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  #1  
Old 09-09-2017, 02:31 AM
Troyboi Troyboi is offline
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Default Do I need a better electric guitar whilst learning?

Ok well I have my Greg Bennet D7 acoustic which Im happy with and I also brought a cheap Fender Squire bullet for $100 AUD with a cheap Samick amp. Ive since brought a line 6 Spider 3 amp which is better than what I had.

The Squire was in ok condition but I replaced the saddles and the pick guard. But the pick guard I brought was a cheapy from eBay and the pick up slots are too big. The pick ups now sit on an angle either tilted forwards or backwards.

So my question is this. Do I bother to upgrade my guitar to a better one? Ive been bidding on a Squire California series (But missed out) and now a Squire classic vibe 60 series. I can't afford to spend $1000s on a proper Fender Strat or Tele so have only been looking at the cheaper squires. But Ive only been playing since June this year so am I better off just sticking with what Ive got and maybe upgrading in a year or 2 once Im better at it?

Or my other option is to maybe buy new pick ups etc for the bullet to make it sound better. Do it up a bit and stick with it.
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  #2  
Old 09-09-2017, 03:38 AM
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My advice is to upgrade as soon as possible, and as much as is practical and responsible based on your budget. I think you will find that a decent, easy to play electric guitar will be a remarkable value. Such a guitar can properly meet one's needs for a lifetime.

Made in Mexico Strats and Teles are exceptional values.
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Old 09-09-2017, 03:48 AM
C_Becker C_Becker is offline
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Don't put any money into the Bullet, I don't think its worth it.
The Squier Classic Vibes are good instruments that can last you for years.
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Old 09-09-2017, 05:45 AM
paulp1960 paulp1960 is offline
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I recently bought a second hand Squier Classic Vibe 50s Telecaster from ebay.

I've just got it back from a setup and it is a really nice guitar.
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Old 09-09-2017, 07:47 AM
roylor4 roylor4 is offline
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If I were you, I would consider a G&L Tribute series. Incredible bang for the buck and well made. I bought all three of mine for under $800. The Bluesboy is very versatile. Get one of those and a Boss Katana and you're set for life. The classic Vibe stuff is pretty nice too.

I'm guessing you don't have Musicians Friend in Australia? The run them on sale for $299 fairly frequently.

Don't waste money on the Bullet.
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Old 09-09-2017, 08:09 AM
FrankHudson FrankHudson is offline
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In my mind, there are three things here.

1. Playability and mechanical issues. If you can, with whatever guitar you learn on, get a good setup done. This could cost as much as a cheap instrument, but it's more valuable than the instrument itself in allowing you to learn. If you can't get this done (rural area/no funds available for example) consider learning how to do a basic setup yourself. I learned from Dan Erlewine's books myself, but there are probably online resources to be found too.

2. Timbre/"tone" Different electric guitars sound different, and different guitar amps sound even more different. However, unless you're focused already on a particular sound, there's no reason to obsess at first about getting the right amp, even though it can be very important later on. An inexpensive modeling amp (which you seem now have) it a good way to start exploring amps and effects, as even the most meagre of them will let you experience various timbres and help you find your place among them.

3. Worry that you don't have a good enough guitar. While a good guitar can motivate learning, that's not the same as saying that shopping for a better guitar replaces learning. I can't judge your budget or the compromises it would take to get a more expensive guitar. I can't see your guitar and hold and play it. Here's one way to approach your wish to get a better guitar: set yourself a goal in regards your electric guitar playing. I can't tell you what that goal is, you need to look to yourself to find that. Promise yourself when you achieve that goal, then (and only then) you will look for a different or better guitar. And don't forget the possibility that even the better guitar will benefit from a setup.

We're in a wonderful world as far as cheap electric guitars go. In US dollars $200 to $500 can buy a lot of good instruments.
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Old 09-09-2017, 11:32 AM
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by the time you purchase two or three guitars that you may not like, or wish to upgrade, you could buy the one you want. i see this happening on a continual basis.

play music!
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  #8  
Old 09-09-2017, 11:53 AM
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There are lots of good guitars for less than a thousand.

http://www.godinguitars.com/godinproductlistingp.html

https://www.reverendguitars.com

https://reverb.com/marketplace/electric-guitars

etcetera etc

Good luck in your search!
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  #9  
Old 09-09-2017, 12:49 PM
Paleolith54 Paleolith54 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Troyboi View Post
Ok well I have my Greg Bennet D7 acoustic which Im happy with and I also brought a cheap Fender Squire bullet for $100 AUD with a cheap Samick amp. Ive since brought a line 6 Spider 3 amp which is better than what I had.

The Squire was in ok condition but I replaced the saddles and the pick guard. But the pick guard I brought was a cheapy from eBay and the pick up slots are too big. The pick ups now sit on an angle either tilted forwards or backwards.

So my question is this. Do I bother to upgrade my guitar to a better one? Ive been bidding on a Squire California series (But missed out) and now a Squire classic vibe 60 series. I can't afford to spend $1000s on a proper Fender Strat or Tele so have only been looking at the cheaper squires. But Ive only been playing since June this year so am I better off just sticking with what Ive got and maybe upgrading in a year or 2 once Im better at it?

