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View Poll Results: Powered PA Speaker or Acoustic Amp
Powered PA Speaker 19 51.35%
Acoustic Amp 18 48.65%
Voters: 37. You may not vote on this poll

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  #16  
Old 07-31-2016, 01:42 PM
Nick84 Nick84 is offline
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Originally Posted by nhbiker1961 View Post
It depends on the type of gig. I am typically playing in noisy bars or clubs as an acoustic duo or trio where on other occasions there might be a 5 piece band. An amp by itself will not cut through. But you may be playing at quieter venues where it will work. Powered speakers I find heavy for acoustic shows, so I went with passive speakers. Some gigs I run 2, some just one. Some I run 2 mains with a floor monitor like the picture I posted. We fit all of this in a Chevy Tracker. I am running a digital Peavey powered mixer, very light.12 inch passive speakers, also light. Then when I go to a 3 peice with a percussionist, I have enough channels to mic is hand drums. This works for me. To me, the guitar amp does not have enough bottom end for vocal mics in these noisy clubs.
I think you may had misread the question. I already have a powered mixer and 2 passive speakers. I want either an acoustic amp or a powered PA to add as a monitor only. I may use for practice at home as a stand alone.
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  #17  
Old 07-31-2016, 01:49 PM
Nick84 Nick84 is offline
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Originally Posted by lschwart View Post
If you get an amp like a Fishman Loudbox Artist, you will be able to plug your guitar and your vocal mic into the amp and control the EQ and effects of each channel and the balance for either a small gig or for your stage monitoring, and in the latter case you will be able to send separate, direct, pre-EQ/FX signals from each channel to your PA or the house PA so they can be mixed properly for the audience. Depending on what kind of pickup you have in your guitar, you may find that having the amp behind you and off the floor on an amp stand of some kind is better for monitoring than on the floor in front of you pointing up.

If you prefer to take a monitor mix out of your PA, you can still do it this way with the Artist. Just use the Aux input, and it becomes, basically, a small powered speaker.

There are other amps with these features, so if you decide to take the amp route look for them.

Just one question about how you use the Stagepass: Have you tried setting up the speakers above head height and either completely or a little behind you? For most gigs that would be a good fit for a little PA like that (that is, not too loud), you should be able to get away with that kind of set up without a monitor and without feedback.

Louis

Thanks Louis. Yes in most of the places I play I do not need a monitor I can position myself in front of the speakers. My pickup is a Baggs M1A so I don't really get many feedback issues. I do play a monthly gig in a venue that is a very odd shape and the speakers are almost in different rooms to me! I really enjoy doing it but it can be a nightmare when it gets noisey.

That's interesting about using the aux input on a amp to work it as a powered speaker. I hadn't thought about that, makes the amp look a much more flexible option. Cheers
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  #18  
Old 07-31-2016, 02:19 PM
lschwart lschwart is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick84 View Post
Thanks Louis. Yes in most of the places I play I do not need a monitor I can position myself in front of the speakers. My pickup is a Baggs M1A so I don't really get many feedback issues. I do play a monthly gig in a venue that is a very odd shape and the speakers are almost in different rooms to me! I really enjoy doing it but it can be a nightmare when it gets noisey.

That's interesting about using the aux input on a amp to work it as a powered speaker. I hadn't thought about that, makes the amp look a much more flexible option. Cheers
A decent small amp like the Artist is just a very good, flexible, and streamlined way to complement what you've already got. The DBR10 that is recommended up thread is a very good device for adding a monitor to the Stagepas (in fact, it's a nice speaker to build a small acoustic PA around), but with a speaker like that you don't give yourself a simple way to cover small gigs and for practice at home. To use the one powered speaker for small gigs you'd want to add a small mixer, and at that point you might as well just use the Stagepas. Up on an amp stand the Artist will cover small gigs with just the one unit, and will operate as a perfectly good stage monitor with the Stagepas or a house PA.

