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J-Doug 09-18-2022 11:00 AM

Jimi Hendrix and his posthumous legacy
 
Hi guys,

I'll preface this as coming from a place of true love and admiration for Jimi Hendrix and the original Experience. I came to "discover" Hendrix in my late teens, falling in love with the four albums released in his lifetime and early posthumous releases like Cry of Love. I read what I could (the McDermott book was a favorite) and bought up almost everything I could afford on a student's budget, though suffering through some egregious Alan Douglas releases. In the end I came away with a real appreciation for what Hendrix accomplished in such a short time. I honestly feel that, while some may have displayed more technical mastery, Jimi has never been truly equaled.

I will also say that I am happy that the Hendrix family gained control of his work. I feel that the right people are in control of Jimi's legacy, especially with the involvement of Eddie Kramer. I do understand that they are trying their best to preserve what they can and share the best of what they have access to with the public.

But while some releases are quite stunning (Miami Pop Festival, BBC, Monterey, a lot of Winterland) and some releases have strong moments (Berkeley, Atlanta, Maui), some of the material released since his death has been, quite frankly, so woefully underbaked that I feel slightly embarrassed listening to it. Isle of Wight is particularly bad and Both Sides of the Sky is completely awful (do we really need two Stephen Stills tunes on a Hendrix release?).

Which brings me to my point: What are some of the factors impacting the quality of these releases, especially his post-Ladyland work? I feel there are three major things:

1. Underdeveloped material: I do not feel that many of the post-Ladyland tunes were ever fully developed. Some are 100% there like Ezy Ryder, Drifting, Freedom. But often Hendrix was barely singing, borderline mumbling through these new tracks, such as Hey Baby in its multiple forms. The guitar work and most of the riffs are strong but a lot of the melodies are weak and the lyrics non-existent. Compared to the tunes on a release like Bold As Love, these tunes are simply not fleshed out nor ready for prime time.

2. Billy Cox was no Noel Redding: I get it, Noel Redding was very difficult according to some accounts. And yeah of course Jimi wanted to play with his old friend Billy. But Cox was just not of the same caliber as Redding. Cox was positively boring in comparison. It did work well on Band of Gypsys but comparing Noel’s driving bass lines and how they propelled the original Experience forward to Cox’s lines is particularly telling. I feel Cox dragged the trio down.

3. The Decline of Mitch Mitchell’s playing: After the release of Ladyland I feel that the quality of Mitchell’s drumming severely declined and is very evident in recordings of the time. Some have hinted at substance abuse but I think the blame falls mostly at Jimi’s feet. After playing with Buddy Miles, Hendrix was looking for a heavier drumming style in the group and this was the wrong thing to ask of Mitch. IMO Mitch’s swinging, beautifully busy, jazz influenced style was only secondary to Hendrix’s playing on those original sides. Mitchell is truly a genius on Bold and elsewhere. Asking him to abandon this for a plodding style influenced by pounders like Baker and Bonham was a critical error and the music suffered for it.

You’ve read my opinions (such as they are) so what are yours?

godfreydaniel 09-18-2022 11:35 AM

When they finally reissued Hendrix in the West, it was a shame that some tracks from the original album were replaced with other recordings due to rights issues with Royal Albert Hall, in particular “Little Wing.” I used to have an excellent Japanese-issued CD of it, which was lost long ago. My original vinyl is a bit battered. The version of “Red House” on the album is one of my all-time favorite Hendrix recordings.

J-Doug 09-18-2022 11:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by godfreydaniel (Post 7089021)
When they finally reissued Hendrix in the West, it was a shame that some tracks from the original album were replaced with other recordings due to rights issues with Royal Albert Hall, in particular “Little Wing.” I used to have an excellent Japanese-issued CD of it, which was lost long ago. My original vinyl is a bit battered. The version of “Red House” on the album is one of my all-time favorite Hendrix recordings.

Yes In The West is a favorite. I remember finding it on vinyl in Montreal. Not a flattering cover photo though, weird choice IMO.

Silly Moustache 09-18-2022 03:30 PM

I was a big admirer of Jimi,but sadly I never saw him live as every time Jimi, Noel and Mitch were playing in London, my band were playing somewhere else.

I once met Noel ... in a late night petrol station when we were both returning from gigs. He seemed uneasy and nervous.

