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  #31  
Old 03-31-2017, 08:36 PM
redir redir is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by murrmac123 View Post
This was drilled into me as well, by old craftsmen who failed to appreciate the upstart logic of a youngster who pointed out that the chance of accidental damage to the edge of the blade (or "iron " as it was called back then) was far greater if the plane was laid on its side than if it was set upright. Accidental damage to a knuckle as well.

That of course only applies in a bench environment ... working out on site obviously you lay it on its side.

Since it is extremely unlikely that there will be any stray hardware(screws , nails, etc) lying around on a luthier's bench, setting the plane down upright is the preferred option.
For about 20 years I ALWAYS laid my planes down on their side till one day a guy who was far better then I will ever achieve in a life time taught me the same thing... I now ALWAYS lay them upright

You can teach an old dog new tricks. Of course as with most things, either approach is just as well
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  #32  
Old 04-01-2017, 06:44 AM
MC5C MC5C is offline
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And here I thought I was a heretic for keeping my planes upright. Although as soon as I have finished using them I retract the iron. My favorite planes are my 1850's Sorby high angle toothed blade veneer plane. It thicknesses quickly on hardwood and is essentially immune to tearout. You can plane in any direction on any wood. Bit of a miracle to use the first time. My Sargent 306 block plane has an adjustable mouth and is what I use for almost all smoothing. If I hand-joint thin wood (which I do very rarely) I will usually put a finely set up Stanley No. 7 upside down in a vise and push the wood over it rather than moving the plane.
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  #33  
Old 04-01-2017, 09:20 AM
Bill Kraus Bill Kraus is offline
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I love my Lie-Nielsen planes, I see them as a great investment. High quality and U.S. made.
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  #34  
Old 04-01-2017, 02:24 PM
Frank Ford Frank Ford is offline
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AND, before you choose a plane, consider having one precisely custom made for you:

ORDERING A CUSTOM PLANE
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  #35  
Old 04-01-2017, 03:47 PM
redir redir is offline
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Har har har. I really need to just stay off the internet today.
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  #36  
Old 04-11-2017, 11:58 AM
Truckjohn Truckjohn is online now
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Glad to hear you made your decision. Lee Valley makes some very high quality tools.

I dont think you will regret the decision. There will always be the opportunity to chase old rust should you feel the need.
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  #37  
Old 04-11-2017, 07:05 PM
SnowManSnow SnowManSnow is offline
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Happy with the choice so far.
I'm not very good at it ha... yet
Rinse and repeat
Anyway... I was able to joint a back w it earlier today.
Actually it's fun



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  #38  
Old 04-11-2017, 09:36 PM
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Halcyon/Tinker Halcyon/Tinker is offline
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Them are some pretty thick shavings for jointing...
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  #39  
Old 04-11-2017, 10:02 PM
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Bruce Sexauer Bruce Sexauer is offline
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Quote:
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Them are some pretty thick shavings for jointing...
Plus one!!
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  #40  
Old 04-12-2017, 07:24 PM
SnowManSnow SnowManSnow is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce Sexauer View Post
Plus one!!


Agreed!!! After some adjustment and trial and error they were MUCH thinner and the back jointed a lot easier in the learning process here.
Lesson here is that a little adjustment goes a LONG way!


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  #41  
Old 04-18-2017, 07:49 AM
Brendonlee7 Brendonlee7 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowManSnow View Post
Agreed!!! After some adjustment and trial and error they were MUCH thinner and the back jointed a lot easier in the learning process here.
Lesson here is that a little adjustment goes a LONG way!


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Quick Question. I'm in the same boat as you SnowManSnow. Purchasing my first plane and taking a look at the Veritas. I noticed you have three options;

Includes a lapped 25 blade, 2-1/4" wide by 3/16" (0.187") thick, in your choice of A2, O1 or PM-V11 tool steel. Lapped 38 and 50 blades are available, as well as a toothed A2 blade for working difficult grain.


Did you go with the A2, 01, or PM-V11? Or does anyone have suggestion for which Jack Plane?

Thanks,

Brendon
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  #42  
Old 04-18-2017, 09:01 AM
SnowManSnow SnowManSnow is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brendonlee7 View Post

Quick Question. I'm in the same boat as you SnowManSnow. Purchasing my first plane and taking a look at the Veritas. I noticed you have three options;

Includes a lapped 25 blade, 2-1/4" wide by 3/16" (0.187") thick, in your choice of A2, O1 or PM-V11 tool steel. Lapped 38 and 50 blades are available, as well as a toothed A2 blade for working difficult grain.


Did you go with the A2, 01, or PM-V11? Or does anyone have suggestion for which Jack Plane?

Thanks,

Brendon
I personally went with the PM-V11 iron. I don't have a lot of experience with the others, but reviews were tight, and I didn't want to regret not spending a LITTLE extra to have a great iron with a great plane. The toothed blade is available, but it is for really taking things down. It would be nice to have on hand.. but to something I immediately needed.

I can say as a total plane noob that it using a hand plane is a real skill that will take a lot of rehearsal to get right, but well worth it. There really is something special about hearing that "swoosh" sound from a well made pass that is VERY satisfying.

I'm keeping my eye out for a great block plane next
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  #43  
Old 04-27-2017, 03:49 AM
doctorrockit doctorrockit is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MC5C View Post
If I hand-joint thin wood (which I do very rarely) I will usually put a finely set up Stanley No. 7 upside down in a vise and push the wood over it rather than moving the plane.
I remember seeing William Cumpiano's planer which consisted of a well made chassis that held a bench plane upside down, under its bed. The plane was mounted askew (maybe 30 degrees) and produced superior jointed plates by passing book matched sets over the cutter a few times. I'd like to build one for myself.
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