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hotroad 11-08-2017 10:23 AM

Jazz Chords Please
 
What are some beginner Jazz Chords for my new archtop. I have a jazz chord chart but there are too many to know which ones would suit me in playing simple progressions in jazz chord fingering. Keep it simple please.

Kerbie 11-08-2017 11:18 AM

Why not start with something like Maj6s? That's a very nice jazz chord. Jazz uses a lot of extensions, but the 6s are a good starting point. Ninths might come next.

Grinning Boy 11-08-2017 11:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hotroad (Post 5530634)
What are some beginner Jazz Chords for my new archtop. I have a jazz chord chart but there are too many to know which ones would suit me in playing simple progressions in jazz chord fingering. Keep it simple please.

I strongly recommend Walter Rodrigues Jr.'s recent course. It's $10 I believe. It's just what you're looking for. A great teacher and a really wonderful player and arranger

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dRMh8vqCDLQ

Wyllys 11-08-2017 11:55 AM

Better to ask for some typical progressions, I feel, then find the chords/inversions/fingerings you want to flesh it out.

Context tends to suggest or even dictate your choices of the above. Here's a link you may find of interest:

http://all-guitar-chords.com/index.php?ch=C&mm=7b5&v=0

And another link for context in applying/choosing from the above:

http://www.guitarcats.com/realbook-jazz-standards/A

mattbn73 11-08-2017 12:09 PM

Mickey Baker's old jazz method book is $8 on Amazon I think? Money well spent for some fun, simple archtop-worthy chord progressions.

guitarmac62 11-08-2017 12:20 PM

Iíve been dabbling with jazz on my archtops as well. I purchased a video course off of the Truefire website. Itís called Jazz 1-2-3 taught by Frank Vignola. Great starter course. He teaches 3 moveable chord forms and 3 basic rhythms you can use to play many jazz songs. They have many other courses as well.

s2y 11-08-2017 01:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by guitarmac62 (Post 5530802)
Iíve been dabbling with jazz on my archtops as well. I purchased a video course off of the Truefire website. Itís called Jazz 1-2-3 taught by Frank Vignola. Great starter course. He teaches 3 moveable chord forms and 3 basic rhythms you can use to play many jazz songs. They have many other courses as well.

That's where I started. Major 7th, minor 7th, and dominant 9th chords.

Bluemonk 11-08-2017 01:16 PM

The Joe Pass Guitar Chords book presents and organizes the go-to chord positions that are useful in jazz.

https://www.alfred.com/joe-pass-guit...rds/p/00-3319/

hotroad 11-08-2017 02:17 PM

Great ideas and enough to keep me busy for awhile. Thanks so much for the spot on ideas. Now off to some jazz chords.

Wengr 11-08-2017 07:47 PM

Look thru your chord chart, and focus on those chords using the 2-3-4-6 string set. You can play alot of chords in that style. Enough to play tunes. They are my Jazz cowboy chords.

M Hayden 11-08-2017 11:05 PM

Start with Maj7, Min7, Dom7, and then get 6ths, diminished, and altered. Those will hold you until you start getting into things like +5+9 chords and such....there are plenty of good fingering diagrams on the internet for those chords with root on 6/5/4th strings.

Mr.Bill101 11-09-2017 08:26 AM

http://www.jazzguitar.be/blog/17-ess...rds-beginners/

Check out this site. I bought a couple of their books and got on their email list and they are sending me free video lessons every week. They do come with a pitch to buy more but so far I have resisted as I can't keep up with what they send me for free.

mr. beaumont 11-09-2017 09:52 AM

Hey hotroad--

You're getting a lot of advice here, which is good, but there's some contradictions and stuff so maybe I can lend a little clarity...

For beginners to jazz, I reccomend looking at four chord types-- maj7, m7, 7, and m7b5 (half diminished)

Approach these looking at string sets 4-1, 5-2, and 6+4-2.

So here's some major 7ths to get you started...

Fmaj7: x x 3 5 5 5

Cmaj7: x 3 5 4 5 x

Gmaj7: 3 x 4 4 3 x

Then look at the process of how notes shift to create the other chord types. Then, inversions.

Here's a video I made ages ago that I think will be very helpful.


Steve DeRosa 11-09-2017 11:58 AM

Learned from this one myself back in the day, used to use it with my students:

https://www.amazon.com/Rhythm-Guitar...40_&dpSrc=srch

From Amazon's review:

"Commonly referred to as the 'rhythm guitarist's bible,' this innovative book is a system of guitar chord formation which maximizes power voicing while minimizing left-hand movement. Originally written by Mel Bay in 1947, this landmark publication was reissued in its original typesetting in 1973 to become the definitive text on jazz chords in private teaching studios and university jazz guitar departments around the globe. Mr. Bay's practical, analytical approach to the fingerboard produced this comprehensive system for learning full-sounding orchestral jazz guitar chords. This landmark text comes with an instructional online video."

hotroad 11-09-2017 12:02 PM

Always loved Mel Bay. Used to use his booklets in teaching acoustic flat top guitar. I will check this out along with all the other recommendations here. I just ordered this book from Mel Bay. I am still after the very basic beginning Jazz chords that I can use in a song progression. BUT I have not said that I want to use a flat pick doing this, not finger picks yet. So this is rhythm stuff.

