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  #1  
Old 12-28-2016, 04:02 PM
Paulito Paulito is offline
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Default Recommendations for beginners classical guitar literature?

Hello, caballeros!

I have recently started playing guitar after a very smooth transition from percussion to drums. To keep this short (longer story will be in introduction that will be present within 16 hours)

I am looking for THREE classical guitar books for BEGINNERS


The subjects I have in mind are:

1) Classical guitar form (fingers, technique....., theory, or setup, perhaps?)

2) Classical music for guitar, beginner

3) Progressive sight reading (theory, exercises, or whatever is possible!)



I can read rhythms very well as I am a percussionist but I lack the fast recognition of melodic notes. FACE, ACEG, EGBDF, etc.

Thanks guys! I can't wait to get started!
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  #2  
Old 12-28-2016, 04:10 PM
cmd612 cmd612 is offline
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Default one book

Frederick Noad's Solo Guitar Playing, Book 1

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  #3  
Old 12-28-2016, 04:10 PM
mtdmind mtdmind is offline
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Try "Sight Reading for the Classical Guitar" by Robert Benedict. Vol. 1 is Levels 1 to 3. Vol. 2 is Levels 4 and 5.

Also Carcassi's 25 Studies are good as well as Milan's 6 Pavanes.
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Old 12-29-2016, 10:05 AM
dkstott dkstott is offline
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I highly recommend Scott Tennant's book and DVD Pumping Nylon. It's got great beginner and intermediate level exercises.
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  #5  
Old 01-05-2017, 04:31 AM
Bobbio84 Bobbio84 is offline
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I would look up some studies from the big classical era composers... Sor, Giuliani, Carcassi etc... They're stuff is tolerable when in the learning stages I.e. it's not just repetitive exercises, but makes sense musically. You can probably find most of it free somewhere online.

Someone already mentioned Frederic Noad, but I would also look at his stuff too.
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  #6  
Old 01-05-2017, 05:12 AM
wildpikr wildpikr is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cmd612 View Post
Frederick Noad's Solo Guitar Playing, Book 1

Welcome to the AGF!
Paulito,

I agree with cmd612.

You can also get CD's for this book. The exercises have both the 'teacher' and 'student' parts to play along with...good for a self-taught format to learn at your own pace.
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Old 02-17-2017, 04:15 PM
Semitone Semitone is offline
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A little delayed but here is my 2 cents...

I took a somewhat convoluted route to classical guitar. I had been playing electric for a while before I started traditional classical technique even though I had been playing some pick style classical pieces on a steel string instrument.

My first true intro to classical was the "The Christopher Parkening Guitar Method Book/CD Vols 1 and 2". I think these were a good intro to technique and some basic repertoire. I think these books, backed up by some youtube channels and lots of practice time, can get you moving along in the right direction.
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