I met Mitch some time before his association with Jimi, when he was a "Saturday boy" at Marshall's first shop in Ealing. Everybody else including the guys in my band were talking amps and electric guitars, Mitch and I talked drums and I invited him to come to some of our gigs and help me with my kit, as Charlie Watts had done with me.

It seems so sad that everyone in that great trio are no longer with us.

Brucebubs 09-18-2022 11:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Silly Moustache (Post 7089194)
I was a big admirer of Jimi,but sadly I never saw him live as every time Jimi, Noel and Mitch were playing in London, my band were playing somewhere else.

I once met Noel ... in a late night petrol station when we were both returning from gigs. He seemed uneasy and nervous.

I met Mitch some time before his association with Jimi, when he was a "Saturday boy" at Marshall's first shop in Ealing. Everybody else including the guys in my band were talking amps and electric guitars, Mitch and I talked drums and I invited him to come to some of our gigs and help me with my kit, as Charlie Watts had done with me.

It seems so sad that everyone in that great trio are no longer with us.

Andy - you should get this down somewhere - I love reading about your early, unique musical experiences - just wonderful stuff!

Dlew919 09-20-2022 06:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by J-Doug (Post 7089002)
Hi guys,

I'll preface this as coming from a place of true love and admiration for Jimi Hendrix and the original Experience. I came to "discover" Hendrix in my late teens, falling in love with the four albums released in his lifetime and early posthumous releases like Cry of Love. I read what I could (the McDermott book was a favorite) and bought up almost everything I could afford on a student's budget, though suffering through some egregious Alan Douglas releases. In the end I came away with a real appreciation for what Hendrix accomplished in such a short time. I honestly feel that, while some may have displayed more technical mastery, Jimi has never been truly equaled.

I will also say that I am happy that the Hendrix family gained control of his work. I feel that the right people are in control of Jimi's legacy, especially with the involvement of Eddie Kramer. I do understand that they are trying their best to preserve what they can and share the best of what they have access to with the public.

But while some releases are quite stunning (Miami Pop Festival, BBC, Monterey, a lot of Winterland) and some releases have strong moments (Berkeley, Atlanta, Maui), some of the material released since his death has been, quite frankly, so woefully underbaked that I feel slightly embarrassed listening to it. Isle of Wight is particularly bad and Both Sides of the Sky is completely awful (do we really need two Stephen Stills tunes on a Hendrix release?).

Which brings me to my point: What are some of the factors impacting the quality of these releases, especially his post-Ladyland work? I feel there are three major things:

1. Underdeveloped material: I do not feel that many of the post-Ladyland tunes were ever fully developed. Some are 100% there like Ezy Ryder, Drifting, Freedom. But often Hendrix was barely singing, borderline mumbling through these new tracks, such as Hey Baby in its multiple forms. The guitar work and most of the riffs are strong but a lot of the melodies are weak and the lyrics non-existent. Compared to the tunes on a release like Bold As Love, these tunes are simply not fleshed out nor ready for prime time.

2. Billy Cox was no Noel Redding: I get it, Noel Redding was very difficult according to some accounts. And yeah of course Jimi wanted to play with his old friend Billy. But Cox was just not of the same caliber as Redding. Cox was positively boring in comparison. It did work well on Band of Gypsys but comparing Noel’s driving bass lines and how they propelled the original Experience forward to Cox’s lines is particularly telling. I feel Cox dragged the trio down.

3. The Decline of Mitch Mitchell’s playing: After the release of Ladyland I feel that the quality of Mitchell’s drumming severely declined and is very evident in recordings of the time. Some have hinted at substance abuse but I think the blame falls mostly at Jimi’s feet. After playing with Buddy Miles, Hendrix was looking for a heavier drumming style in the group and this was the wrong thing to ask of Mitch. IMO Mitch’s swinging, beautifully busy, jazz influenced style was only secondary to Hendrix’s playing on those original sides. Mitchell is truly a genius on Bold and elsewhere. Asking him to abandon this for a plodding style influenced by pounders like Baker and Bonham was a critical error and the music suffered for it.

You’ve read my opinions (such as they are) so what are yours?

