The Acoustic Guitar Forum

The Acoustic Guitar Forum (https://www.acousticguitarforum.com/forums/index.php)
-   RECORD (https://www.acousticguitarforum.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=43)
-   -   Home Studio talk (https://www.acousticguitarforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=340529)

Luke_ 05-06-2014 02:43 PM

Home Studio talk
 
I thought we could continue the discussion of home studio here, where I can continue to suck up s'more input. Maybe we can reply here as long as y'all are still willing. I've got some general recording technique questions as you've prolly read.

MikeBmusic 05-06-2014 02:55 PM

Ask away. I'd also suggest you look though all the info at homerecording.com. The forums there are filled with good advice (mostly) and knowledgable people.

BoneDigger 05-06-2014 03:11 PM

This is indeed the place to ask such questions. I am new to all of this and have learned a lot from the folks on this forum.

Todd

Luke_ 05-06-2014 04:09 PM

Right now I'm leaning towards the UR 44 and a pair of E70's... I seem to be fond of the idea of 2 mics. I'm using a purchased version of mixcraft 6 I'm very familiars with it. I'm sure there is better DAW out there but I should be able to get my feet wet with the suggested above.
Is it common to pan each mic when mixing? I understand that phasing issues my occur the farther you separate the two mics.
The 3-1, is that an "at least rule" the further away they get can you dial the gain in to bring line input more consistent prior to mix. Or is compression/other effects used to normalize the mix? Maybe I can start my own thread so we don't get this one to fouled up.

Transferred this over... Looking to gets some mics and an interface. Discussing DAW software and mics/setup

ChuckS 05-06-2014 04:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Luke_ (Post 3943760)
.....The 3-1, is that an "at least rule" ......

I consider the 3:1 rule (spaced pair micing) as a guideline. As the distance between the mics is increased, relative to the distance from the guitar to the mics, the phasing issues can be reduced.

However, it's a bunch of tradeoffs. For example, if you decide the best mic locations for the tone you want breaks the rule, then what do you do? If you move the mics closer to the guitar while keeping the distance between them you might have issues with proximity effect. If you increase the distance between the mics while keeping the distance to the guitar the same you might not pick up the tonal sweet spot you want.

For me, I usually use spaced pair stereo micing and relax/ignore the 3:1 rule. I usually have my mics in the range of 16-22" from the guitar and the distance between them is usually 30", sometimes less. I don't playback in mono, so that's a non-issue. I usually put one mic panned pretty much hard left and the other pretty much hard right, so that helps. Micing in X-Y could be used, but I've never liked the sound I get as well as a spaced pair.

Luke_ 05-06-2014 05:46 PM

Looking forward or the day I get try out these techniques. Any insight on raising the gain to compensate for a mic that is moved further away?

Legolas1971 05-06-2014 06:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Luke_ (Post 3944012)
Looking forward or the day I get try out these techniques. Any insight on raising the gain to compensate for a mic that is moved further away?

You can try that and it depends what kind of room your recording in. Just keep in mind that when you increase the gain sometimes noise is also increased. Try a bunch of different set ups and see which you like better. I always mic in stereo using the XY config and then pan hard left and right. Sometimes I'll stack another take for a bigger and richer sound.

ChuckS 05-06-2014 08:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Luke_ (Post 3944012)
Looking forward or the day I get try out these techniques. Any insight on raising the gain to compensate for a mic that is moved further away?

When moving the mic further away it's advantageous to have a mic with high sensitivity and low self noise, and a preamp with low noise at high gain. Also, as was already stated, the effects from the room will increase and may be good or bad.

Luke_ 05-06-2014 09:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ChuckS (Post 3944245)
When moving the mic further away it's advantageous to have a mic with high sensitivity and low self noise, and a preamp with low noise at high gain. Also, as was already stated, the effects from the room will increase and may be good or bad.

