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  #16  
Old 10-13-2017, 10:10 AM
mattbn73 mattbn73 is offline
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There's a good reason there aren't common "default" fingerings which everyone uses. Harmonic minor is a beast. I'd imagine that most players use approaches which are geared more toward specific situations than on genetic fingerings which work in all circumstances. Jazz players are more likely to have default fingerings for harmonic minor, but they will incorporate a lot of stretches and are again, kind of beastly.

Honestly, outside of jazz, I would gear things around one-octave-or-less, smaller scale patterns. A seven-note scale, from 6th of harmonic minor descending to the 7th is actually pretty simple. It works well for that V7, and lays out very well in multiple positions on the instrument. For E7, in the key of C: that's F-E-D-C-B-A-G#, And you can basically do that by simply thinking key of C for everything except last note anyway. Old-timer's trick to avoid learning a whole new scale fingering, and works pretty well. Do the same by taking off the top two notes: D-C-B-A-G#. The awkward augmented second is the main problem with playing harmonic minor, and these smaller patterns of with that.

Honestly, many folks are probably just thinking "add a G-sharp to the natural minor".

Last edited by mattbn73; 10-13-2017 at 04:03 PM.
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  #17  
Old 10-13-2017, 03:06 PM
tonyo tonyo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SunnyDee View Post
Why don't people just learn the interval pattern and play that everywhere no matter what note they start on or what the note names are? I'm really asking.
How does one go about learning the interval pattern. Is there a tutorial you can link to?
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  #18  
Old 10-13-2017, 03:41 PM
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rick-slo rick-slo is offline
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Originally Posted by tonyo View Post
How does one go about learning the interval pattern. Is there a tutorial you can link to?
On the internet every where you look.

However say it's any major scale, there are two half steps (between notes 2 and 3 and notes 7 and 8). You can do that up and down on one string without much thought. Crossing over to different strings as you go up and down the scale you start considering patterns (which depends on the tuning your guitar is set to). With ascending cross strings patterns beginning from the root note I often start off major scales on the middle finger and minor scales on the index finger.

In the actual tunes what are frequently used are not pure diatonic scales played in linear directions. Also the use of open strings can allow time for quite a bit leaping up and down the fretboard during your solo note lines.
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  #19  
Old 10-13-2017, 05:19 PM
zhunter zhunter is offline
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Originally Posted by rick-slo View Post
On the internet every where you look.

However say it's any major scale, there are two half steps (between notes 2 and 3 and notes 7 and 8). You can do that up and down on one string without much thought. Crossing over to different strings as you go up and down the scale you start considering patterns (which depends on the tuning your guitar is set to). With ascending cross strings patterns beginning from the root note I often start off major scales on the middle finger and minor scales on the index finger.

In the actual tunes what are frequently used are not pure diatonic scales played in linear directions. Also the use of open strings can allow time for quite a bit leaping up and down the fretboard during your solo note lines.
3 and 4

hunter
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  #20  
Old 10-13-2017, 05:26 PM
Guitar Slim II Guitar Slim II is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rick-slo View Post
However say it's any major scale, there are two half steps (between notes 2 and 3 and notes 7 and 8). You can do that up and down on one string without much thought. Crossing over to different strings as you go up and down the scale you start considering patterns (which depends on the tuning your guitar is set to). With ascending cross strings patterns beginning from the root note I often start off major scales on the middle finger and minor scales on the index finger.

In the actual tunes what are frequently used are not pure diatonic scales played in linear directions. Also the use of open strings can allow time for quite a bit leaping up and down the fretboard during your solo note lines.
I guess the question is, what is the best order to learn this stuff? if you're just starting to learn it?

What you're talking about is what every decent improviser does in time...intuitively putting your finger on the right string and fret to play the next note you hear in your head -- that note being some interval away from the previous note.

But in my experience, this is way too complicated for most beginners. I've had far more success with the old-fashioned method: learn the traditional patterns in a couple of positions first. Learn to use them as the "framework" for soloing, and how to "plug in" riffs and licks you hear into those patterns and positions. Gradually, you get more proficient, more free, and more comfortable exploring these patterns, and adding to them.

And, since the OP asked in the OP, here are a couple of the patterns I'm talking about:
http://www.acousticguitarforum.com/f...d.php?t=485908

The longer you play, the more sophisticated your understanding becomes. I think sometimes advanced players forget the long path they walked before reaching their own unique insights. But I believe a solid foundation (note names and roots, patterns and positions, etc.) is a great advantage to any student going forward.

Last edited by Guitar Slim II; 10-13-2017 at 05:32 PM.
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  #21  
Old 10-13-2017, 05:43 PM
SunnyDee SunnyDee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tonyo View Post
How does one go about learning the interval pattern. Is there a tutorial you can link to?
Any list like this is a good place to start. http://www.guitarscholar.co.uk/lesso...l-patterns.php

I'm happy to share what I've found useful in PM.
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