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-   -   New 00 Woodsman model Hatcher Guitars (https://www.acousticguitarforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=526844)

Mark Hatcher 11-09-2018 09:43 AM

Logo
 
I am sticking with the way I usually to my logo. I figure using a branding iron to burn my "H" into the wood is certainly making use of a very old technology!

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4826/...db9fd9b4_c.jpg

There aren't many embellishments on this guitar so when there are I am keeping them subtle. Like the bear claw figure in the center back graft;

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4823/...1e366767_c.jpg

Thanks for following along!
Mark

ross748 11-09-2018 11:52 AM

The deep thought and subtle creative input in this build is amazing. Great work Mark. Following along and looking forward to the finished product.

Mark Hatcher 11-10-2018 07:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ross748 (Post 5885830)
The deep thought and subtle creative input in this build is amazing. Great work Mark. Following along and looking forward to the finished product.

Thanks ross748, I am really enjoying this build and the research that goes into it!

Mark

Mark Hatcher 11-11-2018 07:29 AM

Ladder Back Bracing
 
Here is a picture of the back bracing going on:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4883/...87d17fb2_c.jpg

I typically do a very contemporary latticed braced active back but, the look and voicing of the traditional ladder back braces are more appropriate on this model's design. It will still be light and active and will be used to build overall tone balance for these woods and deep body design.


Thanks for viewing!

Mark

ukejon 11-12-2018 11:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mark Hatcher (Post 5885691)
I am sticking with the way I usually to my logo. I figure using a branding iron to burn my "H" into the wood is certainly making use of a very old technology!

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4826/...db9fd9b4_c.jpg

There aren't many embellishments on this guitar so when there are I am keeping them subtle. Like the bear claw figure in the center back graft;

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4823/...1e366767_c.jpg

Thanks for following along!
Mark

Awww Mark, you glued the H in upside-down. Such a shame...total disaster. Go ahead a finish the guitar and Iíll pay a deep deep discount to take it off your hands. Glad to help out!

jaymarsch 11-12-2018 11:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mark Hatcher (Post 5887145)
Here is a picture of the back bracing going on:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4883/...87d17fb2_c.jpg

I typically do a very contemporary latticed braced active back but, the look and voicing of the traditional ladder back braces are more appropriate on this model's design. It will still be light and active and will be used to build overall tone balance for these woods and deep body design.


Thanks for viewing!

Mark

Very cool photo of the back ladder bracing. Always appreciate your attention to detail, Mark.

Best,
Jayne

Poppa 11-12-2018 01:21 PM

Very cool Mark. When its ready to roll, pm me, I'll shoot you my address so you can send it to me for a complete review! Looking forward to it!

Mark Hatcher 11-12-2018 02:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ukejon (Post 5888197)
Awww Mark, you glued the H in upside-down. Such a shame...total disaster. Go ahead a finish the guitar and Iíll pay a deep deep discount to take it off your hands. Glad to help out!

Thanks ukejon, Glad to know youíve got my back! :)

Quote:

Originally Posted by jaymarsch (Post 5888216)
Very cool photo of the back ladder bracing. Always appreciate your attention to detail, Mark.

Best,
Jayne

Thanks Jayne!

Quote:

Originally Posted by Poppa (Post 5888286)
Very cool Mark. When its ready to roll, pm me, I'll shoot you my address so you can send it to me for a complete review! Looking forward to it!

Thanks Poppa! Glad Iím getting so much support on this build! :)

Mark

ukejon 11-13-2018 08:11 AM

Love the little clamping trestles....very smart.

Mark Hatcher 11-13-2018 08:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ukejon (Post 5888842)
Love the little clamping trestles....very smart.

Thanks, this helps keep the go bars from marring the braces or worse yet, a go bar can pretty easily pop off a brace and dent the top or back.

Mark Hatcher 11-13-2018 09:18 AM

Sides
 
Eastern Black Walnut is a pleasure to bend. It doesn't need a lot of heat so it's unlikely to be scorched. It also doesn't tend to crack on the outside curve or crinkle on the inside curves. Plus the bends hold well!

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1971/...12061672_b.jpg

Here the Mahogany heel and neck blocks are going on:

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1965/...211113e1_c.jpg

The back is radiused and here I am installing Spanish Cedar kerfing:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4866/...b1aba0ec_c.jpg

Meanwhile, lest you were to think I'm moving along all business as usual, I've also been researching, both materials and techniques for putting the neck together. I'm setting up and practicing the old style joinery that was once used to hold a headstock on.
Today a headstock is normally just cut out along with the neck. When thicker pieces of Mahogany started becoming available around the turn of the century the factories started using a one piece neck. It's a lot faster, and doesn't require much skill. The problem is that doesn't make for a very strong headstock because the grain is short on that angled head. Laminates on the top and back help sure all this up but, that's not how they used to do this. The stronger method is to use a separate piece of wood for the headstock. There are several ways to join the headstock. The best way is also one of the oldest, most time consuming, and hardest ways so of course, I'm going to get really good at this because it's also the coolest way!

It's called a bird's mouth joint for obvious reasons:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4805/...0873bc41_b.jpg

Luckily, I have a lot of previous experience making this type of joint from 20 years ago when I was making Cedar strip ocean kayaks. I used this type of joinery when constructing paddles. The thing I love about this kind of old joinery and some of the other old style wood joinery is the joints are hand fitted and there is a mechanical element holding it all together. In this case the joint is made tight enough that you can push the headstock down in until it tightens up with about a 20 thousandths gap. Then you hold a wood block to protect the headstock up top and bring it on home with a smack of a wooden mallet:

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1958/...2e3e1c18_b.jpg

As a craftsman I find it quite satisfying as I hone my skills mastering this art. The only question that remains is, do I really need glue for this to hold?


So no, it's not business as usual in the Hatcher studio!


Thanks for following along.

Mark

Mark Hatcher 11-13-2018 03:47 PM

Old Peterborough
 
It's funny how when you are concentrating on a particular subject so many related things seem to just come out of the woodwork. Such as this 1886 map of my town that I just came across. The view of the town is pretty much the view I would have from my home if there weren't a 132 years worth of trees that have since grown in:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4862/...7d173929_c.jpg

This would make a great background for a paper label inside a Woodsman guitar!

ukejon 11-14-2018 04:52 AM

Fantastic workmanship. Do you cut the female (neck) part of the birdís mouth joint first and use that to mark the angle of the male (headstock) piece? Or is there a template or specific angle of some sort?

Mark Hatcher 11-14-2018 07:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ukejon (Post 5889720)
Fantastic workmanship. Do you cut the female (neck) part of the bird’s mouth joint first and use that to mark the angle of the male (headstock) piece? Or is there a template or specific angle of some sort?

The headstock is angled at 15 degrees and the bird’s beak is angle is about 23 degrees taper and has about 8 1/2 degree tapered sides. I use basic templates to get me in the neighborhood then fit the joint by hand.

Mark Hatcher 11-14-2018 11:39 AM

Old Hog
 
I've been on the hunt for more 100 yr old+ woods to expand my selection for the Woodsman model. I just came across a number of 150 yr old+ salvaged wood Mahogany back and side sets that originated in the Central American country of Belize:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4901/...c5cda6a2_b.jpg

They are very hard sets with nice character and ring. I'm looking forward to making guitars with these!


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