One of the issues Noel Redding had was the Hendrix would often record a bass line over noels. But you’re right in terms of the more dynamic and interesting bass lines of the experience.

davidbeinct 09-20-2022 07:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dlew919 (Post 7090290)
One of the issues Noel Redding had was the Hendrix would often record a bass line over noels. But you’re right in terms of the more dynamic and interesting bass lines of the experience.

Of course that leaves us with the question whose were they? I think Billy’s bass fit where Jimi was trying to go but of course he never got there.

mr. beaumont 09-20-2022 07:20 AM

Honestly, I hardly ever listen to the studio stuff anymore.

For me, Band of Gypsies was the pinnacle. How something can simultaneously sound SOOOO 1970 and like it's from the future blows me away.

FrankHudson 09-20-2022 11:00 AM

I could write volumes, let me try to be brief.

Obviously some of the posthumous stuff was unfinished. I don't mind that. I even enjoy warts and all recordings. They all potentially can tell us something about the art and the artist. Let those that never clammed, cast the first clam!

I'm ambivalent about what Alan Douglas did. He did want the unfinished stuff to sound as finished as possible, thinking (an arguable point) that it's better to get new listeners than deep fans who want to hear every outtake. Likely too easy to think of Douglas as a cheap exploiter. His resume with other musicians before the Hendrix recordings is considerable.

Redding as bassist. I thought he was underrated back in the day, but later I've read that it's sometimes Hendrix playing bass on studio tracks. I don't mind Billy Cox at all. Buddy Miles can grate at times (sorry, ghost of Buddy, it might be just me!) but Cox doesn't.

Mitchell. I haven't noticed the drop off, but it may be because I so admire some of his stuff (may be earlier?). JDoug has pointed out something from their listening that I may want to listen for too.

As to Hendrix not being the still unconquerable shred master or a titan of all musical forms and theory. As JDoug notes, it's beside the point. He completely redefined the electric guitar, and so changes those who don't even particularly like him.

FrankHudson 09-20-2022 11:12 AM

Anyone want a Jimi Hendrix while alive and complicated story? Here's my Jimi Hendrix 2022 observation piece:

Jimi Hendrix's Tears (a 7 minute story)

J-Doug 09-20-2022 01:20 PM

Thanks for the thoughtful responses, guys!

Re underbaked tunes: I love the tunes I feel Hendrix fully completed post-Ladyland. Some of it is his best work but various sources have released some uncompleted material that I think damages Hendrix's legacy. I really don't think Hendrix would have released it if he lived. What if someone interested in hearing Hendrix for the first time started with Both Sides of the Sky? I'd totally be turned off.

Re epic Redding vs. Cox bass battle: I'm mostly referencing Redding vs. Cox live, since yeah who knows who was actually on tape in the studio. I recommend comparing Miami (Redding) to Maui (Cox) to get a flavor of what I'm getting at. Redding is really driving the tunes forward.

Re Mitchell: definitely listen to Maui to also hear where Mitchell was at later with Hendrix. It's hard to believe it is the same drummer as Bold. And Mitchell was going for a lot of double bass ala Baker and it just wasn't gelling IMO.

FrankHudson 09-20-2022 08:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by J-Doug (Post 7090571)
Thanks for the thoughtful responses, guys!



Re Mitchell: definitely listen to Maui to also hear where Mitchell was at later with Hendrix. It's hard to believe it is the same drummer as Bold. And Mitchell was going for a lot of double bass ala Baker and it just wasn't gelling IMO.

I wonder if stage volumes were making it harder for a drummer to use more subtle techniques.

davidbeinct 09-21-2022 05:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FrankHudson (Post 7090864)
I wonder if stage volumes were making it harder for a drummer to use more subtle techniques.

Was Jimi known for playing especially loud?

Dlew919 09-21-2022 07:14 AM

Not as loud as the who, but everything was turned up to 10. The feedback was only possible at high volume.

Joe Beamish 09-21-2022 07:34 AM

Jimi was a beautiful painter in the studio, especially on Electric Ladyland. For me, the more psychedelic he was, the better.

His fatback funk era was noteworthy, but the long solos are tiresome.

FrankHudson 09-21-2022 09:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by davidbeinct (Post 7091029)
Was Jimi known for playing especially loud?

Not necessarily in the studio, but live in those days it quickly became cranked Marshalls.

