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Old 10-23-2017, 07:35 PM
3notes 3notes is offline
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Default Recording is Hard

Howdy folks...

A month or 2 ago I purchased a Tascam DR-40. I've nearly got the basics down. For now I'm recording myself playing a new Larrivee OM-40. I can say this guitar records much better than a Taylor 214ce I was using.

I have several instrumentals I want to get onto a CD. When I say recording is hard, it's hard for me. Too many mistakes in my playing.!! Oh well, just keep trying, right.??

The one other problem I have is... When I hit the record but and go live, I'm picking up my movements. I have to lean forward to reach for the recorder and when I wrestle back into a comfortable position to play, I'm picking up my movements. To a lesser extent, it happens when I stop recording, too.

Is there a way to delete this noise out.?? Can I avoid this noise if I record with a mic directly into the recorder.?? My guitar is acoustic, no pickup installed. Can someone recommend a decent stand that I can attach the recorder to.??

I'll leave at that for now other than to say, it's fun recording. When I record some of my strumming rhythms it sounds like there's a drummer. I'm happy with the quality of the recordings though if I had some experience around me it could probably get even better.

Thanks in advance for the replies...
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Old 10-23-2017, 07:46 PM
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Import your recordings into your computer. Use a DAW (on the cheap Audacity is free) to trim the recording to the start and stop points you want. Other software editing is possible of course.
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Old 10-23-2017, 07:56 PM
jim1960 jim1960 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 3notes View Post
When I say recording is hard, it's hard for me. Too many mistakes in my playing.!! Oh well, just keep trying, right.??
I rarely ever play anything through and love everything about the take. My preferred method is to run through a piece 3 or 4 times and then create a composite guitar track from the best parts of each take.

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Originally Posted by 3notes View Post
I'm picking up my movements. I have to lean forward to reach for the recorder and when I wrestle back into a comfortable position to play, I'm picking up my movements. To a lesser extent, it happens when I stop recording, too.

Is there a way to delete this noise out.??
Learning to control your body movements is part of the process. It also helps to select clothing that's less noisy and to choose seating that emits no noises. For what it's worth, you're not going through anything we didn't all go through when we started. Just keep at it and the improvements will come. And keep those bad tracks around so you can give them a listen in 6 months and hear how much better you've become.
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Old 10-23-2017, 08:13 PM
3notes 3notes is offline
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Thanks Jim. That's encouraging.

I'll need to gain the experience to do what you do... Do 3 or 4 takes and"grab" the good parts and "put them in place." Is that what you're saying.?? If so, I like that, a lot.

Can you tell me if I can do that with the Tascam or do I need to use a program, or "software" such as what slo-rick suggested.??

What do use to accomplish this.??
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Old 10-23-2017, 08:41 PM
Brent Hahn Brent Hahn is online now
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Once you've learned to sit still... that's when you discover that you also breathe.
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Old 10-24-2017, 06:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 3notes View Post
Thanks Jim. That's encouraging.
Recording is one of those things that looks easy enough until you try it. Little mistakes that we gloss over and ignore in a live situation become glaring problems when we record and realize we, and everyone else who listens, will hear that mistake over and over again and it's never going to go away if we settle for that take.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 3notes View Post
Do 3 or 4 takes and"grab" the good parts and "put them in place." Is that what you're saying.?? If so, I like that, a lot.
That's exactly what I'm saying. It's essentially cutting and pasting although doing so does create "pops" that will have to be fixed by cross-fading but that's not a difficult thing to do.

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Can you tell me if I can do that with the Tascam or do I need to use a program, or "software" such as what slo-rick suggested.??
I'm not familiar with the capabilities of your Tascam unit but if I had to guess, I'd guess 'no' based on what it looks like unless it comes with some kind of editing software.

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Originally Posted by 3notes View Post
What do use to accomplish this.??
I use Pro Tools but there are other choices out there. I'm not real familiar with all the other DAWs so maybe others can weigh in on their experiences with those. For your needs, Pro Tools would be overkill, not to mention expensive. I believe there are some free options out there as well, but I have no experience with those.
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Old 10-24-2017, 07:10 AM
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Well, at least you've noticed it's hard, which means you'll probably make good recordings in the future.

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Once you've learned to sit still... that's when you discover that you also breathe.
Quote:
Is there a way to delete this noise out.??
All the little noises you mention are usually taken care of by using a gate (which prevents them getting in).
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Old 10-24-2017, 07:34 AM
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I am a recording engineer by trade. Let me give you an idea of how the typical session works:

We tend to roll the "tape" and say, "You can start when you are ready." That means every take starts with noise, because until we give the artist the heads-up that the machine is on he is scratching and sniffing like anyone else. When he knows we are recording, if he knows what he is doing, he settles down, makes himself quiet, and begins playing. Once we have a take that we like we edit off the junk at the head and tail.

