The Acoustic Guitar Forum  

Go Back   The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > General Acoustic Guitar Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 12-12-2010, 12:04 PM
jhsatt jhsatt is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 2
Default cold weather shipping

I wanted to ask this yesterday before the wheels were sent in motion, but my D-28 is on it's way. Coming from warm weather to Chicago. It will be a lovely 20 degrees here this week. How long before I open the box and see the damage if any? First post. Hello all guitar lovers! thanks Jeff
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 12-12-2010, 12:16 PM
Bluewyatt's Avatar
Bluewyatt Bluewyatt is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Nashville
Posts: 1,118
Default

I would wait until the box is room temperature. Then remove the case and wait until it is room temp. Then remove the guitar.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 12-12-2010, 12:23 PM
JimR's Avatar
JimR JimR is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: The Land of Enchantment!
Posts: 593
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluewyatt View Post
I would wait until the box is room temperature. Then remove the case and wait until it is room temp. Then remove the guitar.
I agree with this..I wouldn't risk opening it until the case has been at room temp for a while. And it needs to transition naturally to room temp without attempting to accelerate the process.
__________________
Jim
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 12-12-2010, 12:30 PM
MikeD's Avatar
MikeD MikeD is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: New England
Posts: 1,872
Default

To dovetail on this, when the box feels warm and you take the case out of the shipping box, wait for the latches to get to room temperature as they are a better indication of the internal temp of the case than merely feeling the outside of the case itself. Metal is a better conductor of hot/cold than wood or fiberglass, so once they latches and hinges feel normal you should be all set.
__________________
We can share the woman, we can share the wine...
_____________________
Suggestions 1:1
Slackers 1:51-52
FSM
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 12-12-2010, 12:31 PM
DB Cooper DB Cooper is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Michigan - middle of the mitten
Posts: 420
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jhsatt View Post
I wanted to ask this yesterday before the wheels were sent in motion, but my D-28 is on it's way. Coming from warm weather to Chicago. It will be a lovely 20 degrees here this week. How long before I open the box and see the damage if any? First post. Hello all guitar lovers! thanks Jeff
Welcome to AGF, Jeff! If you follow this 8-step process, you should have no problem with your new guitar!

1) First, place the box in an unheated garage, as far away from your home entrance as possible, where the ambient temperature is just above the outside temperature - leave it there for 12 hours.

2) Next, move it within the garage to a place near the entrance to your home - 6 hours there should suffice.

3) At that point, bring it into your home (still in the box, of course) and place it in the coolest part of your home - a basement or unheated attic would work this time of year. Leave it there a full 24 hours, just to be on the safe side.

4) Then move it to the living space of your home at least 15 feet from any heating vent - but don't open it! Another day there should get the box and its inner contents close to room temperature.

5) Now, very carefully, cut the packing tape and open just one end of the box. This will allow the cooler box air out and allow the warmer room air in - but perform this step with exact precision - you don't want to waste all this effort by taking a misstep here. Best to wait 6-8 hours.

6) Once you are confident that the box/room air is sufficiently mixed (time varies depending on latitude, humidity, air pressure, Zodiac sign, and amount of mojo), open the remainder of the box.

(Now this next step is tricky...)
7a) If the guitar is in a case, you must wait another 24-36 hours to allow the case air to warm to room temperature.
7b) If there is no case, you should be safe to proceed - with caution, of course.

8) Play and enjoy!

...

Last edited by DB Cooper; 12-12-2010 at 01:24 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 12-12-2010, 01:41 PM
bozz_2006's Avatar
bozz_2006 bozz_2006 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 1,569
Default

Is there a temp that is just too cold to ship a guitar in? It's been -15 to -20 here for a low the past few nights.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 12-12-2010, 03:26 PM
taylorcc's Avatar
taylorcc taylorcc is offline
Couch pickin' since 1962
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA
Posts: 1,317
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bozz_2006 View Post
Is there a temp that is just too cold to ship a guitar in? It's been -15 to -20 here for a low the past few nights.
There's no problem shipping guitars in cold temps down to minus 60 F or lower. The problem occurs if the guitar has a nitrocellulose finish and it is very cold and you warm it up quickly say by opening a cold case in a warm room. If you do this, the nitro finish will show cracks. It's cosmetic AFAIK but looks are important to a lot of people, including me.
__________________

2009 CA Cargo Raw, 2006 Collings OM-1 SS light build, 2004 Taylor 714ce, 2000 Taylor 310K, 1991 Martin HD-28, 1971 Martin 0-18, 1967 Guild F-30