Steve DeRosa 11-09-2017 09:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hotroad (Post 5532001)
...I just ordered this book from Mel Bay. I am still after the very basic beginning Jazz chords that I can use in a song progression. BUT I have not said that I want to use a flat pick doing this, not finger picks yet. So this is rhythm stuff.

Good news:
  • This book starts you off with the absolute basics - major and minor progressions that modulate through a variety of keys and fingerboard positions - to allow you to gain familiarity and proficiency, before introducing the altered/extended forms most players associate with "jazz";
  • Many of the chord forms use "skip-string" voicings - where strings would be deadened when playing with a pick - so although it's billed as a rhythm method IME it lends itself equally well to fingerstyle jazz, where "inside" voice leading and moving bass lines can be heard more clearly;
Excellent choice - I've been playing for 55 years and still refer to mine regularly...

hotroad 11-09-2017 11:31 PM

Thanks so so much to everyone who has added your input here. Its a huge help to me who has played acoustically for over thirty years but never played a single jazz chord. I am finding it an exciting new adventure to get into jazz music and my archtop which I have fallen in love with already.

tdq 11-10-2017 03:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mattbn73 (Post 5530786)
Mickey Baker's old jazz method book is $8 on Amazon I think? Money well spent for some fun, simple archtop-worthy chord progressions.

I had this book as a teen. I never made it past lesson 2 and it served me well for years, decades in fact, before I decided to push on into more advanced stuff.
What I'm trying to say I guess is Mickey Baker, +1.

MC5C 11-10-2017 08:35 AM

When I think of and play jazz chords, I think of three and four note chords, often with no root, and never in first position (no open "cowboy" chords at all, ever). If I play no root, that is because the root is implied by the harmony - like a V chord in a II-V-I sequence that I play as 3, b7, 9, 13. I focus on three and four note voicings because I can add a root bass note on the 4, 5, 6 strings pretty easily if I am playing chord melody. I probably focus on a few voicings, maybe three or four for each type of chord, and I substitute a lot. I may do a b5 sub for a 7th chord, Maj7 or Maj6 or even a 6/9 for any major chord, m7 for any minor chord, 9, 13, and all sorts for dominant 7 chords. Sometimes the melody drives the choice, many tunes have a b9 in the melody over a V chord, so I play a 9b5 chord instead of a Dom7 chord. It's been said that well over 50% of classic jazz tunes, particularly in the bebop era, were over blues changes of some sort or rhythm changes (I got Rhythm) so just learning some ways to comp through those two tunes is a great start.

One other thing - if you are playing from a fake book, keep in mind that a lot of those chord call-outs are way over complex and not needed. Look at the melody note, the chord position and play something that fits. Like if you have to play a II chord, that's minor and you can play almost any minor chord you feel like as long as it has a b3 and the other notes aren't closer than a full tone to the melody note. One other other thing. Often in jazz you leave a lot of space. If you have a II-V-I sequence over four bars you might play the II for a half note then rest, just pop the V for an 8th note in the second bar, and comp something interesting but sparse in the last two bars.

Chipotle 11-10-2017 10:38 AM

When I was learning back in the day, I got a handout from a workshop with a gazillion chord forms on it. The key (ha, see what I did there) was to learn 2-3 chord forms and where the root of each chord was. Then all you needed to do when you saw a chord on the chart was to find the root note and play that chord form. It was much like @mrbeaumont's video approach.

For example, you need a Gmaj7. Find the root G on the 6th string 3rd fret, and play the maj7 chord form with the 6th string root. Or find the root G on the 5th string 10th fret, and play the maj7 chord form with the 5th string root.

It works with chord forms that omit the root as well, as long as you remember where the "implied" root of the chord would be in relation to the chord form.

And like @mc5c says, you can often simplify. When you're starting out, e.g., any dominant chord can be a 7th, until you learn a few more forms to round out a 9th or 13th.

Wyllys 11-10-2017 11:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MC5C (Post 5532799)
Sometimes the melody drives the choice...

Sometimes???

amyFB 11-10-2017 11:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by guitarmac62 (Post 5530802)
Iíve been dabbling with jazz on my archtops as well. I purchased a video course off of the Truefire website. Itís called Jazz 1-2-3 taught by Frank Vignola. Great starter course. He teaches 3 moveable chord forms and 3 basic rhythms you can use to play many jazz songs. They have many other courses as well.