J-Doug 09-21-2022 12:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FrankHudson (Post 7091196)
Not necessarily in the studio, but live in those days it quickly became cranked Marshalls.

The Experience started out with some small combos that Chas Chandler bought for them, which they "accidentally" dropped down the stairs in order to get some Marshalls!

davidbeinct 09-22-2022 06:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FrankHudson (Post 7091196)
Not necessarily in the studio, but live in those days it quickly became cranked Marshalls.

Sorry irony doesn’t come across well online. I guess I should have winked. Zappa once said that being near Jimi’s Marshall’s when he was playing felt like being physically attacked.

FrankHudson 09-22-2022 10:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by davidbeinct (Post 7091768)
Sorry irony doesn’t come across well online. I guess I should have winked. Zappa once said that being near Jimi’s Marshall’s when he was playing felt like being physically attacked.

Sorry, I couldn't hear you. :)

If the flares of your bell-bottoms weren't flapping in the speaker breeze, you weren't loud enough.

Ryan Alexander 09-23-2022 07:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by davidbeinct (Post 7091768)
Zappa once said that being near Jimi’s Marshall’s when he was playing felt like being physically attacked.

Never read that one before, great quote!! :lol:

My hair still stands up every time I listen to Power to Love on BOG at 0:18 when he comes in right after Buddy's "AH!". So freakin' good.

One criticism I've read a lot over the years was that the family (in particular his sister Janie) went overboard releasing every single thing they could dig up. On one hand I think Jimi would not have wanted some of the current releases to be shared. As a fan, I've enjoyed listening to everything although it's a bit weird for his legacy to have a bunch of what many consider "subpar" recordings mixed in with such timeless works.

I am a big fan of his early work, however my favorite era has always been Woodstock -> BOG. There was just so much raw intensity in his playing during that time.

Great thread, J-Doug! I think you've made some very interesting points (especially #3), although to be honest I haven't spent much time thinking critically about things like Billy vs. Noel or Mitch's decline.

J-Doug 09-23-2022 08:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ryan Alexander (Post 7092529)
Never read that one before, great quote!! :lol:

My hair still stands up every time I listen to Power to Love on BOG at 0:18 when he comes in right after Buddy's "AH!". So freakin' good.

One criticism I've read a lot over the years was that the family (in particular his sister Janie) went overboard releasing every single thing they could dig up. On one hand I think Jimi would not have wanted some of the current releases to be shared. As a fan, I've enjoyed listening to everything although it's a bit weird for his legacy to have a bunch of what many consider "subpar" recordings mixed in with such timeless works.

I am a big fan of his early work, however my favorite era has always been Woodstock -> BOG. There was just so much raw intensity in his playing during that time.

Great thread, J-Doug! I think you've made some very interesting points (especially #3), although to be honest I haven't spent much time thinking critically about things like Billy vs. Noel or Mitch's decline.

Thanks Ryan! :) I've listening a lot lately and maybe thinking a bit much. ;)

tippy5 09-24-2022 08:36 PM

I was 12 in 67' when Are You Experienced came out. That is such a great record! The drumming is absolutely astonishing.

I missed seeing him, too. As my first concert was Hollywood Bowl James Taylor 1972.

I love playing Foxxy Lady it's got such a wild, rhythmic lick. It sounds simple but for me it was hard to ape. Jimi's right hand is so incredible.

He was part of that decade of music 65 thru 75 where everybody was young, open and creative.

Joe Beamish 09-25-2022 07:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tippy5 (Post 7093718)
I was 12 in 67' when Are You Experienced came out. That is such a great record! The drumming is absolutely astonishing.

I missed seeing him, too. As my first concert was Hollywood Bowl James Taylor 1972.

I love playing Foxxy Lady it's got such a wild, rhythmic lick. It sounds simple but for me it was hard to ape. Jimi's right hand is so incredible.

He was part of that decade of music 65 thru 75 where everybody was young, open and creative.


That’s exactly the most magic decade: 1965 to 1975. Just before my time, but it didn’t make me long to figure out it was the sweet spot. To this day I’m still discovering great music from that period.

Ryan Alexander 09-27-2022 09:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by J-Doug (Post 7092553)
Thanks Ryan! :) I've listening a lot lately and maybe thinking a bit much. ;)

Nah, it's fun to consider these types of things! I didn't mean to downplay your curiosity as I'm a big fan and it's genuinely interesting. If I remember correctly, Jimi and Billy were war buddies, correct? Although I love the BOG era for lots of reasons, I do agree that Noel was the better player.

