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TBman 01-05-2021 09:31 PM

2nd hardest part about writing instrumentals
 
The hardest thing is the melody.

The second hardest thing is writing the "glue" between your A section, your B sections and the C sections (if used).

Lately I've just been finding a note, sometimes with a lead in, that just sort of resolves or suggests the resolution to the first note of the following section.

Every tune is different so studying my favorite tunes isn't a lock in for solutions, but I guess going back to take a look at what others do isn't a bad idea.

What do you?

rick-slo 01-05-2021 10:08 PM

A little picture I put together :)

http://dcoombsguitar.com/Guitar%20Mu...usicPuzzle.jpg

rwhitney 01-06-2021 12:37 AM

I usually sing a melody over the progression or improvise a melody on guitar or piano, then refine it later. I often like to write out the melody and then make the rhythms, especially, more interesting, less square, more syncopated.

I often extend notes that were originally shorter over the barline, which sometimes adds a non-harmonic suspension, more colorful and interesting melody.

Besides harmonic progressions, modulation, and melodic fragments, one way to tie different sections together is by maintaining the rhythm, or part of the rhythm, of one section into the next. This can be the rhythm of the melody or harmony as well as of the rhythm section. At least at first, then the rhythm can morph into something new. Especially if there’s something distinctive about the first rhythm to carry over.

ljguitar 01-06-2021 03:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TBman (Post 6596751)
The hardest thing is the melody.

The second hardest thing is writing the "glue" between your A section, your B sections and the C sections (if used).

Lately I've just been finding a note, sometimes with a lead in, that just sort of resolves or suggests the resolution to the first note of the following section.

Every tune is different so studying my favorite tunes isn't a lock in for solutions, but I guess going back to take a look at what others do isn't a bad idea.

What do you?

Hi Barry
If you think A=Verse, B=Refrain, C=Bridge, then how do you think of the Introduction, 1st/2nd endings, and endings/codas?

I tend to just use words (like intro, verse, chorus, bridge, ending). This is especially true if I'm playing with others in a backing instrumental role.

As to your topic…I don't find it difficult to transition/write between sections, and actually try different musical 'tricks' (sometimes deliberately less smoothly) to draw attention to them. I think of bridges as a place to wake the mind of the listener.

I tend to write chorus sections which flow right out of the verse, and chorus sections, though they often vary slightly in tempo (slightly) or meter (duplet to triplet etc) accents, and volume.

Bridges are fun for me to write because it's like adding spices to my cooking. Make it more punchy, or deeper flavored. I love contrast…change from choppy to smooth (or vice versa), take it to the high register versus first 6 frets, strummed versus fingerstyled, or add a harmony to the melody etc.

I have written bridges in the minor 5th of the original key, and then finished the bridge with the major V chord of the original, and dropped right back into the original melody in the original key.

There are just so many great transitions 'out-there'…

Have fun storming' the castle!!






Mr. Jelly 01-07-2021 09:42 AM

My favorites and the hardest for me is to come up with or find three choruses that make sense together as different sections. At least that's the way I look at it.

islandguitar 01-07-2021 10:11 PM

Hi Barry....yeah, studying others and just listening and or watching what others do can help spring something forward. I've found in several instances that a single unique chord, usually something both seen and heard can propel me with my own stuff.

I like Larry's suggestion of waking the mind up of the listener, and that's something I've intentionally done with my tunes.

Honestly, there are times when I just keep repeating that A section (or whatever) over and over, knowing that something will pop when the mood is right on a different night or a different guitar is used. So there's a level of needed patience, a kind of intentional "wait and see" in order to splice things together into something that seems to fit. This combined with some basic theory seem to help with moving forward.

Finally, I sometimes will take the treble string melody I've worked out and move it to the mid or bass strings and repeat it there. When Mau Lau (Joe Charter) was posting here I saw that he did that a lot with his music and so I look for when the moment is right to try that out.

TBman 01-07-2021 11:39 PM

I'll keep at it.

I really like slow haunting melodies, but I can't write them, at least so far. Once I finally get an idea for one I think getting the parts together might be easier than it is now. Hopefully the stronger the melody, the easier it will be. Then again, maybe not :)

j3ffr0 01-08-2021 08:43 AM

I use screws between sections instead of glue. :lol:

I usually don't have much of a problem going from one section to another... they usually flow pretty well. I do sometimes have some difficulty coming up with a good C section when I feel like the song requires one. In those cases I just keep throwing stuff at the wall and seeing what sticks. I often turn to theory.... look for a key change. When I do change keys it takes a little mental effort to figure out where and how I want make my pivots.... so I guess that constitutes working with fasteners. :).

Howard Emerson 01-09-2021 04:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TBman (Post 6596751)
The hardest thing is the melody.

The second hardest thing is writing the "glue" between your A section, your B sections and the C sections (if used).

Lately I've just been finding a note, sometimes with a lead in, that just sort of resolves or suggests the resolution to the first note of the following section.

Every tune is different so studying my favorite tunes isn't a lock in for solutions, but I guess going back to take a look at what others do isn't a bad idea.

What do you?

Hi Barry,
The second hardest thing for ME to do is listen to quick recordings of whatever I'm working on, and I know instantly if I'm blowing smoke up my keister, or if I'm onto to something.

If I'm NOT onto something, I delete it or forget about, with no remorse.

Of course that means that the first part wasn't considered enough.

Just because something is catchy doesn't mean it's good, or worthy of building a frame for so you can hang it on the wall to say "Look what I made".

HE

Blueser100 01-13-2021 11:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TBman (Post 6596751)
The hardest thing is the melody.

The second hardest thing is writing the "glue" between your A section, your B sections and the C sections (if used).

Lately I've just been finding a note, sometimes with a lead in, that just sort of resolves or suggests the resolution to the first note of the following section.

Every tune is different so studying my favorite tunes isn't a lock in for solutions, but I guess going back to take a look at what others do isn't a bad idea.

What do you?

I have a much easier time coming up with compositions on piano than guitar. Ideas seem to flow, and often start with just noodling on a chord progression. The melodies seem to write themselves. Not so much on guitar for me.


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