Frank Vignola rocks!

He's one of many folks on youtube that offer great stuff for what you want.

search youtube for "jazz starter chords" and i'm sure you can stay busy for days!

815C 11-11-2017 07:12 AM

Here's a jazz chord tutorial I uploaded. You can get a PDF of the tab/diagrams HERE. It's had over a million views and about 10k likes on YouTube, which surprised me, but maybe its a decent lesson.


love the guitar 02-08-2018 12:43 PM

I'll second Mickey Baker's book I for jazz guitar.
Another approach is to get a book with a lot of chords in it then:

1. On the 3rd fret of the Low E string (G), learn all the chords you can make from there in G.

2. Move over to the A string on the 3rd fret (C) and learn all the chords you
can make from there in C.

Now you accompany in all keys by sliding up and down the neck as needed.

3. Learn the chords on the highest pitched 4 strings to aid in soloing etc.

I'm self taught with the aid of a lot of books and videos (along with school
band as a kid). This approach will get you there.

As you find the chords in the book, listen to them...find the one's you like.

upsidedown 02-13-2018 10:42 AM

Here's something fun to mess around with. Look at the box at the top right. It pops up at the 20 second mark.

Oh, and you can slow down YouTube playback now, by clicking the tools button.

min7b5 02-13-2018 11:36 AM

I would find a good teacher in your area (or online) and tell them you want to go through Autumn Leaves in chords, a few different ways. It's a good study tune that has both major and minor ii V I's, doesn't really change keys, it's in a guitar friendly key.. But learn chords and everything else in the context of a tune (in my opinion you should read that sentence two more times). And just live in the one tune for a month or more, until you and everyone around you is ready to go bananas... Then later, as you do add new tunes, each will come together more quickly -ultimitly I try to get students to make a list of ten tunes to focus on for a year as a pretend set list... But if you are just memorizing chords by rote and playing them into thin air.... It's gonna take forever.

Bluemonk 02-13-2018 12:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by min7b5 (Post 5637988)
I would find a good teacher in your area (or online) and tell them you want to go through Autumn Leaves in chords, a few different ways. It's a good study tune that has both major and minor ii V I's, doesn't really change keys, it's in a guitar friendly key.. But learn chords and everything else in the context of a tune (in my opinion you should read that sentence two more times in load). And just live in the one tune for a month or more, until you're ready to go bananas... Then as you add new tunes each will come together more quickly -ultimitly I try to get students to make a list of ten tunes to focus on for a year a pretend set list... But if you are just memorizing chords by rote and playing them into thin air.... It's gonna take forever.

+1!

In jazz, chords are all about voice leading - each note of one chord leading smoothly to a note in the next chord. Chords in isolation don't mean a whole lot.

OKCtodd71 02-23-2018 05:46 AM

Check out http://www.jazzguitar.be/
the second line with lesson, chords, gear, premium lessons is a great resource with multiple modules of specific information. Also, if you register and join the forum, you can post questions about anything you need help with and likely get generous support and answers. Good luck.

wildisthewind 06-11-2018 11:55 PM

Since practical advice on voiceleading and the importance of context has already been offered, I'll just throw in a few of my favorites. See if you can find how they move to or from other chords.

B+#9:
Code:

7 x 7 8 8 10
B^6:
Code:

7 x 6 7 8 x
(for one famous usage, see https://youtu.be/htc7nJDyg_A?t=1m39s)

Bm69:
Code:

7 x 6 7 7 9
or
Code:

x 2 0 1 2 2
B13(b9):
Code:

7 x 7 5 4 4
Bm9:
Code:

7 9 x 7 10 9
or the more common
Code:

x 2 0 2 2 (2)
B^9(13):
Code:

7 x 8 8 9 9
(the only voicing I could find when learning https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rnv1qdi-lx0)

Oh and, recently, whatever this thing is:
Code:

7 x 7 6 6 x
- I think it's a B9b5 with the 3rd omitted (76766x) but I like using it in place of the F# augmented chord.

One thing to notice is how little-used the unaltered 5 is in jazz voicings. This is especially true on guitar, where it's usually the first thing to go when building a chord with multiple extensions ("color" notes, above the 7th). Also, basically everything in jazz has a 7th, whether dominant, major, or diminished.

jomaynor 06-12-2018 09:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wildisthewind (Post 5754790)

Oh and, recently, whatever this thing is:
Code:

7 x 7 6 6 x
- I think it's a B9b5 with the 3rd omitted (76766x) but I like using it in place of the F# augmented chord.

Yes, a B9b5. Or as an A+ added2. The 766 part is an A augmented triad with an added 2 (B note) in the bass which fits because the B fits into the A augmented/whole tone scale. Thus you could also move that same chord up or down by two frets (or four frets) and it would still sub for an A aug triad.


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