Or my other option is to maybe buy new pick ups etc for the bullet to make it sound better. Do it up a bit and stick with it.
IMO:

1. The Bullet is plenty good enough to learn on. Keep researching alternatives. When you reach the point at which the guitar is holding you back, you'll know.

2. Definitely do not put any more money into the Bullet (including paying someone to do a setup on it). Use this as an opportunity to learn to do basic setups yourself. It's easy, and the consequences of screwing up a Bullet are pretty minimal.

3. I assume you're playing through the Line 6 amp, right? Pretty much any guitar you feed into that will sound the same coming out, so I'd say if the guitar feels OK in your hands, don't sweat stuff like angled pickups, just use it for learning and move on when the time is right.

HOWEVER: one guy above mentioned the notion of just buying what you really want NOW instead of gradually buying-and-selling (and losing) your way there over a long period. I'd certainly agree with that if you know you will keep playing and if you are sure you know what you want. Otherwise, I'd stick with the Bullet, work on it a bit yourself, and not pull the trigger until you're pretty sure of what you want.
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Old 09-09-2017, 03:00 PM
paulp1960 paulp1960 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muscmp View Post
by the time you purchase two or three guitars that you may not like, or wish to upgrade, you could buy the one you want. i see this happening on a continual basis.

play music!
That's one way of looking at things but learning guitar is like a journey and you don't know where you will end up. For example knowing little about acoustic guitars a few years ago I bought a dreadnought thinking it was a normal sized acoustic. Turns out I really don't like dreads from a sound or comfort angle.

So had I bought a Martin D18 from the start I would have made a big mistake.
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Old 09-09-2017, 03:09 PM
harpspitfire harpspitfire is offline
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well, your in AU, so i dont know whats available there, as far as squiers go, the low end models have alot to be desired, i would say a good cheap upgrade would be a squier 51, very nice unique guitar, i got mine for $130, other then that, you can find some used real strats ( though MIM) for between 250-300 USD over here, im not sure id buy a used ebay guitar without seeing it 1st- to many concerns, a lot of strats may have excessive fret wear also, those line 6 amps strike me as a metal amp, i dont what you play- but you may consider a different used amp in the future also- i got a vox AD30VT at a pawn shop for $80, its my favorite right now
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Old 09-09-2017, 05:39 PM
Steel and wood Steel and wood is offline
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Perhaps a second hand Mexican made Fender Stratocaster.
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Old 09-10-2017, 02:40 PM
Mr Bojangles Mr Bojangles is offline
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I own several expensive Fenders, but I also have a couple of Bullets and Epiphones. I don't think that there is anything wrong with the cheaper guitars, in fact, I play them more often than the "good" ones. It all comes down to what you like, and if it sounds and feels good to you, that's all you have to worry about. On the other hand, a crummy amp can ruin the sound of any guitar. I would suggest putting your cash into a quality tube amp.
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Old 09-10-2017, 04:36 PM
1neeto 1neeto is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Bojangles View Post
I own several expensive Fenders, but I also have a couple of Bullets and Epiphones. I don't think that there is anything wrong with the cheaper guitars, in fact, I play them more often than the "good" ones. It all comes down to what you like, and if it sounds and feels good to you, that's all you have to worry about. On the other hand, a crummy amp can ruin the sound of any guitar. I would suggest putting your cash into a quality tube amp.


Modeling amps of today are leaps and bounds from the modeling amps from 15-20 years ago. Not everyone can get a "quality" tube amp and much less have the place to crank it up to get the right tone out of it.

His Spider III amp is not bad, a bit outdated and not as good as the newer versions, but still nothing terrible. And at 15 watts solid state power, it's just about perfect for practicing.

OP: the bullet is absolutely fine to learn on. Yes they don't have the greatest hardware or electronics, but they do play well, and playability is what's important when you're learning. I have a heavily modified Squier II from the late 80's, this guitar is so crappy, that the body is actually made out of plywood. But it has a fantastic neck, That's why she was my main gigging guitar.
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  #15  
Old 09-10-2017, 04:51 PM
Truckjohn Truckjohn is offline
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Since this is an electric - how do you like the neck feel in your hands?

Assuming you like the neck.... Almost everything else can be changed easily enough.

Since you are learning - I would spend all my money on setup. I want a fast and easy playing neck... That means awesome setup and bang-on fretwork.... $300 worth of setup money for fret level/crown, nut and saddle adjustment, and intonation adjustment - and you are well on your way with a guitar that's a joy to learn on..

If that vexes you and you just can't bring yourself to spend this sort of money on a cheap guitar (I still say its money well spent..) ..... And you have pushed yourself into a corner and hate the thing... Buy a used guitar at a mom and pop's music store that has already been set up - or negotiate a setup including level and crown the frets, setting the nut, saddle, and intonation for low, fast play..

A really good setup will make you happy...
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