by using a file with a coarse profile. I have cut the slots too deeply before by not recognizing how quickly a nut file will go through maple. Saddles and National biscuits are cheap. Have fun working on your guitar.

Thanks! This might sound weird but i actually really did have alot of fun when I was doing it haha!

I actually waisted about 30 minutes on the first slot because I didn't realize the nut files only cut in one direction lol

But everything went smoothly first try

Now Im on my way to pickup a set of 10 different files to trim the excess from the top because from what I've heard its best to have about half the diameter of the wound strings sticking out. Perhaps for sustain? idk why exactly but I'm gunna do it.

And thanks everybody for answering! I really appreciate it!

ClaptonWannabe2 10-21-2019 07:14 PM

One place to look, old estate sales and or farm estate sales. I have about 3 or 4 of those. One is absurd and too large for anything but hooves and bark off a tree. "Farrier File/Rasp"

Fortunately both grandpas dealt with live stock and horses at times one was a farmer. Just old tools I could bring myself to throw away when found.

anchovy 11-07-2019 05:24 AM

I heard those refered to a 4 in 1 carpenters file

resorisen 11-20-2019 05:08 AM

I would cut the slots with nut files to the correct depth with strings on moving each individualy when cutting/ checking depth. Then removing the saddle from the cone and filing the excess. Then reinstalling. If the saddle is glued to the biscuit an not easily removed precaution to not crush it imbalance the cone may include using support of one hand to hold from underneath the cone and using a handheld detail sander.

Silly Moustache 11-20-2019 05:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LemonCats (Post 6190001)
https://www.littlebrotherblues.com/G...p/P7034765.JPG

What would i search to find this type of file? Its a rasp file i guess but to get this specific shape is there a name for it? Like a flat rasp, square rasp, coarse file, etc?

I live in the US
I just need a cheap one to do this exact thing in the picture (Shave down the extra wood around the strings on a saddle) The saddle is resting on a very fragile cone so I would of used sand paper but id rather use a super coarse file like this and let the weight and coarseness of the file do the work

Your question cannot be answered properly on this forum due to the common name for a coarse 12" file which I was taught in my metalwork lessons in school and seems to be conflated as a "rude" word - it isn't of course unless used as an insult.
It is a generally acceptable term for illegitimacy in the UK and Commonwealth countries, but in earlier times also simply meant coarse - and this is a coarse cut file.

Kerbie 11-20-2019 05:26 AM

The vBulletin software automatically deletes a number of words. It has nothing to do with something being conflated or misinterpreted as rude. It's an automatic delete. It is the software system we have and it isn't going anywhere. The OP has his answer. Leave this alone and move on.

charles Tauber 11-20-2019 09:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Silly Moustache (Post 6216159)
Your question cannot be answered properly on this forum...

Be creative: "ba$tard cut".

Or as Frank replied:

Quote:

Originally Posted by Frank Ford (Post 6190137)
It's a coarse "double cut" file and it has a safe edge.


Quote:

Files are graded according to the degree of fineness or coarseness and whether the teeth are single- or double-cut.

Single-cut files have rows of teeth cut parallel to each other at an angle of about 65 degrees from the centerline. Single-cut files are used for sharpening tools, finish filing and draw-filing. They are also the best tools for smoothing the edges of sheet metal.

Double-cut files have rows of teeth criss-crossed so teeth become diamond-shaped for fast cutting. Use double-cut files for quick removal of material and for rough work.

The fineness or coarseness of a file indicates tooth spacing and the number of teeth per inch. There are three basic dif- ferent grades: Ba$tard Cut, Second Cut and Smooth Cut. Ba$tard Cut has the fewest number of teeth per inch. Second Cut has more teeth per inch. Smooth Cut has the greatest number of teeth per inch. Varying degrees of coarseness or fineness are comparable only when files of the same length and shape are compared because coarseness of a file in- creases as the length from tip to heel increases. Which means a 6-inch file, either single or double-cut, has more teeth per inch than a 12-inch file.
From http://www.simondssaw.com/handfiles/...le%20Facts.pdf


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