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Old 02-10-2016, 02:13 PM
CaineIsCarter CaineIsCarter is offline
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Default ES335 Studio, or wait for Standard?

I'm considering springing for a 335 as my sole electric, and am moving on a LP Studio and a USA Strat to put towards it.

The 335 Studio is less than half the price of the full fat standard. Has anyone any experience with the Studio?

The price is very appealing but I'm worried I'll always be jonesing for the Standard..
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Old 02-10-2016, 04:33 PM
Steve DeRosa Steve DeRosa is offline
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Let me preface my comments by saying that, as the owner of an '07 SG Faded Bass and '11 LP Studio '60s Reissue (goldtop/P-90), Gibson can make some amazing lower-priced instruments when they so desire; that said, there's also been a prevailing "we do because we can" attitude for the last three decades or so when it comes to price structure, particularly on their trademark models. To me, the 335 Studio is proof positive that there's no need to pay twice as much for what amounts to ~$300 in cosmetic upgrades and a couple extra pots; if you're OK with its "everything you need and nothing you don't" aesthetic (BTW I also love the model-specific gingerburst finish) I'd sooner take the $1600 difference and invest it in a nice tube amp - perfect complement to a dual-humbucker semi...
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Old 02-10-2016, 07:15 PM
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I agree w/ S. DeRosa.
Got a LP Studio 2015 model, I love playing it, and it sounds comparable with much more expensive older LP's I use. And it's easier to play, wider neck.
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Old 02-10-2016, 07:43 PM
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Bob Womack Bob Womack is offline
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Hmmm... Your choice. I can tell you a couple of things that play into this choice for me:

1. On my ES-335, the bridge pickup tone control spends most of its life halfway down in order to bring down the overtones to the point where the neck and bridge pickups match well. Of course the same it true of my Les Pauls as well. If you eliminate that second tone control you eliminate that ability.
2. If you like the middle pickup selector position you probably like the ability to blend between the two pickups with the volume controls. Down to only one volume and one tone you miss that ability.

A used ES-335 Faded is a better option if you don't want to loose these important abilities.
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Old 02-10-2016, 10:10 PM
The Growler The Growler is offline
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When I first started reading this I was with Steve. I too have a great LP Studio that is a really nice guitar and I actually like it better without the binding in that color (Manhattan Midnight Blue). Highly recommended.

But, I looked at Bob's comment and went "What?". I just checked. He's right, of course, the studio 335s do not have individual tone and volume for each pickup. When the Studio 335s came out, I never noticed that. I just thought they skipped the binding, etc and were a pretty good deal (like my LP).

So.... I'm with Bob on this one. Hang in there for the real deal. Look for a good used one if you want to get it now and not wait.
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Old 02-11-2016, 06:06 AM
CaineIsCarter CaineIsCarter is offline
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Some great food for thought there chaps, thanks a lot. I've found a dealer who has new stock of the Standard with 300 off, which certainly helps the case for waiting and saving a bit longer.

By the way, I also have a LP Studio, and although I'm selling it, I still find it a fantastic guitar. But it has the full set of controls, and I don't think I would feel the same way about it if it only had two.
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Old 02-11-2016, 07:51 AM
MikeBmusic MikeBmusic is offline
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If you're going to be using the guitar for live playing and switching between rhythm and lead, having those 2 extra pots there when you switch pickups is what you'll want. If you're recording (hence the name 'studio'), it's no big deal.
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Old 02-11-2016, 08:04 AM
Steve Christens Steve Christens is offline
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I might be confused here, but it looks as if the 2016 model year of the ES-335 studio does come with full controls.

http://www.gibson.com/Products/Elect...lectric-Guitar

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Old 02-11-2016, 08:37 AM
Dru Edwards Dru Edwards is offline
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Studios are great guitars. I can't comment specifically on the ES335 studio but I wouldn't think twice about buying a Studio (among my Les Pauls is a Studio).

If you really want a Standard but can't wait, buy a used Studio and then sell it when you want the Standard.
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Old 02-11-2016, 11:14 AM
CaineIsCarter CaineIsCarter is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Christens View Post
I might be confused here, but it looks as if the 2016 model year of the ES-335 studio does come with full controls.

http://www.gibson.com/Products/Elect...lectric-Guitar

That's rather lovely

However, it's almost as expensive as the Standard; only 300 difference.
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Old 02-11-2016, 02:01 PM
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Speaking as an owner of a 1974 ES-345, my first thoughts were to tell you to wait for the one YOU really want... after trying to cut corners for decades, I've morphed into my new gear buying philosophy...

BUY ONCE!

If what you're looking for is value for your money, I would seriously (seriously!) suggest you check out the Reverend semi-hollowbodies... either the "Tricky Gomez" or the "Manta Ray". EVERY Reverend electric I have seen has been beautifully constructed and finished... and all the "variations" from the normal Gibson/Fender clones are very useful and well-though out...

About the only thing I can find fault with the Reverend guitars is that they don't come with a case... but for the $$$, you could buy 2 Caltons on top of the purchase price and STILL be well under the price of new 335!

This may be howling with the wind, if you are a slave to the name on the headstock... but, were I to be looking at an electric guitar purchase these days, that's the FIRST place I'd go, to check out the Reverend line-up thoroughly...

And I LOVE my Gibson electrics, by the way...
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Old 02-11-2016, 02:28 PM
CaineIsCarter CaineIsCarter is offline
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I had a look at the Reverend website and their guitars look very well made, but I am an unashamed slave to the name on the headstock

I agree wholeheartedly with your sentiment of buying once. It's taken me a long time to learn that, but most of all, my previous corner cutting has had more to do with being skint and impatient.

I'm going to buy the one I really want, which is the Standard, in Cherry. I'm excited.
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  #13  
Old 02-11-2016, 05:24 PM
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Bob Womack Bob Womack is offline
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Okay, I'll point you over to my review of the ES-335 DOT, HERE. Mine is a 2005 that my lovely wife surprised me with one Christmas. It has become my go-to guitar for sessions.



I'm glad to have gone through the business of searching for the right one (amongst DOTs and Historics) and finding it. And of course, having it given to you as a gift is really special.

Bob
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Old 02-11-2016, 08:48 PM
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If you find a Studio you like it would actually be quite easy to drill a couple of holes for 4-pot wiring. The F-hole surgery bit isn't that hard either if you know the routine.
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Old 02-11-2016, 09:26 PM
The Growler The Growler is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeBmusic View Post
If you're going to be using the guitar for live playing and switching between rhythm and lead, having those 2 extra pots there when you switch pickups is what you'll want. If you're recording (hence the name 'studio'), it's no big deal.
The original idea for the studio models was to give the buyer all the sound of the standard models, but remove the "fancy stuff" like binding and fancier inlays because the reasoning was it could look plainer as one one would see it in a studio. So... Studio models should have the extra pots.
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