Makes sense

Quote:

Originally Posted by Legolas1971 (Post 3944085)
You can try that and it depends what kind of room your recording in. Just keep in mind that when you increase the gain sometimes noise is also increased. Try a bunch of different set ups and see which you like better. I always mic in stereo using the XY config and then pan hard left and right. Sometimes I'll stack another take for a bigger and richer sound.

You double the existing track or a second track maybe played a little different? Doubling the track with a copy wouldn't do anything for the sound in theory right? Wouldn't time need to be shifted or adjusted with fx in order to change anything.

Been watching videos about cubasis, looks very well built. Learned a lot from the lessons. Anyone have a preference to studio monitors?

ChuckS 05-06-2014 09:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Luke_ (Post 3944285)
....... Anyone have a preference to studio monitors?

Equator D5's

Legolas1971 05-07-2014 07:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Luke_ (Post 3944285)
Makes sense



You double the existing track or a second track maybe played a little different? Doubling the track with a copy wouldn't do anything for the sound in theory right? Wouldn't time need to be shifted or adjusted with fx in order to change anything.

I when I stack them I usually play exactly the same way. Stacking guitars makes them sound bigger and richer. That's the sound I'm usually looking for in my songs. I like the acoustic guitar to drive the song so stacking helps me accomplish that. After I record both takes (in stereo of course) then I use Elastic audio (in Pro Tools) to snap them to the grid and/or lay them back. Sometimes individual waves forms need adjustment so I'll go in and move those as well. Then I Eq and compress....

bagpipe 05-07-2014 08:26 AM

If you're just getting started in recording (not sure if that is true in your case ?) I would concentrate on using one mic for now. Most of my better efforts at getting a nice recorded tone have come from using one condenser mic, and pointing it at a spot between the 12 and 14th frets. I find there are so many other variables which affect that tone, before considering bring a second mic into the equation.

My biggest limiting factor is the crappy space I record in. For that reason I tend to have the mic fairly close to my guitar (no more than 6 or 7 inches away) and add some subtle reverb and compression to fill out the tone a little.

rick-slo 05-07-2014 08:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ChuckS (Post 3943900)
I consider the 3:1 rule (spaced pair micing) as a guideline. As the distance between the mics is increased, relative to the distance from the guitar to the mics, the phasing issues can be reduced.

However, it's a bunch of tradeoffs. For example, if you decide the best mic locations for the tone you want breaks the rule, then what do you do? If you move the mics closer to the guitar while keeping the distance between them you might have issues with proximity effect. If you increase the distance between the mics while keeping the distance to the guitar the same you might not pick up the tonal sweet spot you want.

For me, I usually use spaced pair stereo micing and relax/ignore the 3:1 rule. I usually have my mics in the range of 16-22" from the guitar and the distance between them is usually 30", sometimes less. I don't playback in mono, so that's a non-issue. I usually put one mic panned pretty much hard left and the other pretty much hard right, so that helps. Micing in X-Y could be used, but I've never liked the sound I get as well as a spaced pair.

3:1 rule does not apply to recording solo guitar. One earlier thread http://www.acousticguitarforum.com/f...d.php?t=282231

MikeBmusic 05-07-2014 09:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rick-slo (Post 3944724)
3:1 rule does not apply to recording solo guitar. One earlier thread http://www.acousticguitarforum.com/f...d.php?t=282231

It does if you have one mic near the guitar and one out in the room. :)

ChuckS 05-07-2014 09:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rick-slo (Post 3944724)
3:1 rule does not apply to recording solo guitar. One earlier thread http://www.acousticguitarforum.com/f...d.php?t=282231

Hi Rick,
Thanks for the link to the thread discussing the 3:1 rule relative to micing acoustic guitars. I appreciate the contributions from you guys that really know what you are talking about; it allows me to absorb some of the theory and practical issues relative to recording.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:13 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, The Acoustic Guitar Forum

vB Ad Management by =RedTyger=