The Acoustic Guitar Forum

Go Back   The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > PLAY

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 09-10-2017, 08:16 PM
LNW LNW is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 5
Default Returning to Guitar - determining a path forward so I don't plateau

Hello, everyone. Just joined the forum, and this is my first post. My usual guitars are my Takamine 6 string and Epiphone 12 string.

My question/purpose for this post is asking for any resources, opinions, thoughts, suggestions of what direction and approach I should take to bettering my guitar playing/skills. Let me explain by telling a little personal background.

When I was in high school, I took guitar lessons for a few years. My guitar teacher introduced me to different musical styles of the guitar which I dabbled around with (some more than others). But I eventually stopped lessons because I didn't have a very wide music appreciation (as I do now), so working hard at some new jazz or blue skills didn't interest me too much...but largely I stopped because I "plateaued" - if there was some specific song I wanted to learn, I'd learn it. So this resulted in my usual playing time just being playing the same old songs, some chords and singing, some really basic improv solos, etc.

Now, several years later, I have a more expansive taste of music and know the types of music I really love...classic rock, blues, folk music. And I've been picking up the guitar a bit more lately like with my newly acquired 12 string. But I still find myself dealing with the same issue as years ago - playing the same old same old, not really getting better at anything, nothing clear to work toward. Just aimlessly messing around which eventually makes my interest peter out because I know each play session will kinda just be a repeat of the last one, etc.

I want to advance my skills and get better. I want to spend more time actually practicing on something and adding new skills, not just aimlessly messing around and playing the same old songs. I have an interest in getting better at acoustic blues (for starters)...whether rhythm guitar, improv soloing, some mix of both, new licks, etc. But I have a fuzzy idea of how to get there, what to do. I just don't know where to start. Some ideas I've had are to get a comprehensive book on acoustic blues, or to get one book I found that gives you a new guitar lick to learn each day for a year. Or maybe start taking guitar lessons again.

Thanks for reading my (lengthy) question, and for any suggestions, encouragement and input you may have!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09-10-2017, 09:00 PM
tonyo tonyo is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 607
Default

I'd say part of the answer to your question lies in what you want to do.

We have the good fortune of living close (one hour drive) to a very active acoustic music club. This means the social aspect of playing to others / with others gives me all sorts of inspiration and keeps me from plateauing.

If you can find a social group of like mind, see how that helps you out.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-10-2017, 09:23 PM
Guitar Slim II Guitar Slim II is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 27
Default

You act as if learning the songs you want to learn is trivial. For a player, it's kind of the whole point...

But when you say you "learned a song", did you learn it note-for-note like the guitar player on the record played it? And could you nail it?

If you can already do that -- that is, play just like B.B. or Hendrix or Clapton or Knopfler et al -- well, you're probably already beyond what most teachers can teach you.

But if you can't play it note-for-note, in real time, then you haven't really learned the song, IMO. That should be the goal: play what the cats are playing, right down to their signature licks and favorite chord voicings. And really play it: in time, with the record or with other musicians.

And even if you don't really want to play covers long-term, you master a style by mastering the masters. That's how you make a style part of your own musical DNA.

Styles like blues and rock are usually pretty basic, the harmony is pretty straightforward compared to jazz or classical. What can you do, then, but just try to be a better player? And the best way to do that is to learn from great players...they're the best teachers you'll ever have.

Last edited by Guitar Slim II; 09-10-2017 at 09:44 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-11-2017, 02:55 AM
JonPR JonPR is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 4,034
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LNW View Post
My question/purpose for this post is asking for any resources, opinions, thoughts, suggestions of what direction and approach I should take to bettering my guitar playing/skills.
IMO that's the wrong angle to start with. The prime aim should be to play music you enjoy, perhaps with a goal of performing with or to others. "Bettering guitar skills" are just a means to the end.
The only good reason to want to improve your skills is if there is music you want to play but are currently unable to play it. Just improving skills for the sake of it is likely to lead to boredom, and wondering what it's all for.

