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-   -   What is 6/8 and why does it exist? (https://www.acousticguitarforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=528724)

ManyMartinMan 01-04-2019 10:34 AM

Barry, I'm sure you have it by now but, here is the most recent great example of 6/8 I can remember being released. Little Big Town "Girl Crush". It's not only a great example but it's easy to watch.....

https://youtu.be/JYZMT8otKdI

Johnny K 01-04-2019 10:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by beninma (Post 5938138)
Sleepwalk by Santo & Johnny was the song my teacher used to introduce me to 6/8.

It is a lot easier to feel the difference in accents in person than it is to try and explain it or understand it from a book or the internet.

That waltz feel thing with 3/4.. I think everyone understands that. 6/8 is not that.

Once you get it you can feel it listening to songs and can tell when they're 6/8 vs 3/4. If a song comes on in the background that is 6/8 on the radio or something it will catch my attention at this point.

Norwegian Wood was mentioned.. I agree that one is not real obvious with the feel/accents. I want to hear it as 3/4 when I listen to it.

The other instruments in a mix can make it really obvious. Drummer only accenting 4.. toms on 1-2-3 then snare on 4 then toms on 5-6 and maybe the bass player is accenting 1. That can really telegraph it.

I'm picking up my Gretsch from the shop today. I am going to work on this song this weekend. I didn't realize it was 6/8 until you mentioned the drum pattern. Hmmm...sounds like a one man band project for me. Your are correct. The drummer will telegraph a 6/8. he will also telegraph a 12/8 too if you listen for triplets on the hat or ride cymbal. I play the 12/8 on a lot of slow blues.

TBman 01-04-2019 11:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ManyMartinMan (Post 5938170)
Barry, I'm sure you have it by now but, here is the most recent great example of 6/8 I can remember being released. Little Big Town "Girl Crush". It's not only a great example but it's easy to watch.....

https://youtu.be/JYZMT8otKdI

That was good, :) thanks.

JonPR 01-06-2019 09:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by beninma (Post 5938138)
Sleepwalk by Santo & Johnny was the song my teacher used to introduce me to 6/8.

Good one.
Quote:

Originally Posted by beninma (Post 5938138)
The other instruments in a mix can make it really obvious. Drummer only accenting 4.. toms on 1-2-3 then snare on 4 then toms on 5-6 and maybe the bass player is accenting 1. That can really telegraph it.

Right. The snare sets the triplets in pairs: "1-2-3-4-2-3".

Even where the "1-2-3" might feel like a waltz (3/4), when those threes get set into pairs it's usually better to make it 6/8, so the quarters become 8ths, even if it makes the 8ths quite slow (much slower than an Irish jig).

The point being that the "1" and the "4" feel like the beats - like it's a slow rhythm "in 2", not a fast "1-2-3" in 3. Two bars of 3/4 is six beats. A bar of 6/8 is only two beats.

Here's an example of what I'd call a slow 6/8:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9muzyOd4Lh8
The bpm is 50 (beat = dotted quarter). Set the metronome to 150 (for the 8ths, or for quarters in 3/4) and it doesn't feel right at all! That's fast!
The alternative would be to make it 6/4, with a dotted half-note as the beat (dotted half-notes at 50).

vindibona1 01-08-2019 06:29 PM

Simple answer: Musicality and phrasing.

Obviously a lot of music has a triplet feel. So many ways to write it... 4/4 with triplets, 3/4, 3/8, 6/8, 12/8, etc. Each musical phrase tends to have a build of tension→ then release of tension/resolution of the phrase. Phrases build upon each other creating (metaphorically) paragraphs or entire musical statements (often missing in popular music).

While your brain is "wired" to 4/4 there are other duple time signatures that a common: 2/4, 4/8 as examples. And then there are other time signatures that can REALLY challenge some. Example: Allman Brothers Whipping post. You can call it 11/8 if you want or you think 3 measures of 3/8+ 1 measure 2/8.



...And then there's Dream Theater...



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