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  #1  
Old 01-08-2017, 03:48 PM
SnowManSnow SnowManSnow is offline
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Default First time bending wood binding

I'll be attempting to bend some curly maple , I know not the easiest because of the curl.
I'll be using a bending iron to do the task with.

From what I've read I'm to spritz the strip then gently place on the iron and b me to shop...

To me it seems simple but I'm sore, as with all building steps there is a LOT more to it that takes decades and decades to perfect.

Any preliminary hints? I have books and YouTube, but no experience yet.

Thanks


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  #2  
Old 01-08-2017, 04:24 PM
dekutree64 dekutree64 is offline
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Buy extra. Use the broken ones for practice. Don't expect to get all 4 strips done in one session (some people can do them all at once taped together, but every time I try it, they all start twisting different directions). Wet paper towel on the pipe usually helps with maple.

One nice thing about curly maple is that it's more flexible than most woods, so a bit of clamping pressure will make it conform even if the bend isn't perfect. Super stiff woods like Honduran rosewood and purpleheart have to be bent flawlessly because they won't flex at all afterward, unless you make the binding very thin. 1.5mm curly maple is very friendly. I prefer the look of 2mm or thicker, but thin is an option if you want to make it easier.

Last edited by dekutree64; 01-08-2017 at 04:33 PM.
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  #3  
Old 01-08-2017, 05:33 PM
clinchriver clinchriver is offline
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It really depends on your wood, I've had curly Maple that you could almost tie in a knot, and some that broke if you looked at it the wrong way. Most is fairly easy to bend and its a feel thing good luck
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  #4  
Old 01-08-2017, 05:46 PM
redir redir is offline
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I just did some myself which broke twice. If it breaks then get a backer piece of wood or something flexible to press real hard on the broken area as you try and get the bend in. OF course that depends on the break too, I'm talking about a crack not a total break off.
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  #5  
Old 01-08-2017, 06:04 PM
Truckjohn Truckjohn is offline
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If you haven't done much bending yet - start with some thin narrow clear straight grained maple stock and practice on that. Once you can easily bend that to shape - try some of your curly maple.

I would buy more than you need.... Maybe double so you have some to use on your guitar after you break a piece or 2 while getting the feeling of the stuff.
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  #6  
Old 01-08-2017, 06:58 PM
Rudy4 Rudy4 is offline
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Whenever I bend binding I spritz the wood, bend over the iron, but most importantly, back up the bend using a thin piece of aluminum flashing about 12" long that has wood handles attached to it. The strap allows full support of the outside of the curve as the binding is bent and prevents cracking or fracturing. I very seldom have any trouble with wood binding, even ebony, if it's supported by this strap as it is bent.

As always, you need a bit of practice on scrap before you bend the stuff you've spent time picking out and preparing.
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Old 01-08-2017, 11:45 PM
Richie H Richie H is offline
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All of the above. Like Charles said: Curly Maple for instance can be difficult to bend. I went through 4 pieces before I got the hang of it, after some practice runs with plain maple. So +1 for the buying extra part!
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  #8  
Old 01-09-2017, 08:31 AM
emmsone emmsone is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dekutree64 View Post
Buy extra. Use the broken ones for practice. Wet paper towel on the pipe usually helps with maple.
This!!!!!!^^^^^^^

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rudy4 View Post
......but most importantly, back up the bend using a thin piece of aluminum flashing about 12" long that has wood handles attached to it. The strap allows full support of the outside of the curve as the binding is bent and prevents cracking or fracturing....
And this!^^^^^^

If I learned anything from my attempts to bend bloodwood, (not maple, but another annoying to bend binding material) it was buy extra binding pieces! I broke 6 pieces and they broke no matter how careful I was. I ended up using some of the broken pieces as binding for the fretboard and the rest as practice.

I tried the wet towel on the iron, which was a method I liked, but I found I really had to pay attention to how wet it was to make it consistent and to stop it burning on the inside. I also tried bending without the towel, I used a paintbrush to wet the area of the binding I was bending, it stopped me going through a whole bottle of water with spray per binding. Also use HOT water, such a small thing, but it means the iron only has to heat the wood, not the wood and the water, means the heat gets in quicker and it becomes "pliable" faster and reduces burning of the wood.
I didnt have a metal strap, but just a small piece of wood on the outside of the binding did the job for me keeping the binding from cracking.

Hope thats helpful.
Dave
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  #9  
Old 01-09-2017, 09:54 AM
hat hat is offline
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I might suggest two things.
1. If it's got a lot of curl, you might want to soak it rather than just spritzing it. It can, and will, split at the curl lines in a tight bend.
2. Be sure to keep it moving across the iron. You don't want to scorch it.
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  #10  
Old 01-09-2017, 11:36 AM
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Howard Klepper Howard Klepper is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowManSnow View Post
From what I've read I'm to spritz the strip then gently place on the iron and b me to shop...
Seems like the rest of you guys understand what the "b me to shop" procedure is? I confess to being behind the times on usage.

OP, you ought to use a metal backing strip.
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  #11  
Old 01-09-2017, 11:42 AM
SnowManSnow SnowManSnow is offline
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This is the downside of using a phone. I have no idea what that means . Apparently my device "corrected" something


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  #12  
Old 01-09-2017, 11:44 AM
redir redir is offline
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LOL I had no idea what that meant either....

I would not recommend soaking though. I have done that and they practically fell apart. I have never used Supersoft but perhaps you might want to look into that as well.
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  #13  
Old 01-09-2017, 11:44 AM
dekutree64 dekutree64 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Howard Klepper View Post
Seems like the rest of you guys understand what the "b me to shop" procedure is? I confess to being behind the times on usage.
I'm guessing that was supposed to be "bend to shape".
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  #14  
Old 01-09-2017, 12:07 PM
Rudy4 Rudy4 is offline
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"bend to shape" was my interpretation, too. As more folks use phones to communicate on forums it becomes increasingly necessary to make your best educated guess as to what's posted.

If the original poster doesn't noun what was originally paistied then it's anti-body guest.
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  #15  
Old 01-09-2017, 01:17 PM
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murrmac123 murrmac123 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rudy4 View Post
"bend to shape" was my interpretation, too. As more folks use phones to communicate on forums it becomes increasingly necessary to make your best educated guess as to what's posted.

If the original poster doesn't noun what was originally paistied then it's anti-body guest.
I never use a phone to post on the internet, but am I to assume that there is no facility on a phone to proof-read the message before it gets posted?
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