The Acoustic Guitar Forum

The Acoustic Guitar Forum (https://www.acousticguitarforum.com/forums/index.php)
-   Electric Guitars (https://www.acousticguitarforum.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=50)
-   -   1st Pedal for Beginner (https://www.acousticguitarforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=565885)

3notes 12-07-2019 09:44 PM

1st Pedal for Beginner
 
I've played acoustic for quite some time(years) and have finally found an electric guitar that works for me. I'm really happy with the Yamaha Pacifica. Solid body electrics have come and gone over the years. I never dedicated myself to them. I am now. Love this guitar. The Larrivee is resting....

I consider myself a beginner on the electric although the learning curve with this guitar will be shallow. I'm playing some nice clean notes after like 4 days.

I have a Fender Champ 20 amp. I love it. There are a handful of onboard effects... reverb, delay, flange, wah, chorus.... and a couple others.

I'm thinking about buying a compressor pedal. Good idea or not.?? What was your first pedal/What should be the first pedal for a beginner.??

1neeto 12-07-2019 10:16 PM

Well that depends on what you want to use it for. Compressor pedal is great for sustain, but it also kills the guitarís dynamic range. Since youíre learning, I think Iíd stay away from compressor, that way you can train yourself be de dynamic.

Song 12-08-2019 04:39 AM

Compressors are one of the most often used signal processors in recordings and on pedal boards.
Hundreds of options and choices available.
Research... https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...mpressor+pedal

srbell 12-08-2019 08:11 AM

I'd suggest a Boss GT-1 as it has just about anything you'll ever need. Later when you've figured out your preferences you could change to separate pedals should you feel the need. The multi-effects unit gives you a great relatively inexpensive way to experiment with different effects and combinations until you get it all figured out.

Sonics 12-08-2019 08:54 AM

Some pedals do "wah wah", some pedals do "wow wow" (...a lower frequency) and some pedals do BOTH!
Look for true-bypass or buffered input on the spec. Personally I prefer opto-electronic technology, and a wah that indicates when it's on and the pedal stays in position when you remove your foot.

A wah in front of a distortion unit is a very potent tool...

keith.rogers 12-08-2019 09:49 AM

Compressor pedals are most often used for specific styles, like "chicken pickin', and IME not typical on most boards. My feeling is that they can make you lazy about developing good technique if you just stick one on to even out what you are hearing.

A good overdrive or distortion pedal will do some compression, attempting to emulate the natural compression that occurs in an overdriven/distorted (analog) amplifier. You can also get this in modern digital amplifiers if done well, and your own amp may also be supplying some compression with those built-in FX.

I'd second considering a good, entry multi-FX pedal. It should have tap tempo, e.g. for delay, tremolo, et al, and an expression pedal for the wah or any other FX that can use it - even use as a volume pedal for swells and the like. A good one can always find a place on your board. (And save you a lot of money!)

And, unless you are playing out and gigging, a collection of pedals is something that can be well emulated in a DAW if you do recording.

KevWind 12-08-2019 09:57 AM

My first pedal was Carbon Copy analog delay, by MXR

Dru Edwards 12-08-2019 11:30 AM

If you're using the onboard effects then I recommend getting used to what they do and then make a decision to buy a pedal. You may find that you enjoy delay but the onboard delay doesn't give you what you want so you'll choose that.

I'm a big fan of Overdrive but not sure how effective it would be in front of a solid state amp.

Sonics 12-08-2019 11:31 AM

If the OP is looking for a multiFX unit then version 1 or 2 sitting behind a wah pedal is all you need to rule the world. No learning curve or menu navigation, just knobs, switches and analoge goodness. These units are tiny and will fit in your gig bag or your pocket...if you have deep pockets.




Being analoge you can't store any presets, so you have to get down on your knees to change settings. As demonstrated...



...I believe RK has the solution to the above issue. He now uses TWO units!

DukeX 12-08-2019 01:34 PM

I'd rather put my money toward a nice tube amp. Learn how to play it. Then later decide if I want to add effects.

RoyBoy 12-08-2019 01:59 PM

Learn before buying
 
I'm going to second Dru Edwards' suggestion. Using your amp's built in effects, see which ones you like the feel of the most, then buy a stand alone pedal of it (it's going to sound better than the built in).

It also very much depends on what kind of music your into. Compressors are a valuable tool if you are performing (mine is always on), but unless your into country chickin' pickin', not necessary for playing at home. Also, good 4 knob ones are not cheap.

If you are into rock and blues, then you'll want to consider getting into a decent tube amp (not cheap either) and an overdrive pedal. Enjoy the journey!

3notes 12-08-2019 04:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by srbell (Post 6232975)
I'd suggest a Boss GT-1 as it has just about anything you'll ever need. Later when you've figured out your preferences you could change to separate pedals should you feel the need. The multi-effects unit gives you a great relatively inexpensive way to experiment with different effects and combinations until you get it all figured out.

Nice post. I'm not sure I'll go that route, I haven't looked. I appreciate your comments.

3notes 12-08-2019 04:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1neeto (Post 6232750)
Well that depends on what you want to use it for. Compressor pedal is great for sustain, but it also kills the guitarís dynamic range. Since youíre learning, I think Iíd stay away from compressor, that way you can train yourself be de dynamic.

Very interesting comment right here^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ I never would have thought that. Good point. And honestly, right out of the box, this guitar is dynamic. I can tone it back without issue but I learned today that the gain and volume controls are in good working order. Very impressive.

Sustain is a very integral part of what I play. I love sustain. I'm one guitarist and I don't know a lot of tricks to fill in the holes. So I use sustain. That's why I'm considering a pedal.

bmoss02 12-08-2019 07:21 PM

well I don't play electric (not yet anyway... still looking for that Tele:D) but I do play acoustic with effects. How I started was with a multi effects pedal so I could decide what I liked. Then from there you can upgrade to make a complete pedal board. There are several decent multi effects pedals out there in the 100$ range (zoom, digitech, some used Boss pedal...etc.) they might not be all too fancy but they can be a good place to start.

Hope this helps

1neeto 12-08-2019 09:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 3notes (Post 6233485)
Very interesting comment right here^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ I never would have thought that. Good point. And honestly, right out of the box, this guitar is dynamic. I can tone it back without issue but I learned today that the gain and volume controls are in good working order. Very impressive.



Sustain is a very integral part of what I play. I love sustain. I'm one guitarist and I don't know a lot of tricks to fill in the holes. So I use sustain. That's why I'm considering a pedal.


Main thing is to not use it as a crutch. Someone mentioned he always has it on when performing and thatís ok, since when you perform, your attack tends to be more aggressive in the heat of the moment, and a compressor will help keeping your playing more even in the mix. But I donít see the benefit of a compressor pedal while practicing.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:00 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, The Acoustic Guitar Forum

vB Ad Management by =RedTyger=