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  #16  
Old 10-10-2016, 07:41 AM
gmr gmr is offline
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Thanks to everyone for the valuable and very interesting input. Thank you, and. Hampton for your insight and your recommendations. Single strings on the bottom two strings makes good sense to me and I really like the non-invasive process of the conversion. I am just a couch player so the stories of your music background were a joy to read as well.
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  #17  
Old 10-20-2016, 03:04 PM
cu4life7 cu4life7 is offline
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You might check this out. Almost pulled the trigger on one of these last week. Definitely on my short list.

http://www.krstrings.com/x-pono-ukelele
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  #18  
Old 11-20-2016, 09:01 PM
M Hayden M Hayden is online now
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+1 on the Frank Ford article.
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  #19  
Old 02-13-2017, 08:12 AM
fatt-dad fatt-dad is offline
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Eastman just released an MDO-305, which is a 20-in scale, carved top octave mandolin. It's an a-model with f-holes, so a bit different from the guitar-shaped OM.

I got mine on advance order through Elderly. They will arrive in May and price out at $699 with hard case.

Can't wait!

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  #20  
Old 02-13-2017, 11:32 AM
merlin666 merlin666 is offline
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If you want to jump right into the Mandocello and get one that's a bit different but could be great value for the money maybe try this rare Ovation Mandocello which may still be available for $1500:

http://www.ovationfanclub.com/megabb...osts=8&start=1

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  #21  
Old 02-13-2017, 11:46 AM
Steve DeRosa Steve DeRosa is offline
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Eastman also just released a mandocello version of their new AR400 L-4 style archtop - seen a photo of a blacktop version but yet to see one for sale in the US (may not be available here)...
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  #22  
Old 02-16-2017, 07:55 AM
ericmeyer4 ericmeyer4 is offline
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Eastman, Gold Tone, and Moran Monroe are making (mostly) affordable Mandocellos. OMs are much easier to come by and there are a plethora of choices in most price ranges.

If you want a mandocello you may also be interested in checking out the banjo cello from gold tone. Same tuning, but with single strings instead of pairs. It helps tame the clutter on the low strings that can happen with a mandocello.
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  #23  
Old 02-16-2017, 08:14 AM
Steve DeRosa Steve DeRosa is offline
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Then again, you could also get an inexpensive baritone guitar (Alvarez has one under $500) and not have to worry about either string clash or learning new fingerings - sounds like a better deal to me if you're just an average guitar player as you say...
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  #24  
Old 02-16-2017, 08:18 AM
ericmeyer4 ericmeyer4 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve DeRosa View Post
Then again, you could also get an inexpensive baritone guitar (Alvarez has one under $500) and not have to worry about either string clash or learning new fingerings - sounds like a better deal to me if you're just an average guitar player as you say...
+1 to this if you are looking for the lower sound without the learning curve.
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  #25  
Old 03-18-2017, 01:01 PM
TwinandTwang TwinandTwang is offline
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I have seen Baby Taylors converted to octave mandos.
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  #26  
Old Yesterday, 12:45 AM
gweetarpicker gweetarpicker is offline
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Default Guitar to Mandocello

I actually have had several guitars converted to mandocellos, a Gibson L7C, a Gibson Harp Guitar, a Gibson Studio Les Paul and a Martin D28. The LP and D28 are now both four string mandocellos which makes them very playable. Typically you can keep the same neck since the scale length is similar to a mandocello. You might have to narrow the neck if you go with four strings instead of eight. String gauges vary, the L7C uses Thomastik mandocello strings, the Gibson harp uses regular D'Addario mandocello strings. The Martin and LP are custom sets .061, .045, .032, .019W on the D28 and .065, .042, .030, .018 plain steel on the LP.
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