Editing is an aural/intellectual/tactile skill, something like playing. It requires hearing, analysis, and manipulation. The easiest way to learn it is to do it. Practice editing on bad takes. Just as there are a hundred ways to start a note when you play, there are a hundred ways to get from one note to another when you edit. The more you edit the more situations you encounter that require different approaches and the more techniques you master. That's how you become a better editor. Two things can help immeasurably: Doing on someone else's dime and having your career hinge on completion of the edit sitting before you.

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Old 10-24-2017, 09:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 3notes View Post
Howdy folks...


The one other problem I have is... When I hit the record but and go live, I'm picking up my movements. I have to lean forward to reach for the recorder and when I wrestle back into a comfortable position to play, I'm picking up my movements. To a lesser extent, it happens when I stop recording, too.
I record a lot in my living room on my grand piano. My bird, Larry, also lives in that room. Problem is she's so used to being out the only way I can keep her quiet is to let here sit on my shoulder when I'm playing.
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Old 10-24-2017, 09:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 3notes View Post

The one other problem I have is... When I hit the record but and go live, I'm picking up my movements. I have to lean forward to reach for the recorder and when I wrestle back into a comfortable position to play, I'm picking up my movements. To a lesser extent, it happens when I stop recording, too.
.
The OM40 is satin finished - you will have a harder time with your "movements" being silent because of that!

You could use the 0000 steel wool and non silicone based polish method to turn it into a semi gloss and help that out a good bit!
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Old 10-24-2017, 10:27 AM
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Several things which I have to attend to when I record:
-move the clock to another room so the "tic/toc" is out of there.
-turn my thermostat down so there's no chance of the boiler going on.
-turn off the fridge-
Also,
-wear a certain fleece top that makes little noise on the guitar
-be careful to place the wire from my headphones in a place where it can't bang against the guitar while playing
-steady my chair so that there's no "creek"

Oh yeah, and take a deep breath and exhale cause I'm not going to be doing much breathing for the next few minutes!
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Old 10-24-2017, 08:15 PM
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You have to practice recording. Just run the "tape" as you practice and don't worry about how good it is. Just do it weekly and recording yourself will become almost second nature.

This helps get you over "red light fever."
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Old 10-24-2017, 09:47 PM
3notes 3notes is offline
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Excellent replies. Thanks.

Couple questions... I'm recording in stereo with the option to go mono. Which is best.??

How far should the mic be from the sound hole.?? I've been recording with the mics on the recorder about 3 feet from the soundhole.

btw ... I was a little "quieter" tonight while recording.
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  #14  
Old 10-25-2017, 12:29 AM
Fran Guidry Fran Guidry is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 3notes View Post
...
Couple questions... I'm recording in stereo with the option to go mono. Which is best.??
That's absolutely up to you, your ears, your projected use. I think most of the experienced recordists around here probably record in some form of stereo, but a few months ago a very confident pro engineer with many well known recordings to his credit insisted that mono is the way to go.

Quote:
How far should the mic be from the sound hole.?? I've been recording with the mics on the recorder about 3 feet from the soundhole.

btw ... I was a little "quieter" tonight while recording.
Three feet is a wonderful distance for capturing a "you are there" recording, like a classical guitarist might prefer. Unfortunately that distance nearly requires a very good sounding and very quiet room along with a recording chain capable of plenty of clean gain. I generally record with about an 18-24" spacing and it's not unheard of to get closer. A closer position improves the signal to noise ratio with respect to room tone and recording chain self-noise.

These closer mic positions could very well benefit from some EQ in post to counter the proximity effect and performer noises can be more of a problem, but these issues can be addressed with practice.

Mic position relative to the guitar can be all over the map. 12th fret is one "aim point" as is the lower bout. Trying many different positions over and over, at different distances, is a big part of learning to record. With your DR-40 you also have two ways to arrange the mics at each position. It's stressful and boring and frustrating as heck - I have no idea why so many of us keep doing it (grin).

Fran
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Old 10-27-2017, 09:22 PM
3notes 3notes is offline
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Thanks everyone.

I want to put my mic on a stand. I can't find an "adapter" that can screw into the recorder which looks to be 1/4'' female. ...

How do I attach the recorder to a mic stand.?? It's a Tascam DR-40.
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