One advantage, by the way, of using the pre-EQ DI outs of an amp to send signals to the Stagepas is that the Stagepass has a monitor out with it's own volume control, but it does not allow you to tailor the monitor mix to your needs on stage. You have to use the same mix you create for the house. That might be fine for just guitar and vocals, but it might not. This is more likely to be an issue when going into a house PA.

Louis
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  #19  
Old 08-01-2016, 05:59 AM
RockerDuck RockerDuck is offline
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I've played too many places to count; all sizes of rooms. No one system will do it all. Although I have a few PA 's, I can recommend you getting a small, lightweight powered speaker for monitor and supplemental Pa. The Alto TX8 weighs 12lbs and a little bigger than a football, and is surprising loud, $129. I just played a church function yesterday morning. I arrived and found the PA was a Alto Tx10, $169. It was loud enough for two acoustics for over 100 people. Normally, I would bring my Bose L1c, but out of state gigs supply my PA.
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  #20  
Old 08-02-2016, 02:25 PM
Nick84 Nick84 is offline
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I think this poll/post has kind of shown there isn't a one size fits all solution for every scenario. Thanks everyone for their inputs.

I've bought a Marshall AS50D acoustic amp which I've tried and seems a really great amp for the price (a tiny bit more than a loudbox mini)

At weekend I'm going to a audio and PA specialist about 100 miles from me but they have a huge selection and demo area so I'm going to pick up a powered speaker too.
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  #21  
Old 01-05-2017, 05:16 AM
ChrisDowning ChrisDowning is offline
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Default PA vs Amp vs PA+Amp

Seems one thread is probably not enough for the topic. Depends on how loud you want to be and what gear you already have. An acoustic amp with a mic running into it will probably get you through a 40 person gig/room. With a PA you can do as much as you like - with the proviso about volume - with a room of say 250 you can probably set up the PA either side and just behind you so no need to have an amp as a monitor. But get in the same room and want to be real loud - i.e. the difference between 250 people sat listening and 250 people buying beer and talking as well as listening - then you'll need a PA, and an acoustic amp that will be used as a monitor.

Bottom line - get a PA for playing out - learn to move the speakers fwd when you need it louder - only use a monitor acoustic amp if you have difficult acoustics at the gig you do. Playing at home - get a quality 40 watt acoustic amp and a good condenser mic.

I've played out a lot and I feel less is better. We always seemed to me to play better without speakers everywhere and three miles of cable! But hey, sometimes the audience is outside and two hundred yards away - a whole new set up!!
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  #22  
Old 01-07-2017, 05:18 PM
Thoughtfree Thoughtfree is offline
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A single Yamaha DXR8 powered speaker on a stand, with a 4-channel mixer, works great for my two vocals/one guitar duo. 2-way with one 8" speaker and a horn, and 1100 watts of power. Loud and good-sounding - we put it behind/to the side, so no need for a monitor. One of the best gear purchases I've ever made.
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  #23  
Old 01-08-2017, 05:33 PM
SteveA SteveA is offline
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Both......Here's what I do with amazing results

I took my Fishman Loudbox Performer to a whole other level....

I am a worship leader & solo musician who plays acoustic guitar & keyboards. I sequence songs on keyboard & play live acoustic guitars through this sound system.

This is my set up for a medium sized Church.....

Fishman Loudbox Performer http://www.musiciansfriend.com/ampli...chTerm=fishman

Harbinger L1402 FX 14 channel mixer http://www.musiciansfriend.com/pro-a...eview?pfm=ac-a

Harbinger M350 PA stand alone http://www.musiciansfriend.com/pro-a...with-subwoofer

Harbinger Var 2115 Speakers (set of 2) http://www.musiciansfriend.com/pro-a...ed-loudspeaker

I go right out from the Harbinger mixer to the Harbinger M350, which is a line array stand alone PA...I then go left out to 2 daisy chained Harbinger Vari 2115's.