2006 Ovation Legend 6756LX 12 string, 2004 Taylor 354ce 12 string, 1976 Guild G312-NT 12 string (dreadnaught shape)

1966 Martin T-15 tiple, Mele koa ukulele
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 12-12-2010, 03:32 PM
MikeD's Avatar
MikeD MikeD is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: New England
Posts: 1,872
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by taylorcc View Post
There's no problem shipping guitars in cold temps down to minus 60 F or lower. The problem occurs if the guitar has a nitrocellulose finish and it is very cold and you warm it up quickly say by opening a cold case in a warm room. If you do this, the nitro finish will show cracks. It's cosmetic AFAIK but looks are important to a lot of people, including me.
I've heard kind of the same thing over the years, but I still don't like to ship guitars in the winter unless I absolutely have to. I currently have a guitar that I shipped back to a luthier last fall for a new neck (converting it to a baritone), and since he's a little behind schedule with delivering his instruments, I told him to hake his time doing the job over the winter since I do not want to risk anything happening to the guitar shipping it when it's freezing out. Kind of a bummer that I have to wait another 3 or 4 months go get the guitar back, but it would be a bigger bummer if something happened to the guitar. On the bright side, the setup should be perfect and any issues that could arise should be taken care of since the builder will be using it as his personal guitar until it ships back... and more play time is a good thing, right?
__________________
We can share the woman, we can share the wine...
_____________________
Suggestions 1:1
Slackers 1:51-52
FSM
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 12-12-2010, 04:02 PM
McCawber McCawber is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Bella Vista, AR
Posts: 247
Default

Quote:
The problem occurs if the guitar has a nitrocellulose finish and it is very cold and you warm it up quickly say by opening a cold case in a warm room. If you do this, the nitro finish will show cracks.
I learned that the hard way back in the 60's when I was young and stupid (or stupider . . . ). I mistakenly left my then new B-25 Gibson in the car overninght in the middle of an Iowa winter after a late date. Knowing nothing about the effects of cold on lacquer (and Gibson piled it on thick in those days), I brought the guitar into the house and imediately opened the case. I literally watched and heard the finish crack. Sorta ruined my day.

A friend if mine has a Martin at the factory now for some warranty work and was informed they wouldn't ship it back to him in the winter.
__________________
McCawber

“We are all bozos on this bus . . . “


1967 Martin D-28 (Still on warranty . . . . ) // 1988 Guild J-65-12 // 2003 Martin D-42 // 2006 Martin D-18GE burst // 2004 Martin LX1 // 2006 Martin HD-28V burst // 2012 Custom Shop HD-28V // 1968 home made Mastertone // 2007 Stelling Bellflower // HJ-40 (under construction) //
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 12-12-2010, 04:08 PM
Tone Gopher Tone Gopher is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 1,803
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeD View Post
I've heard kind of the same thing over the years, but I still don't like to ship guitars in the winter unless I absolutely have to.
If you ship by air - or travel with a guitar in the hold, have you ever considered how cold it is at altitude?

I'd be more concerned about how hot a guitar gets while sitting in a truck during the summer time.
__________________
Go for the Tone,

George
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 12-12-2010, 05:01 PM
MrFaulconbridge MrFaulconbridge is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 27
Default

I also have a guitar coming but do I have to follow such a long procedure of waiting a set amount of hours in different parts of the house of what DB Cooper was saying? (seems abit extreme to me)

It has a Nitrocellulose Lacquer finish but can I just wait untill the box warms up, let the case warm up and then finally take the guitar out?

Does anyone know how long this will take? Im from the UK and temps around here are about 41 degrees Fahrenheit (5 degrees Celsius) outside.

Last edited by MrFaulconbridge; 12-12-2010 at 05:08 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 12-12-2010, 05:11 PM
JimR's Avatar
JimR JimR is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: The Land of Enchantment!
Posts: 593
Default

IR thermometers are not expensive and they can certainly take a lot of the guess work away. I use one.
__________________
Jim
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 12-12-2010, 05:18 PM
NewMartinFan NewMartinFan is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 993
Default

Martin won't ship a guitar if the temps along the route are less than 20. Most Internet retailers won't ship if temps are below zero.

When you receive a guitar in winter, simply put the unopened box in your house and let it acclimate to the new temp for 24 hours.

Have shipped and received numerous guitars during winter...no big deal.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 12-12-2010, 05:28 PM
random works random works is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Georgia
Posts: 2,265
Default

Err on the side of caution...then wait some more.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 12-12-2010, 06:04 PM
DB Cooper DB Cooper is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Michigan - middle of the mitten
Posts: 420
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrFaulconbridge View Post
I also have a guitar coming but do I have to follow such a long procedure of waiting a set amount of hours in different parts of the house of what DB Cooper was saying? (seems abit extreme to me)

It has a Nitrocellulose Lacquer finish but can I just wait untill the box warms up, let the case warm up and then finally take the guitar out?

Does anyone know how long this will take? Im from the UK and temps around here are about 41 degrees Fahrenheit (5 degrees Celsius) outside.
Well, if you're unsure, simply double all the times I stated...that should take care of everything...
Reply With Quote
Reply

  The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > General Acoustic Guitar Discussion

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Loading

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:12 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, The Acoustic Guitar Forum
vB Ad Management by =RedTyger=