(Sorry if you take all this for granted - I'm being pedantic!)
Quote:
Originally Posted by LNW View Post
Let me explain by telling a little personal background.

When I was in high school, I took guitar lessons for a few years. My guitar teacher introduced me to different musical styles of the guitar which I dabbled around with (some more than others). But I eventually stopped lessons because I didn't have a very wide music appreciation (as I do now), so working hard at some new jazz or blue skills didn't interest me too much...but largely I stopped because I "plateaued" - if there was some specific song I wanted to learn, I'd learn it. So this resulted in my usual playing time just being playing the same old songs, some chords and singing, some really basic improv solos, etc.
But that was because - as you say - your tastes were then limited. You ran out of tunes that excited you enough to want to learn them.
Or perhaps you regarded learning the songs as an end in itself. "OK I can play this tune - now what?"
Quote:
Originally Posted by LNW View Post
Now, several years later, I have a more expansive taste of music and know the types of music I really love...classic rock, blues, folk music. And I've been picking up the guitar a bit more lately like with my newly acquired 12 string. But I still find myself dealing with the same issue as years ago - playing the same old same old, not really getting better at anything, nothing clear to work toward.
Aren't you "working toward" playing that music you love?
Or are you finding that for each of those exciting songs you want to learn, by the time you've learned it, it's boring? The music you love is great, until you find you can actually play it, which spoils the magic in some way?
Quote:
Originally Posted by LNW View Post
Just aimlessly messing around which eventually makes my interest peter out because I know each play session will kinda just be a repeat of the last one, etc.
Well, the obvious answer is don't repeat the last one!
Some repetition is inevitable of course. To learn a difficult tune, you need enough patience to hammer away at the hard parts over and over until you master them. You have to really love that song (and/or really love the repetitive act of learning).
But if you find yourself going round in circles - getting bored with a song that ought to be fun - move to a different song. One that requires some different techniques, different chords, whatever.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LNW View Post
I want to advance my skills and get better. I want to spend more time actually practicing on something and adding new skills, not just aimlessly messing around and playing the same old songs. I have an interest in getting better at acoustic blues (for starters)...whether rhythm guitar, improv soloing, some mix of both, new licks, etc. But I have a fuzzy idea of how to get there, what to do. I just don't know where to start. Some ideas I've had are to get a comprehensive book on acoustic blues, or to get one book I found that gives you a new guitar lick to learn each day for a year. Or maybe start taking guitar lessons again.
Seems from this your central aim is still "getting better at playing". But why? What's it all for? It's like you want a whole collection of tools, but have no idea what the job is?
Think about why you value improved guitar skills. Yes, of course it will enable you to play more difficult and interesting music. But why not make that music the focus of your goals? The guitar is a tool, nothing more.

The point of it all is to have an activity you enjoy doing - in the present moment. "Progress" should not be on your mind as you play. You have to find pleasure in every note, chord and sequence as you're playing it. That's the whole point of music, whether we're listeners or performers.
The more you play, the better you will get - inevitably - so the secret is to enjoy the process and the experience. Then it's a win-win: you're having fun, and you're getting better.
(You don't care about the improvement while you're playing, because playing is its own reward. But when you're not playing, you can congratulate yourself about that improvement, and look forward to your next session.)

IOW, it's a matter of attitude: learning to forget about the future and focus on the present. Music only exists in the present. Make this riff - this chord, this song - sound good now. That's not just a matter of the right notes in the right order; it's about expression, tone, etc. That simple song you learned ages ago can (should!) have new life breathed into it.

Of course, there could be an even simpler, shorter answer: you need other musicians to play with, someone to share your endeavour. Music is a social art - like sport, it makes little sense as a private pursuit. (It can be therapeutic, true, but that's only half the story.)
We should all want to either play for someone, or with someone, or ideally both. It doesn't have to be huge numbers of fans, it can be a few close friends or family. It's not about getting approval and applause (although that's nice!), it's about creating a good time for everyone. As a musician, you have valuable, primal social role.
That's obviously a reason to want to get better! But it starts by viewing music as a present-moment activity - that's its magic.
The words "live" and "play" are critical for music, in all their senses - make them your watchwords. (Forget words like "work", or "practice" - they're deadly.)
__________________
"There's only two kinds of music: good and bad. I like both kinds." - Duke Ellington.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 09-11-2017, 04:55 AM
SunnyDee SunnyDee is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 760
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guitar Slim II View Post
You act as if learning the songs you want to learn is trivial. For a player, it's kind of the whole point...