I use my Fishman Loudbox Performer direct out into the system, so my Taylor & Breedlove acoustics sound outta this world with 4 speakers....Each guitar is EQ'd separately on the Fishman as they are different beasts.....When I play the acoustics with this system I am simply blown away....

An absolute rockin' system...........
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  #24  
Old 01-10-2017, 08:50 PM
Laughingboy68 Laughingboy68 is offline
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In your situation, I think an amp gives you more flexibility and will be a more satisfactory solution.

I use a mixer into powered speaker setup for FOH and use a Fishman Loudbox Artist as my monitor. It works well on its own if I'm playing someplace small that doesn't need my full PA.
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  #25  
Old 01-10-2017, 09:15 PM
M Hayden M Hayden is offline
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Amps are flexible, but a small mixer and a pair of powered speakers has so many options - two mains, one main/one monitor, more channels, a greater range of options for audience sound. It's a little heavier but definitely worth it for me.
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  #26  
Old 01-11-2017, 01:12 AM
maxtheaxe maxtheaxe is offline
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The problem I see with using an acoustic guitar amp as a stage monitor apart from the PA system is that the guitar sound you would be hearing would be somewhat different from what's going through your mains. All amps add their own particular coloration and while power amps designed for sound reinforcement are by nature much more accurate in their reproduction, guitar/acoustic amps are tailored for the instrument, have speakers designed for guitar, etc.

If it happens that you have an acoustic guitar amp that gets the exact sound you want, then hopefully it has a line output jack so you can line it out to your mixer to get close to that sound in the mains...or if all else fails, then mike it up.

Incidentally, that Yamaha StagePas unit strikes me as nice quality, cool piece of gear, but I don't know what it has in the way of aux buses, sub outputs, etc. for running outboard gear or separate monitor systems.

If you're running your guitar or preamp directly into the board, I would favor a powered monitor that gets it's signal from the board, through a monitor bus or subs.

The drummer in my classic rock band, who was having trouble hearing our vocals (he doesn't sing, but needs to be able to hear those cues) ordered a couple of inexpensive Behringer 10" powered speakers from Sweetwater. They're surprisingly decent quality speakers for the price...not too noisy and plenty loud (300w) and clear for near-field monitoring. In pairs they could even be used as mains for a smaller venue, coffee-house type thing but for your purposes you'd only really need one, and maybe a stand for it.
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  #27  
Old 01-11-2017, 10:35 AM
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You're going to get a lot of recommendations. I see you have three potential paths.

1. Solve your stated problem using the Yamaha system you currently have. The benefit is that you already have the vocal and guitar processing you need and you're satisfied with the PA performance. In this case, you can purchase a small quality wedge monitor and go on about your business. This costs a few hundred dollars and will solve your stated problem.

2. Attempt to consolidate your guitar and vocal effects processing by adding a multi channel amplifier as your pre-processing unit and then send that DI signal to your yamaha. I think this could work, but I think you just cause more trouble. You'll probably still need your effects unless you get a Line 6 or amp with acoustic modeling built in. This will cost $1000 and might not solve your stated problem without adding complications.

3. Upgrade the whole system to one of the solo artist systems that performs as a capable house system AND a monitor by placing it behind the player. Fishman, Bose L1, JBL, etc. These can be used with your current preamps and vocal effects. You simply replace the Yamaha system. You can also buy the more capable systems like the Bose with the T1 mixer that will replace all your gear and pedals. This will be a $1,000 to $3,000 endeavor depending on the amount of power and features you need.

To me, it sounds like you should look at a quality wedge monitor and enjoy the system you have, unless you want to jump to no 3.

EDIT: I see you already made your decision.
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  #28  
Old 01-11-2017, 02:12 PM
Nick84 Nick84 is offline
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Thanks for the recent replies everyone. I solved this problem back in August by purchasing a Marshall ASD50 amp and an additional microphone stand to mount my FX150 on so I'm sorted for both scenarios now.
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