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  #16  
Old 12-01-2016, 05:42 AM
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I've gotten through examples 8-15 working through them as written in the key of G. Once you get comfortable playing all of them separately, try playing them all in sequence without a rest in between. It's fun and a challenge and sounds pretty cool. I'll be going back now and trying these examples in other keys as the book suggests. I've also worked through the alternating pick exercises 1-8. Exercise 8 is a bit of a challenge but it's starting to feel "natural". This is a great book and study.
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  #17  
Old 12-01-2016, 07:06 AM
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I've gotten through examples 8-15 working through them as written in the key of G. Once you get comfortable playing all of them separately, try playing them all in sequence with without a rest between. It's fun and a challenge and sounds pretty cool. I'll be going back now and trying these examples in other keys as the book suggests. I've also worked through the alternating pick exercises 1-8. Exercise 8 is a bit of a challenge but it's starting to feel "natural". This is a great book and study.
That sounds like a fun plan. I have heard someone warming up going through things like that and it does sound very nice and is the basis for real songs, as we know.

Right now my hands can't figure out how to do the transitions and result in a chord shape. I'm spending only a small amount of time on it as I do have the Christmas program but I think I'm going to find a video that shows what I need to do so I can get a visual.
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  #18  
Old 12-01-2016, 10:00 AM
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Default NGD

I'm currently working through Vol 1. I've promised myself a NGD if I make it through Vol 8. Looking forward to a Gallagher/Collings/Martin reward.
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  #19  
Old 12-01-2016, 10:31 AM
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I'm currently working through Vol 1. I've promised myself a NGD if I make it through Vol 8. Looking forward to a Gallagher/Collings/Martin reward.
Or you could quit your job and just a be a professional guitarist, casting a long shadow of accomplishment on all who came before your presence.
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  #20  
Old 12-01-2016, 02:03 PM
reeve21 reeve21 is offline
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Default I like it

I purchased the product in part because of this thread.

I'm a strummer with aspirations to flatpick/play leads much better than I do now. Have never studied or played bluegrass before but enjoy listening to it.

The book works for me. The 20 different variations on the G run are great. When I listen to bluegrass on the radio now I find myself listening the rhythm work by the guitarist (when it isn't drowned out). Some of the old time bluegrass stuff is really great for this.

I find the bass runs creeping into rock/folk songs that I have been playing for a long time and it sure does make them more interesting. Can't wait to get to the lead stuff.

The author wants you to play with a metronome all the time. That can be a chore but it does illustrate how much work you need to do on timing. I thought mine was pretty good, but not so much when I get to the harder stuff.
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  #21  
Old 12-01-2016, 03:29 PM
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I'm currently working through Vol 1. I've promised myself a NGD if I make it through Vol 8. Looking forward to a Gallagher/Collings/Martin reward.
Wow! I purchased the two pack (Vol 1, 2) and cannot imagine where I'll be as a player if I consciously get through them. To get through volume 8? That's almost beyond my comprehension.
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  #22  
Old 12-01-2016, 03:32 PM
WonderMonkey WonderMonkey is offline
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I purchased the product in part because of this thread.

The author wants you to play with a metronome all the time. That can be a chore but it does illustrate how much work you need to do on timing. I thought mine was pretty good, but not so much when I get to the harder stuff.
I like how the author admitted his faults in not using a metronome, but now tries to always do so. I should also do more.

It should be easy for us as phone apps exist, etc.

The only time I don't WANT to use one is if I'm figuring out something physical, like how the fingers should get from one thing to another. When actually doing anything other than that I attempt to always play with a metronome.
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  #23  
Old 12-01-2016, 07:00 PM
innocent75 innocent75 is offline
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I also work on playing something mistake free many times. Then I put the metronome to it. You have to have something under finger before you can change time in my experience.

I had tried to learn something slowly with the metronome and always wanted to throw the metronome across the room.
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  #24  
Old 12-03-2016, 11:31 AM
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Originally Posted by innocent75 View Post
I also work on playing something mistake free many times. Then I put the metronome to it. You have to have something under finger before you can change time in my experience.

I had tried to learn something slowly with the metronome and always wanted to throw the metronome across the room.
I would agree with that. No need to confuse the issue with a metronome unless you can at least minimally get through the piece.

For an alternative view, if you see the metronome as a guide initially instead of a taskmaster, it can be clicking away in the background while working through a piece a few times. I don't do that, however. I do fumble through the concept a few times then apply the metronome.
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  #25  
Old 12-03-2016, 11:36 AM
WonderMonkey WonderMonkey is offline
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Example 9 is the first "real" walkup point. I went through it the other day but just to do it and get back to my Christmas music. This morning I ran through the Christmas music set twice then came back to flatpicking. Though it didn't sound like a seasoned pro I did get all the way through it in some fashion of competency and it felt GREAT.

One thing I'm wondering though how to know how to do the walkups (and walkdowns) when looking at a new piece of music. Have people just done it enough that they know how to go from one chord to another or do they know the theory behind them and apply that as they go?

I am interested in learning the "why" for theory but I tend to bog myself down on that. If people learn it a bit then just play and through repetition know the common changes then that's what I'll make myself do as well.
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  #26  
Old 12-03-2016, 12:44 PM
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Another use of the metronome is a tool to slow you down. This can be beneficial when you are first learning new material and helps you avoid to tendency to speed up before you are ready.

I'm paraphrasing here, but Dan presents this concept in some of his other writings and suggests starting out at 60 bpm. This can (and does) seem painfully slow, and will tax your to ability to stay focused on the material you are working on. But it does allow the time to make sure that all the physical aspects (including relaxation) of playing the piece are where they should be before working it up to speed.

ymmv

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Old 12-03-2016, 01:01 PM
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Originally Posted by dhodgeh View Post
Another use of the metronome is a tool to slow you down. This can be beneficial when you are first learning new material and helps you avoid to tendency to speed up before you are ready.

I'm paraphrasing here, but Dan presents this concept in some of his other writings and suggests starting out at 60 bpm. This can (and does) seem painfully slow, and will tax your to ability to stay focused on the material you are working on. But it does allow the time to make sure that all the physical aspects (including relaxation) of playing the piece are where they should be before working it up to speed.

ymmv

D
Yes that makes sense. Unintended bad habits by going too fast, then reinforcing them from that point.
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  #28  
Old 12-03-2016, 09:18 PM
reeve21 reeve21 is offline
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I agree about getting the lick under your fingers a few times before using metronome. No sense practicing mistakes on purpose.
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  #29  
Old 12-05-2016, 08:43 AM
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I use Guitar Pro and it's easy to put in simple exercises like what I'm going through now. I've put the first walk-up exercise in there and put it on a low BPM and am going through it. It gives the beat like a metronome but it also shows what is being played. This by no means replaces the metronome but it's good in the beginning. I think doing it long term would create a crutch because it feels like someone is holding your hand and that needs to go away.

I've only spent very little time on this but it's coming. I can see combining a bunch of the exercises as SprintBob suggested and making it an exercise to play a few times a week for the rest of my guitar playing life.
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  #30  
Old 12-05-2016, 09:08 AM
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Or you could quit your job and just a be a professional guitarist, casting a long shadow of accomplishment on all who came before your presence.
I can't quit my job. I retired two years ago.
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