But when you say you "learned a song", did you learn it note-for-note like the guitar player on the record played it? And could you nail it?

If you can already do that -- that is, play just like B.B. or Hendrix or Clapton or Knopfler et al -- well, you're probably already beyond what most teachers can teach you.

But if you can't play it note-for-note, in real time, then you haven't really learned the song, IMO. That should be the goal: play what the cats are playing, right down to their signature licks and favorite chord voicings. And really play it: in time, with the record or with other musicians.

And even if you don't really want to play covers long-term, you master a style by mastering the masters. That's how you make a style part of your own musical DNA.

Styles like blues and rock are usually pretty basic, the harmony is pretty straightforward compared to jazz or classical. What can you do, then, but just try to be a better player? And the best way to do that is to learn from great players...they're the best teachers you'll ever have.
I'm always interested in how people learn. This certainly describes a way to become very skilled, but I wonder, when you learn this way, it would take a great deal of time, so when do you develop your own style?

I mean, none of the players you mention got great by copying others. Here's BB King's words on how he developed his vibrato: "So I always equated the bottleneck with that sound. I used to hear records from the islands, like Hawaii, and the guitar player would sound something similar to that, too. So what I would do is take the guitar, the neck of the guitar, and every time I played it, twirled my hand like this. My stupid ears were saying that sounds similar to what they were doing. And every time I pick up a guitar that's the first thing I try to do. I just trill my hand. It got better at it. I can't really show you, but holding the neck of the guitar, you grab a note and just trill your hand. It's just grab the note and you just hold it. But after I practiced for a while, you learn that you can sustain it. I could hold it until I get ready to turn it loose."

I guess it comes back to what others are saying... what's the goal?
__________________
"Militantly left-handed."

Lefty Acoustics

Martin 00-15M
Taylor 320e Baritone
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 09-11-2017, 07:24 AM
LNW LNW is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 5
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guitar Slim II View Post
You act as if learning the songs you want to learn is trivial. For a player, it's kind of the whole point...

But when you say you "learned a song", did you learn it note-for-note like the guitar player on the record played it? And could you nail it?

If you can already do that -- that is, play just like B.B. or Hendrix or Clapton or Knopfler et al -- well, you're probably already beyond what most teachers can teach you.

But if you can't play it note-for-note, in real time, then you haven't really learned the song, IMO. That should be the goal: play what the cats are playing, right down to their signature licks and favorite chord voicings. And really play it: in time, with the record or with other musicians.

And even if you don't really want to play covers long-term, you master a style by mastering the masters. That's how you make a style part of your own musical DNA.

Styles like blues and rock are usually pretty basic, the harmony is pretty straightforward compared to jazz or classical. What can you do, then, but just try to be a better player? And the best way to do that is to learn from great players...they're the best teachers you'll ever have.
Thanks for sharing your thoughts and opinions regarding my question! Good food for thought. I completely agree that there is an aspect where I do enjoy letting the "greats" be my teachers. For instance, I really enjoyed working through a guitar book on Eric Clapton's acoustic album and learned a lot from that.

However, and this is related in part to my time playing classical guitar, is that at least at this point in my life, I'd rather learn some "tools" for my toolbox to improve anything I'm playing, whether by myself or jamming with others. Instead of putting in hours to really master the Moonlight Sonata or some complex song by Clapton, I'd rather put in that same time learning tools to create my own jams...finding more chord progressions I like, figuring out how to do solos better, finding cool new chord voicings, etc. So instead of just merely playing covers, I'll have a firm grasp on the theory behind their musical understanding (the chords, scales, licks, etc)...and create my own style and play the way I want to play, too. I want my "messing around on the guitar" to get better by learning new things I can incorporate into all of that.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 09-11-2017, 07:25 AM
LNW LNW is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 5
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by tonyo View Post
I'd say part of the answer to your question lies in what you want to do.

