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  #1  
Old 04-20-2012, 12:43 AM
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talkgtr talkgtr is offline
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Default Poor man's Neck Reset?

I've got an old cheap guitar that could use more neck angle, though I'm not certain the guitar is worth the cost of a full neck reset.

I've heard of folks loosening the back seam and the neck block and reglueing with more angle.

I'm curious if any one is using this method, seems to me there was a page on Frank Fords site out lining this method.
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Old 04-20-2012, 02:40 AM
HighAndDry HighAndDry is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by talkgtr View Post
I've got an old cheap guitar that could use more neck angle, though I'm not certain the guitar is worth the cost of a full neck reset.

I've heard of folks loosening the back seam and the neck block and reglueing with more angle.

I'm curious if any one is using this method, seems to me there was a page on Frank Fords site out lining this method.
I would be interested in that
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Old 04-20-2012, 03:21 AM
stanron stanron is offline
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If your guitar has no binding on the back then this method may be worth it. I seem to remember Frank Ford's article pointing out that the back had to be recut for the binding and splitting also was a problem. The method of steaming off the neck and recutting the joint was seen to be easier all round. Of course Taylor's bolt on neck and shim methods trumps all others. Another option (useful if epoxy was used) is to saw the neck off, adjust the heel and bolt it back on. Not for the timid I suspect.
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Old 04-20-2012, 07:06 AM
Aaron Smith Aaron Smith is offline
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I look at your situation as a perfect way to experiment and learn how to do a proper neck reset.
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  #5  
Old 04-20-2012, 09:39 AM
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Kitchen Guitars Kitchen Guitars is offline
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Doing it right is the best way. But, a alt method is get a Japan saw, its a cheap flexible handsaw at Harbor Freight. Cut the heel to the fret board. Bend back the neck to check angle. If you need more angle slide in some sand paper and remove media till the angle you want is achieved. Use SLOW Epoxy to glue the angle in place.
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Old 04-20-2012, 09:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by talkgtr View Post
I've got an old cheap guitar that could use more neck angle, though I'm not certain the guitar is worth the cost of a full neck reset.

I've heard of folks loosening the back seam and the neck block and reglueing with more angle.

I'm curious if any one is using this method, seems to me there was a page on Frank Fords site out lining this method.
steam off the neck. it'll be easier. the slipped block method can cause deformation of the upper bout depending upon the severity of the neck angle correction needed. bad examples look horrible.

then there's the clean up work......
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Old 04-20-2012, 11:10 AM
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Howard Klepper Howard Klepper is offline
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The neck block reset is pretty much a lost art nowadays. Almost all those who condemn it have never done one, and likely most have never seen one--certainly not one done well. It's not the preferred method, but like most techniques, it has its place and there are guitars on which it is appropriate.

That said, it is not easy, and not a job for the inexperienced.
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  #8  
Old 04-20-2012, 06:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitchen Guitars View Post
Doing it right is the best way. But, a alt method is get a Japan saw, its a cheap flexible handsaw at Harbor Freight. Cut the heel to the fret board. Bend back the neck to check angle. If you need more angle slide in some sand paper and remove media till the angle you want is achieved. Use SLOW Epoxy to glue the angle in place.
Ah,.. I'll have to think about that. But I get the drift.

Thanks to all who took the time to respond!

Last edited by talkgtr; 04-20-2012 at 08:30 PM.
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Old 04-21-2012, 06:30 AM
laocmo laocmo is offline
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I once had a D-35 that needed a neck reset after only 5 years playing. In those days I was too poor or too cheap to have it done right. As an alternative the tech suggested a "heat press". He had made a clamp device that put a little reverse bow in the neck, then heated it until the fingerboard glue softened, and let it cool down to re-harden the glue. Worked great for me. I played the thing another 20 years and the action remained perfect.
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Old 04-21-2012, 11:32 AM
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The reason I was interested in the poorman's method was the simple fact that for all it's issues, this guitar sounds really good.

I wouldn't cut the heel to the fingerboard because I'd want to maintain the integrity of the neck joint.


Last edited by talkgtr; 04-21-2012 at 02:23 PM.
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  #11  
Old 04-22-2012, 07:22 AM
grumpyguybill grumpyguybill is offline
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Default Grumpy says...

If that sweet old gal can still sing....why risk any surgery?
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Old 04-22-2012, 09:30 AM
dbintegrity dbintegrity is offline
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Hey I have one of those favilla necks in my basement...never used or lacquered.... Come to think of it I don't even recall how I got it....
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Old 04-22-2012, 09:55 AM
pfox14 pfox14 is offline
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I wouldn't recommend cutting the back and repositioning the neck block. Not the best way to do a neck reset.
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  #14  
Old 04-22-2012, 01:00 PM
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If that sweet old gal can still sing....why risk any surgery?
Yeah, I may not. With old guitars my motto is do no harm. The bridge was shaved as low as possible, the saddle is pretty short, all done before I got it.

This was the last guitar my buddy Frank Moats sold, he owned Atlanta Vintage Guitars. Next day he went into hospice, couple days after that he left us.

If I did a proper neck reset, it'd would really need frets and maybe a new bridge since it's been shaved. I don't have the time or inclination, I've done two neck resets in my life, both went well, but they were stressful for sure. I'm just not up to it.

It may have to stay as is, it plays ok, maybe I'll learn slide.
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Old 04-22-2012, 01:16 PM
Zigeuner Zigeuner is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by talkgtr View Post
I've got an old cheap guitar that could use more neck angle, though I'm not certain the guitar is worth the cost of a full neck reset.

I've heard of folks loosening the back seam and the neck block and reglueing with more angle.

I'm curious if any one is using this method, seems to me there was a page on Frank Fords site out lining this method.
That is an old method. It was not uncommon to see such a job in the 1960's before regular neck reset techniques became more widely done. I've seen several guitars done that way and, from what I could see, it's not one bit easier than a normal neck reset.

The binding has to be removed from the area under the tip of the neck heel and the back loosened. This is tough to do because unlike a dovetail neck joint, there's no place to insert a steam needle. Thus, there is danger of splitting the back of the guitar and leaving an ugly crack.

Furthermore, once the new angle is set and glued in, it is necessary to trim the back down to match the upper bout on the back. That's almost guaranteed to do some damage to the finish. This is not a pleasant thing to contemplate. Then the notch for the binding must be re cut so that the binding will fit back in.

Also, assuming the job can be completed successfully, for the rest of the time you own the guitar, every time you play it, you will be annoyed to notice that there is an ominous angle of the neck heel to the top and back.

Unlike a regular neck reset, which can theoretically be repeated some years later if another one is needed, this method is a one-shot deal. You can only pull the neck block back so far and that's the end of the ball game.

It's not something I would ever do.
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