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  #1  
Old 06-08-2011, 05:08 AM
cadam5150 cadam5150 is offline
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Default Which Wood Glue?

Dear Members,

I live in Singapore, and occasionally I will restore acoustic guitars. So far Titebond wood glue has been doing fine. I am considering LMI's Instrument Maker's glue as well. However both are not available immediately in my country.

I found these brands in my local art & craft shop.

1. Gorilla Wood Glue: http://gorillaglue.com/glues/woodglue/index.aspx

2. Elmer's Carpenter's Wood Glue: http://www.amazon.com/Elmers-E701-Ca...7531746&sr=8-8

3. ECOGLUE Premium Wood Glue: http://www.thegreenproductscompany.c...e/egwood.htm#A

The many experienced luthiers in this forum, what is your take?
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Old 06-08-2011, 05:15 AM
dekutree64 dekutree64 is offline
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Hide glue is my favorite, but original Titebond is fine as well.
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Old 06-08-2011, 06:22 AM
Kyle76 Kyle76 is offline
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Titebond and Elmer's Carpenter's glue are about the same in my experience, but I'm no luthier.
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Old 06-08-2011, 06:43 AM
Laurent Brondel Laurent Brondel is offline
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Gorilla wood glue works very well, be aware that it has a shorter open time than Titebond 1, and also a shorter cure time. However it has much better tack and dries clear, not yellow, too big plusses in my world. I use it for some applications.
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Old 06-08-2011, 09:35 AM
arie arie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Laurent Brondel View Post
Gorilla wood glue works very well, be aware that it has a shorter open time than Titebond 1, and also a shorter cure time. However it has much better tack and dries clear, not yellow, too big plusses in my world. I use it for some applications.
ohhh... dries clear? i must try this. what apps do you use it for? any idea of the shelf life?
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Old 06-08-2011, 10:09 AM
Misty44 Misty44 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dekutree64 View Post
Hide glue is my favorite, but original Titebond is fine as well.
Regarding hide glue, there is the off-the-shelf, ready-out-of-the-bottle hide glue



and the make-it-from-scratch hide glue, referred to as "hot" hide glue, which takes some preparation


photo: Frank Ford

Although not convenient, hot hide glue is used by many builders and techs for critical structural applications, but I've yet to hear any positive endorsements or uses for the liquid version.



Titebond on the other hand is used frequently.

Does anyone like using the liquid hide glue?
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Old 06-08-2011, 02:08 PM
henderson is go henderson is go is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Misty44 View Post
Regarding hide glue, there is the off-the-shelf, ready-out-of-the-bottle hide glue



and the make-it-from-scratch hide glue, referred to as "hot" hide glue, which takes some preparation


photo: Frank Ford

Although not convenient, hot hide glue is used by many builders and techs for critical structural applications, but I've yet to hear any positive endorsements or uses for the liquid version.



Titebond on the other hand is used frequently.

Does anyone like using the liquid hide glue?

After trying the liquid hide glue and having my bracing come loose, the only thing I would use it for is gluing in labels.
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  #8  
Old 06-08-2011, 02:20 PM
JohnM JohnM is offline
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the liquid hide glue from Franklin is not well thought of in the lutherie world. IF if you get a really fresh batch it's not horrible glue, but it's not nearly up to par with the other PVA's (Titebond orginal, LMI white, ect) or "real" hot hide glue. Fish glue works well too.
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Old 06-08-2011, 05:22 PM
dekutree64 dekutree64 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Misty44 View Post
Regarding hide glue, there is the off-the-shelf, ready-out-of-the-bottle hide glue

and the make-it-from-scratch hide glue, referred to as "hot" hide glue, which takes some preparation
Ah, thanks for remembering that point. Yes, only hot hide glue.
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  #10  
Old 06-10-2011, 06:46 AM
cadam5150 cadam5150 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Laurent Brondel View Post
Gorilla wood glue works very well, be aware that it has a shorter open time than Titebond 1, and also a shorter cure time. However it has much better tack and dries clear, not yellow, too big plusses in my world. I use it for some applications.
Thanks for your advice. I will try the Gorilla for some applications.
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  #11  
Old 06-12-2011, 03:18 PM
Greg Nelson Greg Nelson is offline
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A repair man's point of view.

Hide or fish glue is not all that hard to learn to use. The main benefit is that the joints can be disassembled and remade with no loss of strength. Bridges neck joints and fret boards benefit most from this as they are the areas that most likely will need repair or adjustment in the future. Steam or heat the joints and they come apart. The residue cleans easily and glue back together as strong as before. HHG actually pulls the joint together as it cures. It also washes out of my work clothes easily if I happen to spill If excess squeezes out it can be cleaned with warm water even a week later. If you don't get it all off it will not show up when stained or finished.

PVA's are the next best solution. They are easier to use initially than HHG but the joint needs to be cleaned down to fresh wood again before re-bonding if it fails. If not the new joint will be in danger of failing. If you stick with Titebond I or it's equal then it will come out in the wash. Use the modified "water proof" stuff and... You need to be careful about cleaning the squeeze out. These glues appear during finish.

The greatest benefit of polyurethane glues (gorilla) is that it is water proof but something many people miss in the instructions is that Poly needs moisture to work. Dried woods such as we use while building guitars should be moistened before applying the glue. If done properly the glue may foam and expand slightly (even though they say it won't foam). This can decouple the joint if just ever so slightly even when clamped properly. Not a problem when laminating a neck for instance because the dimensional lumber can withstand the force, but it can be a problem for thinner materials like your top/back to side joints or applying linings or purflings. It can also stain your hands and is a bi@#* to clean off once it has started to set up. My experience is that it dries a light tan. It also can appear when staining or finishing.

Poly is not as the advertising used to state "the strongest glue in the world" but it is an absolute PITA to deal with when trying to repair a failed joint. If you plan on your instruments lasting my primary recommendation is for HHG and after that PVA of the non waterproof variety.

Lot's of opinion out there about "best" but I would personally stay away from the poly glues.

Greg N
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  #12  
Old 06-13-2011, 05:24 AM
Laurent Brondel Laurent Brondel is offline
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Greg, the OP was asking about Gorilla wood glue, which is a PVA glue I believe, and not Gorilla polyurethane glue, which is an entirely different beast. People often make the confusion.
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Last edited by Laurent Brondel; 06-13-2011 at 10:38 AM.
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  #13  
Old 06-13-2011, 09:34 AM
arie arie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Laurent Brondel View Post
Greg, the OP was asking about Gorilla wood glue, which is a PVA glue I believe, and not Gorilla polyrethane glue, which is an entirely different beast. People often make the confusion.
where do you find that the gorilla wood glue works best for you?
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  #14  
Old 06-13-2011, 10:10 AM
Laurent Brondel Laurent Brondel is offline
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Everywhere you would use Titebond 1, except when you need the longer open time of TB1.
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Old 06-13-2011, 10:22 AM
arie arie is offline
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thanks laurent.
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