We have the good fortune of living close (one hour drive) to a very active acoustic music club. This means the social aspect of playing to others / with others gives me all sorts of inspiration and keeps me from plateauing.

If you can find a social group of like mind, see how that helps you out.
I've never heard of such an idea as an acoustic music club. Awesome! I'll definitely look up if there's a good one in my area. Great idea.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 09-11-2017, 07:46 AM
LNW LNW is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 5
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JonPR View Post
IMO that's the wrong angle to start with. The prime aim should be to play music you enjoy, perhaps with a goal of performing with or to others. "Bettering guitar skills" are just a means to the end.
The only good reason to want to improve your skills is if there is music you want to play but are currently unable to play it. Just improving skills for the sake of it is likely to lead to boredom, and wondering what it's all for.

(Sorry if you take all this for granted - I'm being pedantic!)
Jon, you're exactly right. I appreciate your perspective on this. You kinda hit the nail on the head with part of the issue that's keeping me stuck where I'm at without getting where I want to be. I have this fuzzy idea in my head of what I want to sound more like ("playing music I enjoy")...and that is the reason I want to "better my guitar skills." I absolutely don't want to "better my guitar skills" simply for the boring sake of improving them...that would definitely bore me and cause me to peter out...BUT I just don't have a clear idea of how to improve so I'm playing like I want to play.

Maybe part of the issue is my inability to even really put-to-words what I want to sound more like to improve what I enjoy now about playing. The best way I can think of how to explain what I want to improve is just to list specific areas: I love finding new chord voicings, I love chords up high on the neck that work with some open strings, I love the sound of acoustic blues with a pick and then soloing around that, I love blues and jazz chord progressions. And I know that sometimes I just have to try things to find what I like.


I know, too, that there's still a lot of music in these genres out there that I haven't heard, more than just the usual "greats" everyone knows like Hendrix, Clapton, Page, etc.

Like I answered another post on this thread, I do enjoy playing songs I've worked hard on to learn...very much so...and I do learn many things I can carry over into my own style. But I get to a point where I want to learn more HOW they came to create these songs (the theory, scales, etc), rather than just learning to be a parrot and cover their songs...which is a ton of fun too, in its own way. For instance, like when I play the Rain Song by Led Zeppelin...I love it, play it a lot...but it doesn't really carry over a lot into teaching me more things I can use when I'm just messing around. But maybe that's also because I don't mess around a lot with alternate tunings.

Or maybe, like you suggested, I just need to keep moving on to new songs I enjoy if my usual things get a little boring to me. Good point. And maybe part of my difficulty with this is that as a player, I love playing acoustic...but so much of what I listen to is moreso electric guitar. I mean, as long as its playable on acoustic, it doesn't bother me...but I can't do any wild Jimmy Page solos on an acoustic.

Anyway, I appreciate you sharing your thoughts. I do think I need to moreso orient my focus on the music I love, rather than developing skills in isolation. Very good point. But at the same time...if anything I've said above makes sense...I also kinda want to learn the theory/background/techniques that led many great guitarists to create their own songs and styles. And thank you, too, for that emphasis that music is a SOCIAL art, not just a private pursuit - very true, and that's a good point. Thanks again.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 09-11-2017, 08:07 AM
Old Poseur Old Poseur is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Front Range of Colorado
Posts: 36
Default

I've tried to learn to play guitar in fits and starts since I was a kid. I always stopped before I got very far. I started again a year ago at age 59 and am making great progress. What has changed?

In prior attempts I was given or bought a crap guitar that wasn't set up properly, making it very difficult to play. I choose (or my parents choose) teachers that were not suitable - they didn't teach music I wanted to play, they taught by a pre-conceived model (starting with scales and horrible songs) rather than figuring out my interests, or they had the personality of a brillo pad and I couldn't relate to them. I really didn't know where I wanted to go with the guitar and, as a result, got nowhere. I didn't practice consistently with goals set. I was bored. I let other priorities or non-priorities take priority. I tried to teach myself from books or watching on line lessons, and didn't have a place to get feedback. I didn't play for others.

