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  #16  
Old 09-16-2017, 06:34 AM
KevWind KevWind is offline
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Personally I do not buy into the myth that a mic can be "to good" for a beginner .
Any more than I buy into the concept that a guitar can be to good

They are just tools, the notion that someone should start with less than the best tool they can afford is specious .

That: said the other side of coin is the notion of work with what you have, just start working , has merit. Especially since you already have the mic's. You are not going to lose out on anything by using them as your learning tools.
I think the 420 and the 170 are fine to get started with. As you said there is lot to learn and those mic are not going to inhibit that in any way.
That does not mean at some point you can't investigate getting something different. But the point is , it's a long journey and it starts with taking a single step at a time .
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  #17  
Old 09-16-2017, 09:03 AM
RRuskin RRuskin is offline
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Originally Posted by rick-slo View Post
For recording an acoustic guitar I don't use the low cut filters built into my microphones. That would be a non reversible outcome. I play around with low cut as my ears dictate post recording using the software in the DAW.
My philosophy is that if I don't like the sound I'm getting while recording, I won't like it any better on playback. Therefore, I'll fine tune with mic choice, placement, and eq on the way in so as to have fewer problems on the way out. I draw the line at compression which I only do as needed on remix.
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  #18  
Old 09-16-2017, 09:16 AM
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rick-slo rick-slo is offline
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Originally Posted by RRuskin View Post
My philosophy is that if I don't like the sound I'm getting while recording, I won't like it any better on playback. Therefore, I'll fine tune with mic choice, placement, and eq on the way in so as to have fewer problems on the way out. I draw the line at compression which I only do as needed on remix.
I agree if you are sure of your decisions up front. I'm not. For example post recording I will play around with reverb. To my ears different reverbs
sound better with more or less low end. Also I generally low cut at a lower frequency than my mikes begin their low cut at.
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Last edited by rick-slo; 09-16-2017 at 09:30 AM.
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  #19  
Old 09-16-2017, 09:27 AM
Brent Hahn Brent Hahn is offline
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Originally Posted by vindibona1 View Post
... the bass cut does clean things up quite a bit. As a newbie I was surprised and in a way it invalidates my previous recordings.
It's working for you with that mic and that guitar in that room, which is great. But I'd hesitate to call it a recommended practice for everyone else.
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  #20  
Old 09-16-2017, 09:42 AM
vindibona1 vindibona1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KevWind View Post
Personally I do not buy into the myth that a mic can be "to good" for a beginner .
Any more than I buy into the concept that a guitar can be to good

They are just tools, the notion that someone should start with less than the best tool they can afford is specious .

That: said the other side of coin is the notion of work with what you have, just start working , has merit. Especially since you already have the mic's. You are not going to lose out on anything by using them as your learning tools.
I think the 420 and the 170 are fine to get started with. As you said there is lot to learn and those mic are not going to inhibit that in any way.
That does not mean at some point you can't investigate getting something different. But the point is , it's a long journey and it starts with taking a single step at a time .
Thanks. I did the best I could with the mic selection without knowing anything. It's like acoustic guitars; learning what to listen for. I'm pretty good at evaluating guitar sounds now (not guitar recordings) but until recently I could only tell you what I liked, not knowing that an OM had a purposefully different sound than a dread, etc. Same thing with mics.

A couple more questions if you'll indulge me...
Should I be thinking about getting a second mic of either the P170 or P420 to approximate "matched pairs"? Also would I benefit from upgrading my interface? I'm currently running with a M-Audio M-Track, shown below.
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  #21  
Old 09-16-2017, 09:51 AM
RRuskin RRuskin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rick-slo View Post
I agree if you are sure of your decisions up front. I'm not. For example post recording I will play around with reverb. To my ears different reverbs
sound better with more or less low end. Also I generally low cut at a lower frequency than my mikes begin their low cut at.
I should have mentioned that I don't print with reverb or any "non-reversible" effects. While not reversible per se, eq can at least be compensated for if one's mind changes.
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  #22  
Old 09-16-2017, 10:40 AM
Fran Guidry Fran Guidry is offline
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Originally Posted by vindibona1 View Post
Thanks Fran,

I can see I have a ton to learn. Some of this stuff makes my eyes glaze over.

Do you think I'm ok to start with my AKG P420 and P170 mics, or do I need to be thinking of something different better? Would I have been better off had I initially gone with something like a Rode NT2a?
The most important thing you can do to improve your recordings is play and record a lot. One of the least important things you can do is buy more or different microphones.

Obviously some people disagree strongly with my opinion, but I've done numerous same source level matched mic comparisons that demonstrate the minute audible difference between decent mics.







http://www.homebrewedmusic.com/2009/...on-a-tutorial/

http://www.homebrewedmusic.com/2009/...ur-more-clips/

Fran
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  #23  
Old 09-16-2017, 10:59 AM
Brent Hahn Brent Hahn is offline
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Originally Posted by Fran Guidry View Post
One of the least important things you can do is buy more or different microphones...
Those 3 demos are a compelling argument. You make those mics sound very, very similar.
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  #24  
Old 09-16-2017, 12:11 PM
vindibona1 vindibona1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fran Guidry View Post
The most important thing you can do to improve your recordings is play and record a lot. One of the least important things you can do is buy more or different microphones.

Obviously some people disagree strongly with my opinion, but I've done numerous same source level matched mic comparisons that demonstrate the minute audible difference between decent mics.

Fran
How can one disagree after listening to those clips. I really like the sound of the NT2a. When I started I just wanted something decent in the budget range and that Rode was way beyond what I was looking to spend.

Just this thread has shown me a lot. I'll have to digest it piece by piece to keep my eyes from glazing over. I hate learning new software. The software I'm really good at I've been at for 20 years. It all started off with simple things then GRADUALLY added more advanced stuff to add to the trick box. Here I am now, faced with full blown advanced programs. Feels like drinking from a fire hose.
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  #25  
Old 09-17-2017, 01:34 PM
Fran Guidry Fran Guidry is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
Those 3 demos are a compelling argument. You make those mics sound very, very similar.
The only thing I'm doing is being careful to match levels and putting the mics in the same location. I'm always appalled by people who claim to be comparing mics but don't match levels, don't use the same position, and/or don't even use the same performance.

I'd venture to say that if you take two mics with the same pattern and transducer tech, place them close to each other, and use a 1 khz tone to match levels carefully, you'll find the same similarities I did.

I have to admit that I find mics fascinating, and I've bought way too many of them, but my recordings didn't improve based on the price of those mics. My recordings improved because I did a lot of recording (and treated my room and learned to manage tracking levels properly).

Fran
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  #26  
Old 09-18-2017, 08:01 AM
MikeBmusic MikeBmusic is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vindibona1 View Post
Should I be thinking about getting a second mic of either the P170 or P420 to approximate "matched pairs"? Also would I benefit from upgrading my interface? I'm currently running with a M-Audio M-Track, shown below.
I don't think you need to get a same-model mic (it won't be a 'matched pair' anyway) unless you want to do X-Y placement of mics.
If you are satisfied with your interface, no reason to upgrade at this point. You'll have to spend quite a bit more money for any noticeable upgrade to preamps or A-D converters.
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