The Acoustic Guitar Forum

Go Back   The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > Electric Guitars

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 10-24-2017, 06:41 PM
BoneDigger's Avatar
BoneDigger BoneDigger is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Tyler, TX
Posts: 4,224
Default Fender Twin Reverb: is this a problem?

I just bought a used Fender 65 reissue twin reverb. I love the tone! My question... When I put it in standby, the amp makes a fairly loud sound, almost like an echoing reverb tone, then a pop. It does the same when I switch into or out of standby. Is this normal? I bought this used at GC for a decent price, so I'd prefer to figure out if it needs fixing rather than just return it, but if it's a major fix, I'll return it and get something else.

Ideas?
__________________

In my abode, there are lots of guitars, lots of banjos and mandolins too. There's even a bass guitar and dulcimer sitting there, so I can make music for you!


www.mcmakinmusic.com
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 10-24-2017, 06:51 PM
Bob Womack's Avatar
Bob Womack Bob Womack is offline
Guitar Gourmet
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Between Clever and Stupid
Posts: 20,188
Default

My '65 Deluxe Reverb Reissue does the same. I bought it new. Everyone says not to worry about it.

Bob
__________________
"It is said, 'Go not to the elves for counsel for they will say both no and yes.' "
Frodo Baggins to Gildor Inglorion, The Fellowship of the Ring

THE MUSICIAN'S ROOM
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-24-2017, 07:07 PM
BoneDigger's Avatar
BoneDigger BoneDigger is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Tyler, TX
Posts: 4,224
Default

Thanks Bob! That puts my mind to ease a bit.
__________________

In my abode, there are lots of guitars, lots of banjos and mandolins too. There's even a bass guitar and dulcimer sitting there, so I can make music for you!


www.mcmakinmusic.com

Last edited by BoneDigger; 10-24-2017 at 07:25 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-24-2017, 08:58 PM
rockabilly69 rockabilly69 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Ogden, Utah
Posts: 1,133
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BoneDigger View Post
I just bought a used Fender 65 reissue twin reverb. I love the tone! My question... When I put it in standby, the amp makes a fairly loud sound, almost like an echoing reverb tone, then a pop. It does the same when I switch into or out of standby. Is this normal? I bought this used at GC for a decent price, so I'd prefer to figure out if it needs fixing rather than just return it, but if it's a major fix, I'll return it and get something else.

Ideas?
Is the master volume down when you come out of standby?
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-24-2017, 09:00 PM
BoneDigger's Avatar
BoneDigger BoneDigger is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Tyler, TX
Posts: 4,224
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rockabilly69 View Post
Is the master volume down when you come out of standby?
No, it's in whatever position I stopped in. Does it need to be turned down?
__________________

In my abode, there are lots of guitars, lots of banjos and mandolins too. There's even a bass guitar and dulcimer sitting there, so I can make music for you!


www.mcmakinmusic.com
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-24-2017, 09:07 PM
jseth jseth is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Oregon... "Heart of the Valley"...
Posts: 8,052
Default

My '75 Deluxe Reverb does the same thing id the volume is up and the reverb is on... basically, it's the power surge, going from 0-60 when you flip that switch, would be my best guess. I've owned a few old Fender amps and played through a BUNCH of them, and all the ones that had the standby switch do the same thing.

Turn down the main volume for the channel you are using and dis-engage the reverb; that will quiet it down a lot.

There is much discussion about the "right way" to both warm up an old Fender tube amp and to turn it off... one school of thought is to flip BOTH switches UP when you turn it on (but have the volume on your guitar/channel down), let the tubes warm up for a bit (5-10 minutes) and you're good to go... then hit both switches DOWN simultaneously when you turn the amp off.

I use the stand-by for the warm-up period, but hit both switches when I turn it off...

I think the most important things are to let those tubes warm up before you start playing, and to be sure not to move or jostle the amp when you first turn it off, letting the tubes cool before they get moved around...

A Twin, eh? Well, you must have a MUCH stronger back than I have! They are great amps; haven't tried one of the re-issues yet, but if they're even close to the "real deal", they must be very good and VERY loud!
__________________
"There was no love, in the backwards glance...
there were no long drawn out good-byes.
There was some pain and some anger,
just beneath the surface,
but her words never matched the look in her eyes.
there was no love..."

(Untitled)
(J.S.Sherman
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-24-2017, 09:45 PM
BoneDigger's Avatar
BoneDigger BoneDigger is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Tyler, TX
Posts: 4,224
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jseth View Post
My '75 Deluxe Reverb does the same thing id the volume is up and the reverb is on... basically, it's the power surge, going from 0-60 when you flip that switch, would be my best guess. I've owned a few old Fender amps and played through a BUNCH of them, and all the ones that had the standby switch do the same thing.

Turn down the main volume for the channel you are using and dis-engage the reverb; that will quiet it down a lot.

There is much discussion about the "right way" to both warm up an old Fender tube amp and to turn it off... one school of thought is to flip BOTH switches UP when you turn it on (but have the volume on your guitar/channel down), let the tubes warm up for a bit (5-10 minutes) and you're good to go... then hit both switches DOWN simultaneously when you turn the amp off.