This time I made a commitment to myself to learn the instrument and some music theory - to make it a priority.

I bought myself a nice guitar and have, during the past year, bought and sold a couple of others until I got a guitar that I was really comfortable with and loved - which you can only really tell by playing each one for a while. Body shape, neck shape, nut width, type of strings, and tone woods all matter. We only have a limited time on this earth and playing unsuitable instruments that you don't enjoy makes no sense to me. I had a professional luthier set up each guitar.

I chose a guitar teacher (a live human being) who loves the music I love, has an open and caring approach to teaching, is an enthusiastic supporter, and isn't afraid to give constructive critiques. She is also a terrific musician herself, pushes me, and has a great sense of humor (which is necessary to put up with my antics). She realizes that this is supposed to be fun and she makes it so. To me, it's key to start with a real live teacher (you can supplement with books and videos) and I look forward to my weekly lessons.

I now live in a community that loves and lives music and is filled with musicians. I know that this isn't something that is available to everyone, but it's made a big difference. I'm constantly surrounded by live music and, in particular, live music that I love.

I learn songs and styles that I listen to, love, and that speak to me. I don't listen to Segovia and Django, so there isn't much point to force feed that music to me to learn. I acknowledge their brilliance - but their music just isn't for me.

I play at a local monthly beginners bluegrass jam. There is lots of support, no judgement, and it's a lot of fun to play lots of different songs with a diverse group of people playing different instruments. It has also improved my rhythm playing by leaps and bounds.

I set the goal of playing an open mic (which I did last week and which I'll do again next month). Trust me, this was a terrifying concept for me - I never sing or play in public, even for friends. But getting out of my comfort zone pushed me to practice, focus, and learn new material. It was a terrific experience and I can't tell you how much love and support I got from friends and strangers alike. Alcohol did not hurt.

At this point I'm hooked and playing and singing has become an important part of my life that I intend to continue for as long as I can. I hope the same for you.

Cheers, Chris
__________________
"I guess if you keep making the same mistake long enough, it becomes your style" - John Prine
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 09-11-2017, 08:13 AM
LNW LNW is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 5
Default

Old Poseur,

Thanks for sharing your experience! Very helpful to relate to myself, in some ways. And that's awesome having a real/live and good teacher has really gone a long way (more than books and online lessons), as well as being part of a vibrant musical community! That's great to hear how the monthly bluegrass jam and open mic night have stretched you and got you out of your comfort zone. You've definitely given me some things to think about. Thanks again.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 09-11-2017, 09:38 AM
kenzie1 kenzie1 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 1
Default same story

LNW, Your recent experience and mine are almost exactly alike. I also hit a wall and could not move forward, became frustrated and put the guitar down, which unintentionally lasted years. Just in the last few weeks I began playing again. (if you can call it that) Right now I am just brushing up on old skills and songs and allready finding out I am stuck in a rut.
My solution was to visit as many instructors as i could, until I find one that I hope, will fit my needs. When talking with them I directly asked why I should take lessons from them. How they think they can help me progress and if they had the same problem we are having. You would be surprised how many stammer or start fast talking. I do not plan on taking lessons on a long term basis. Basically only to help get me past the rough stuff. for me, I believe this is the only option open. good luck on what ever you decide to do.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 09-11-2017, 09:46 AM
reeve21 reeve21 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Central Connecticut, USA
Posts: 1,045
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LNW View Post
I have an interest in getting better at acoustic blues (for starters)...whether rhythm guitar, improv soloing, some mix of both, new licks, etc. But I have a fuzzy idea of how to get there, what to do. I just don't know where to start. Some ideas I've had are to get a comprehensive book on acoustic blues, or to get one book I found that gives you a new guitar lick to learn each day for a year. Or maybe start taking guitar lessons again.

