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-   -   Know of any other "Same instrument, different famous song" instances? (https://www.acousticguitarforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=563143)

PorkPieGuy 11-08-2019 11:25 AM

Know of any other "Same instrument, different famous song" instances?
 
I heard on the radio today that "Bohemian Rhapsody" and "Hey Jude" were recorded on the same piano. I went back and listened, and sure enough they sound the same to me.

There's also the legend of "Excalibur" which is a certain Taylor 514 guitar:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ou_WwEWSy5g

There's also Hal Blaine's drum set(s) (combo Ludwigs and Blaemire shells) that was featured of hundreds, if not thousands, of hit songs.

Anyone know of any shared instruments on popular songs? I find this kind of thing interesting.

colchar 11-08-2019 11:29 AM

Considering studio musicians at famous studios (Motown, Muscle Shoals, etc.) there will be thousands of songs recorded on the same instruments.

RussL30 11-08-2019 11:34 AM

The piano at RCA studio B in Nashville has been used in a lot of hit songs. I got to sit at it and take a photo on a tour a few years ago and I definitely get inspired just thinking about the people that have played it and the songs that came out of it.

warfrat73 11-08-2019 11:40 AM

Pretty much everything Tony Rice ever recorded was on Clarence's old D-28 that he played on Sweetheart of the Rodeo among other things.

foxo 11-08-2019 11:42 AM

Neil Young / Hank Williams D28, probably too many songs to mention.

frankmcr 11-08-2019 12:19 PM

James Jamerson's 1961 P-bass, SN 60228.

BoneDigger 11-08-2019 12:33 PM

I suspect that many of the great guitarists wrote and performed many songs on the same guitar. Clapton,Hendrix, SRV, Knopfler, etc.

beatcomber 11-08-2019 12:56 PM

I seem to recall that the Zombies used the Beatles' Mellotron while recording the "Odessey and Oracle" album at Abbey Road in '67.

PorkPieGuy 11-08-2019 01:16 PM

Thanks for everyone's replies!

I was thinking more of different artists using the same instrument, but this is ok too. :)

I probably messed up with my Hal Blaine comment.

BoneDigger 11-08-2019 01:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PorkPieGuy (Post 6206249)
Thanks for everyone's replies!

I was thinking more of different artists using the same instrument, but this is ok too. :)

Ah, I see. Well, probably one good example would be Tony Rice's D28 which was owned by Roland and Clarence White. There are lots of other examples of famous guitars being purchased and played by someone else after a musician's death.

Ozzy the dog 11-08-2019 01:57 PM

Can we have same band - different artist?

George Harrison used a Gibson SG for Revolver album and tour. John Lennon is reported to have used the same SG for the White album.

frankmcr 11-08-2019 02:05 PM

Somewhat relevant, or at least interesting, in an acoustic guitar sort of way
 
Paganini's guitar, which he gave to Berlioz.

Autographed :eek: by both.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...round_1830.jpg

RP 11-08-2019 02:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by colchar (Post 6206158)
Considering studio musicians at famous studios (Motown, Muscle Shoals, etc.) there will be thousands of songs recorded on the same instruments.

How about The Wrecking Crew???

The Wrecking Crew was a loose collective of session musicians based in Los Angeles whose services were employed for thousands of studio recordings in the 1960s and 1970s, including several hundred Top 40 hits. The musicians were not publicly recognized in their era, but were viewed with reverence by industry insiders. They are now considered one of the most successful and prolific session recording units in music history.

The unit coalesced in the early 1960s as the de facto house band for Phil Spector and helped realize his Wall of Sound production style. They subsequently became the most requested session musicians in Los Angeles, playing behind many popular recording artists including Jan and Dean, Sonny & Cher, the Mamas and the Papas, the 5th Dimension, Frank Sinatra, and Nancy Sinatra. The musicians were sometimes used as "ghost players" on recordings credited to rock groups, such as the Byrds' debut rendition of Bob Dylan's "Mr. Tambourine Man" (1965), the first two albums by the Monkees, and the Beach Boys' 1966 album Pet Sounds.

The Wrecking Crew's contributions to so many hit recordings went largely unnoticed until the publication of Blaine's memoir and the attention that followed. Keyboardist Leon Russell and guitarist Glen Campbell were members who became popular solo acts, while Blaine is reputed to have played on more than 140 top-ten hits, including approximately 40 number-one hits. Other musicians who formed the unit's ranks were drummer Earl Palmer, saxophonist Steve Douglas, guitarist Tommy Tedesco, and keyboardist Larry Knechtel, who became a member of Bread. Blaine and Palmer were among the inaugural "sidemen" inductees to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2000, and the entire Wrecking Crew was inducted into the Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum in 2007. In 2008 and 2015 they were the subject of the documentary The Wrecking Crew.

KevWind 11-08-2019 04:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RP (Post 6206332)
How about The Wrecking Crew???

The Wrecking Crew was a loose collective of session musicians based in Los Angeles whose services were employed for thousands of studio recordings in the 1960s and 1970s, including several hundred Top 40 hits. The musicians were not publicly recognized in their era, but were viewed with reverence by industry insiders. They are now considered one of the most successful and prolific session recording units in music history.

The unit coalesced in the early 1960s as the de facto house band for Phil Spector and helped realize his Wall of Sound production style. They subsequently became the most requested session musicians in Los Angeles, playing behind many popular recording artists including Jan and Dean, Sonny & Cher, the Mamas and the Papas, the 5th Dimension, Frank Sinatra, and Nancy Sinatra. The musicians were sometimes used as "ghost players" on recordings credited to rock groups, such as the Byrds' debut rendition of Bob Dylan's "Mr. Tambourine Man" (1965), the first two albums by the Monkees, and the Beach Boys' 1966 album Pet Sounds.

The Wrecking Crew's contributions to so many hit recordings went largely unnoticed until the publication of Blaine's memoir and the attention that followed. Keyboardist Leon Russell and guitarist Glen Campbell were members who became popular solo acts, while Blaine is reputed to have played on more than 140 top-ten hits, including approximately 40 number-one hits. Other musicians who formed the unit's ranks were drummer Earl Palmer, saxophonist Steve Douglas, guitarist Tommy Tedesco, and keyboardist Larry Knechtel, who became a member of Bread. Blaine and Palmer were among the inaugural "sidemen" inductees to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2000, and the entire Wrecking Crew was inducted into the Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum in 2007. In 2008 and 2015 they were the subject of the documentary The Wrecking Crew.

You forgot to mention arguably one of most influential and one of the most recorded members who anchored the backbone of the rhythm section Carol Kaye on Bass Guitar.

Jim Owen 11-08-2019 04:38 PM

Seems that Gary Moore recorded a tribute to Peter Green using the Les Paul that Green used during the Mayall/Fleetwood Mac years.


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