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  #31  
Old 01-04-2017, 08:14 PM
Neonzapper Neonzapper is offline
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This doesn't sound right to me, but I'm no expert.
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  #32  
Old 01-07-2017, 10:45 PM
gfsark gfsark is offline
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As a cabinet maker/finisher I would say that much depends on the oil your guitar got soaked in. Some oils just won't dry out, especially if applied wrongly. And that would leave a constant seeping residue as mentioned above. Could be fixed by sealing with shellac or vinyl sealer and then lacquering.

Back in the 70's Danish oils were all the rage because they produced a flat to satin finish, showed the wood well which fitted the hippy esthetic of naturalness, and were really easy for amateurs to apply without leaving any streaks. Just rag on and rag off. What could go wrong? If oils are so easy to apply, why aren't they used on instruments? Too soft, time consuming to wipe off, and slow to dry. Generally considered difficult to impossible to fix problems, also. With lacquer, you can sand, recoat, buff out and hide/fix almost any defect.
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