Thanks for reading my (lengthy) question, and for any suggestions, encouragement and input you may have!
I was in the same boat several months back.

I got a hold of some Mark Hanson, Toby Walker and Woody Mann books, cd's, videos. A great start in fingerpicking and acoustic blues in particular.

Learned several beginner tunes, but felt like I was stalled. Not getting better and taking a very long time to learn a tune.

As a dedicated DIY'er it was a big step to decide to take lessons for the first time. But I realized I had some poor technique and it was holding me back from learning songs I wanted to play.

I'm a month into weekly lessons, nothing but exercises and a couple hour of practice a day. I can see very noticeable improvement. Highly recommended!

Good luck, I think you are asking the right questions.
__________________
Bob

Martin MMV Dread spruce/rosewood 2012
Ibanez AW-30 Dread spruce top 198?
Alvarez Grateful Dead OM cedar top 2016
Ibanez AC 240 OM Mahogany top 2017
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 09-11-2017, 11:16 AM
Mandobart Mandobart is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Washington State
Posts: 814
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LNW View Post
I've never heard of such an idea as an acoustic music club. Awesome! I'll definitely look up if there's a good one in my area. Great idea.
I live in a pretty small town, with several other small towns nearby. I belong to three acoustic music organizations that hold weekly or monthly jams, annual festivals and several workshops throughout the year. The single thing that led to continuing, fast, sustained improvement in my playing over the past 10 years has been regularly playing music with other people. No amount of private woodsheding, books, tutorials, or even lessons has come close.

Now, you're still going to plateau. We all do. The key is to recognize it and actively work to overcome it. One other thing that has helped me is Pandora. I type in an artist I like and it uses some algorithm to pick other artists that it considers similar. Some are unfathomable to me, but every once in a while I hear a new song or artist that really grabs me and I have new tunes to work on.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 09-11-2017, 01:26 PM
Guitar Slim II Guitar Slim II is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 27
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SunnyDee View Post
I mean, none of the players you mention got great by copying others.

I guess it comes back to what others are saying... what's the goal?
Sorry, but where did you hear this!? Great players didn't get great by learning from other great players? I must disagree!

The much-told BB King story is about him trying to emulate the sound and style of a player he admired. Isn't that "copying?" And are you saying that Eric and Jimi never dropped a needle on a record or copped a solo? I would bet money that every one of them learned at least one BB King song, for example, and a bunch of his licks.

Personal style will develop, as it did for the players above. Meantime, players should work on getting better in styles they love -- by playing the songs and artists they love!
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 09-11-2017, 01:54 PM
Guitar Slim II Guitar Slim II is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 27
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LNW View Post
Thanks for sharing your thoughts and opinions regarding my question! Good food for thought. I completely agree that there is an aspect where I do enjoy letting the "greats" be my teachers. For instance, I really enjoyed working through a guitar book on Eric Clapton's acoustic album and learned a lot from that.

However, and this is related in part to my time playing classical guitar, is that at least at this point in my life, I'd rather learn some "tools" for my toolbox to improve anything I'm playing, whether by myself or jamming with others. Instead of putting in hours to really master the Moonlight Sonata or some complex song by Clapton, I'd rather put in that same time learning tools to create my own jams...finding more chord progressions I like, figuring out how to do solos better, finding cool new chord voicings, etc. So instead of just merely playing covers, I'll have a firm grasp on the theory behind their musical understanding (the chords, scales, licks, etc)...and create my own style and play the way I want to play, too. I want my "messing around on the guitar" to get better by learning new things I can incorporate into all of that.
Sounds to me like what you really want to do is write music. That's a whole different thing.

Have you ever tried to do any home recording? Software these days is relatively inexpensive, you can make a whole multitrack recording in your spare room these days. Writing and recording is certainly a whole different level of engagement from just practicing.

So quit wasting time on this forum, and go write a song. Then record it and let us hear it.

Last edited by Guitar Slim II; 09-11-2017 at 02:45 PM.
Reply With Quote
Reply

  The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > PLAY

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:52 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, The Acoustic Guitar Forum
vB Ad Management by =RedTyger=