Joe Beamish 09-27-2022 11:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ryan Alexander (Post 7095202)
Nah, it's fun to consider these types of things! I didn't mean to downplay your curiosity as I'm a big fan and it's genuinely interesting. If I remember correctly, Jimi and Billy were war buddies, correct? Although I love the BOG era for lots of reasons, I do agree that Noel was the better player.


You could be right, but I don’t recall ever hearing that Noel was a very good player at all. Can you point out some songs that show off what he was good at?

I know he started as a guitarist. Which is probably neither here nor there. So did Paul McCartney.

jseth 09-27-2022 02:03 PM

Fun thread, to remember all that Jimi Hendrix brought to my life and those around me, back in the 60's... it's difficult for many younger people to believe, but Jimi was NOT all that popular, way back when... he wasn't selling out venues or playing stadiums on his own. Maybe at the very end of his life, but nothing like you've seen since then.

I bought and liked every studio album he made... there's great stuff on every record, but my favorite is still the first one... "Are You Experienced was SUCH a groundbreaking record! It still breathes fire, even after nearly 60 years...

I've listened to most of the posthumous releases, and there have been moments on all of them that are worthy...

One recording that I will gladly pay to have and hear (if it's ever released!) is the tape that exists of Jimi and Stephen Stills, jamming together, back when Stills was recording his first solo lp, and Jimi plays on "Old Times, Good Times". Even though I'm pretty sure there is not a lot of substance in that recording, both players were very much at "the top of their game" at the time, and it will be worth hearing, no matter what they play!

It's really difficult to convey what seeing Jimi play live was like... he had SO MUCH FUN playing and singing! Absolutely a Master of his instrument in an incredibly effortless way... he really never appeared to be "trying to do something difficult"... he just kept playing and doing just that, on each and every song he sang!

Funny; even though I loved that first record, it didn't take me long to wonder what Jimi Hendrix would sound like with a STELLAR backing band! With Steve Winwood and Jack Casady on "Electric Ladyland", we got a bit of a glimpse of what was possible. With Noel and Mitch, the music was very good, but... I actually liked Fat Mattress with Noel better than his playing w/ Hendrix... go figure!

Anyway, great thread! I feel that it is such an honor to have been present and paying attention when so many of these great players were out there, doing their thing so brilliantly!

FrankHudson 09-28-2022 11:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jseth (Post 7095341)
Fun thread, to remember all that Jimi Hendrix brought to my life and those around me, back in the 60's... it's difficult for many younger people to believe, but Jimi was NOT all that popular, way back when... he wasn't selling out venues or playing stadiums on his own. Maybe at the very end of his life, but nothing like you've seen since then.

I bought and liked every studio album he made... there's great stuff on every record, but my favorite is still the first one... "Are You Experienced was SUCH a groundbreaking record! It still breathes fire, even after nearly 60 years...

I've listened to most of the posthumous releases, and there have been moments on all of them that are worthy...

One recording that I will gladly pay to have and hear (if it's ever released!) is the tape that exists of Jimi and Stephen Stills, jamming together, back when Stills was recording his first solo lp, and Jimi plays on "Old Times, Good Times". Even though I'm pretty sure there is not a lot of substance in that recording, both players were very much at "the top of their game" at the time, and it will be worth hearing, no matter what they play!

It's really difficult to convey what seeing Jimi play live was like... he had SO MUCH FUN playing and singing! Absolutely a Master of his instrument in an incredibly effortless way... he really never appeared to be "trying to do something difficult"... he just kept playing and doing just that, on each and every song he sang!

Funny; even though I loved that first record, it didn't take me long to wonder what Jimi Hendrix would sound like with a STELLAR backing band! With Steve Winwood and Jack Casady on "Electric Ladyland", we got a bit of a glimpse of what was possible. With Noel and Mitch, the music was very good, but... I actually liked Fat Mattress with Noel better than his playing w/ Hendrix... go figure!

Anyway, great thread! I feel that it is such an honor to have been present and paying attention when so many of these great players were out there, doing their thing so brilliantly!

