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  #1  
Old 10-03-2008, 12:23 AM
bc guy bc guy is offline
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Default Sweet 3rd fret capo sound.

I've been learning guitar thru youtube lessons and books and I notice many people playing with the capo at the third fret.
I play a little piano and know some music theory and I understand the theory about capoing to transpose but there is also something about the sweet sounds at that fret.
I've been learning pattern/travis picking and I seem to keep playing capoed at the 3rd fret.Anyone else find this?
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Old 10-03-2008, 12:38 AM
ohwell ohwell is offline
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Originally Posted by bc guy View Post
I've been learning guitar thru youtube lessons and books and I notice many people playing with the capo at the third fret.
I play a little piano and know some music theory and I understand the theory about capoing to transpose but there is also something about the sweet sounds at that fret.
I've been learning pattern/travis picking and I seem to keep playing capoed at the 3rd fret.Anyone else find this?
I absolutely 100% agree with this. I've thought it for a long time and just thought of it again earlier tonight when I was playing a song with a capo on 3. There's something that just makes an acoustic guitar come alive when you're playing with a capo on the third fret.

After third, 2nd fret is close behind followed by 4th fret. There's probably some complex mathematical equation involving things likes frequencies and resonance and other big words that explains it, but I just like the sound. I could sit around all day long strumming with a capo on the third fret.
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Old 10-03-2008, 12:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohwell View Post
I absolutely 100% agree with this. I've thought it for a long time and just thought of it again earlier tonight when I was playing a song with a capo on 3. There's something that just makes an acoustic guitar come alive when you're playing with a capo on the third fret.

After third, 2nd fret is close behind followed by 4th fret. There's probably some complex mathematical equation involving things likes frequencies and resonance and other big words that explains it, but I just like the sound. I could sit around all day long strumming with a capo on the third fret.
Could not agree with you guys more. I ABSOLUTELY rely on my capo, and tend to use it most often in the 2, 3 or 4 fret.............If you watch some of MY heros...........Townes Van Zandt, Jackson Browne, Richard Shindell.........they do the same...................

Takes a well setup guitar and a GOOD capo, but it does make a guitar come alive for certain music.............
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Old 10-03-2008, 01:13 AM
anthonyd5189 anthonyd5189 is offline
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I also agree although I tend to capo the 1st or 2nd the most. I also put the capo on the 7th sometimes...you can get some good sounding stuff there as well.
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Old 10-03-2008, 06:42 AM
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I usually use it on the 2nd, with many travels to the 4th, 5th and 7th frets. I actually improvise a great deal with a capo on as the shorter scale created makes it easier on my hand.
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Old 10-03-2008, 06:58 AM
Magster24 Magster24 is offline
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Default Agreed

Not sure if ya'll sing too, but I find that playing songs in Capo 3 also provides a comfortable singing range for men...althought sometimes too high for ladies.

And if you wanted to keep a song in the key of G, you can still Capo 3 and play in E shapes; it sounds different because you can do a lot more open chords that way.

My 2 cents...
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Old 10-03-2008, 10:00 PM
bc guy bc guy is offline
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That's one that i'm learning by Jackson Browne--3rd fret capo!.....or is that 2nd fret?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tPk11...ture=rec-fresh
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Old 10-03-2008, 10:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohwell View Post
There's probably some complex mathematical equation involving things likes frequencies and resonance and other big words that explains it, but I just like the sound.
There has to be some sort of explanation. I actually hate playing my Tak without a capo. It isn't sweet and sounds out of tune. Capo it and it's a different guitar. I have had the nut worked and reworked on thinking the problem must be there (I still think it IS there). In the mean time I capo it...but mainly play my Tanglewood (LOVE IT!!!)

And Yes to the 3rd fret. It's really weird actually. Just last week a song came to me while I was capo 2 and I shifted it to 3 and WOW! It's a lot of weird Chords and they sound AWESOME when capo 3. They sound good at 5 but awesome at 3.

I thought it was just my guitar and just me...gotta be some math behind this. Something in the way the sound waves interact in that key.

Do you think if you tuned your guitar up to the key of G (with lighter strings!) the same thing would happen?? I know I won't be doing it as I require the E and drop D at times...just a thought.
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Old 10-03-2008, 10:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Elliott E Worby View Post

And Yes to the 3rd fret. It's really weird actually. Just last week a song came to me while I was capo 2 and I shifted it to 3 and WOW! It's a lot of weird Chords and they sound AWESOME when capo 3. They sound good at 5 but awesome at 3.
My favorites so far are C add 9 and C/G ,G/B ,sound so nice Travis-picked at 3rd fret capo.
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  #10  
Old 10-04-2008, 12:58 AM
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yes has a special flavor
capo in third fret is like playing a baroque guitar, a spanish 16 century vihuela
or a renaissance lute

Eblen Macari
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Old 10-04-2008, 06:10 AM
3rd_harmonic 3rd_harmonic is offline
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as a bare finger player, I also find the dynamics between my fingers and the strings change a bit when capoed up.... 2, 3, 4...even to 5 or 7. And since I'm the type that lets the guitar "take me places" as I'm playing, my guitar takes me different places when I'm capoed up than when I'm not. It's not just the sound; it's the feel as well. I especially love my Gibson J-150 capoed up. Sweet sweet sounds up to fret 5.
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  #12  
Old 10-04-2008, 09:42 AM
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One reason for a difference in tonal quality between a capoed and uncapoed guitar is that the open strings are effectively fretted identically to the fretted strings; i.e. they're pressed against a fret rather than the nut.

Not sure about an explanation for any particular magic associated with the 3rd fret.

By the way, I love the sound of my guitars capoed as well.

Regards,
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  #13  
Old 10-04-2008, 11:43 AM
coldbrew coldbrew is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smack View Post
One reason for a difference in tonal quality between a capoed and uncapoed guitar is that the open strings are effectively fretted identically to the fretted strings; i.e. they're pressed against a fret rather than the nut.
Then I'd think that a zero fret design would have the same benefit. I've never played one so I don't know... has anyone else?
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Old 10-04-2008, 11:51 AM
Andromeda Andromeda is offline
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If I remember correctly there once was a thread about how everyone loved their guitars capoed at the 2nd fret! The second fret is my favorite position. Watch Gordon Lightfoot, his guitar is almost always capoed at the second fret, or the third from time to time. Not only do I love the sound of a capoed guitar I use one more often than I don't. I'd be lost without one.
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  #15  
Old 10-04-2008, 12:20 PM
coldbrew coldbrew is offline
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My favorite capo-holic: James Taylor
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