You make an often-overlooked point to start with. Hendrix was a star in a much smaller world of ballrooms and "underground rock" and the next step world of Seventies until the age of streaming was only emerging at the end of his life. His record sales were not spectacular in the US, and his fandom among a generalized contemporary audience was not remarkable. I'm not talking about his rep and influence among guitarists of his time here, just music audiences. There are complex and significant reasons for this, which I'll defer going into here.

I never saw Hendrix live, but another point you make was something that the "un-experienced" often noted when first seeing him: his stage presence and relationship to his guitar and its playing overwhelmed them in small clubs. Of course Hendrix was doing stage things that other Afro-American guitarists had done, but they were largely unknown beyond Chuck Berry's stuff to the young white rock audience.* And from what film evidence we have, he did that guitar stage business very well. Even beyond the "circus tricks" stuff like playing behind his back, over the shoulder, with his teeth, or with guitar held in unorthodox positions, he just seemed one with the instrument, fully in control of its possibilities. In my short time playing with a restrung left-hand Strat I was shocked at how awkward a Strat was is played as Hendrix did. Little things, like the cord jack bumping into my right arm all the time never seemed to bother Jimi.

None of these performer's tricks should reduce our debt to Hendirx as a player, as a pure musician. Even Hendrix worried about the latter being missed subsequently in his career, but it was part of what he manifested.

To tie together your two, often under-considered points that I reinforce, there's this long pull quote from Robert Christgau's review of Hendrix's American debut at Monterey Pop that I featured a few years back on my Project's blog:

Christgau on Hendrix at Monterey, and it's not a positive review in the least



*You know what strikes me as weird making that statement. Wild stage acts in mass audience Rock'n'Roll were not generally unknown when Hendrix broke in. Little Richard and Jerry Lee Lewis on piano. James Brown as a front man. Sax players walking the bar and rolling on the floor. Even upright bass players riding the bass like a horse! But Chuck Berry (as important and as good as he was) was about the limits of what a generalized white teenager would know in 1966-67 for guitar tricks on stage. I know this is AGF, but a lot of us play or played electric too. Odd to think that we were generally the staid, just here on business playing our guitar licks performers in the before Hendrix era.

davidbeinct 09-28-2022 12:17 PM

Christgau, like many rock critics, focuses far more on image than music. I don’t think it takes the benefit of hindsight to realize that a white rock critic calling a black performer an Uncle Tom is not a good place to be.

FrankHudson 09-28-2022 06:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by davidbeinct (Post 7095928)
Christgau, like many rock critics, focuses far more on image than music. I don’t think it takes the benefit of hindsight to realize that a white rock critic calling a black performer an Uncle Tom is not a good place to be.

Yup.

I wrote a variation on an old musician joke, you know the one: "How do you get a guitarist to turn down..."

How do you get a rock critic to shut up?

Give him an all-instrumental album.

turtlejimmy 10-16-2022 06:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by davidbeinct (Post 7095928)
Christgau, like many rock critics, focuses far more on image than music. I don’t think it takes the benefit of hindsight to realize that a white rock critic calling a black performer an Uncle Tom is not a good place to be.


Yeah, it's hard to read that review. The man is an idiot, obviously, but what a bunch of ugly crap to write. I'm glad I missed all that.

I may have seen Jimi Hendrix in concert, at the Monterey Pop Festival, but I was 11 and don't really remember any of the performances. An older kid down the street had asked my parents if they would take him to this upcoming concert that he heard about, his parents wouldn't. Mine were up for anything, often dragging me off to stuff like this, and pulled camping gear together and, with the kid in the station wagon with us, off we went.

It wasn't until a few years later that I bought a little transistor FM radio with the first money I made on a paper route, and really tuned into all the music going on at that time. I do remember my family walking through the grounds during the day at the Monterey Pop and coming across a building with a very large room that was filled with people who were not saying anything. They were all just in there hanging out in a huge group, absolutely silent. It was so weird I had to ask my Mom what was going on in there. She told me to ask her again about it in five years. :D

I loved Jimi's last album and some years after getting that LP, got a CD that contained a bunch of unfinished stuff to go with it, just mixed in. It was a little odd but it made me realize what a perfectionist he was, in the studio, and how long he took to fully develop songs. He was a unique cat.




Turtle


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