I use the stand-by for the warm-up period, but hit both switches when I turn it off...

I think the most important things are to let those tubes warm up before you start playing, and to be sure not to move or jostle the amp when you first turn it off, letting the tubes cool before they get moved around...

A Twin, eh? Well, you must have a MUCH stronger back than I have! They are great amps; haven't tried one of the re-issues yet, but if they're even close to the "real deal", they must be very good and VERY loud!
Thanks for the info! Yes, it is very heavy, but I don't gig. It will just kind of sit there in one spot.
__________________

In my abode, there are lots of guitars, lots of banjos and mandolins too. There's even a bass guitar and dulcimer sitting there, so I can make music for you!


www.mcmakinmusic.com
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-24-2017, 10:49 PM
Jerry D Jerry D is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Birmingham, Alabama
Posts: 1,271
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jseth View Post
A Twin, eh? Well, you must have a MUCH stronger back than I have!
Try a SUPER Reverb. But, like Bonedigger, mine just sits there waiting for me to give it a little attention.
__________________
Acoustic:
Taylor 314ce
Alvarez AP66SB
Yamaha LL16R A.R.E.
Fishman Loudbox Mini

Electric:
1966 Fender Super Reverb
2016 Fender Champion 40
1968 Fender Thinline Tele
2015 Epiphone ES-339 Pro
2016 Fender MIA American Standard Strat
2017 Gibson SG
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-24-2017, 11:21 PM
jomaynor jomaynor is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Georgia
Posts: 1,066
Default

(info from an expert, Bruce Zinky (Dr. Z))


Here are some simple dos and doníts when using a standby switch:

* Always use a standby switch when dealing with a solid state rectified amp.
The immediate surge of high voltage on a tube isnít the best for its long-
term life.

* Power on your amp, then wait a minute or so and engage standby switch.
This is the proper use of a standby switch.

* Turn standby switch off if you are switching speaker cabs, engaging a half-
power or triode/pentode mode on amps with these features.

* Engage standby switch when taking a break.

* When you power down your amp, just turn off power switch and leave
standby switch on. This will safely drain high voltage from your transformer
and filter caps for safe transportation.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 11-07-2017, 03:39 PM
HesNot HesNot is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Charlotte, NC
Posts: 17
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jseth View Post
My '75 Deluxe Reverb does the same thing id the volume is up and the reverb is on... basically, it's the power surge, going from 0-60 when you flip that switch, would be my best guess. I've owned a few old Fender amps and played through a BUNCH of them, and all the ones that had the standby switch do the same thing.

Turn down the main volume for the channel you are using and dis-engage the reverb; that will quiet it down a lot.

There is much discussion about the "right way" to both warm up an old Fender tube amp and to turn it off... one school of thought is to flip BOTH switches UP when you turn it on (but have the volume on your guitar/channel down), let the tubes warm up for a bit (5-10 minutes) and you're good to go... then hit both switches DOWN simultaneously when you turn the amp off.

I use the stand-by for the warm-up period, but hit both switches when I turn it off...

I think the most important things are to let those tubes warm up before you start playing, and to be sure not to move or jostle the amp when you first turn it off, letting the tubes cool before they get moved around...

A Twin, eh? Well, you must have a MUCH stronger back than I have! They are great amps; haven't tried one of the re-issues yet, but if they're even close to the "real deal", they must be very good and VERY loud!
I sold my Twin a number of years ago - it was a great amp but as noted it was heavy and I'm not getting any younger...

And to quote Daniel Donato a Twin has a LOT of clean headroom!
__________________
Yamaha FG-350W
Yamaha AC3R
1982 Epiphone Sheraton
PRS SE Torero
Ibanez Talman TM303M

Blackstar HT40
Peavey Classic 20 MH/Ampeg 1x12
Hughes & Kettner Tubemeister 5/HK110

Too many pedals!
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 11-08-2017, 10:59 AM
redir redir is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Mountains of Virginia
Posts: 3,698
Default

Interesting. My '72 Twin does not have that problem at all. I've owned it for 30 years now and have always turned it on by flipping the two switches up unless I was setting up on stage, then I would flip the power on with the stand by set on to let it warm up as I set up. I always turn it off by flipping both switches.

I can't imagine having to have to adjust the volume or reverb just to use the stand by. That kind of defeats the point, you want to just put it in hibernation so that everything is set right when you get back on stage. If that was the case then I'd just turn the guitar volume off and or volume pedal or some floor switch.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 01-19-2018, 12:19 AM
BT55 BT55 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: NY
Posts: 251
Default

My amp tech recommends warming up the Amp with the Standby off and powering off by turning off standby first, wait a few minutes then power off the Amp.
__________________
Taylor 520ce, 326ce-K FLTD, 414ce, 454ce, T5z Classic
Martin GPCPA4 SIRIS
Rainsong Hybrid Series H-OM1000N2
Vonage-Air VAD-04
Custom Build Les Paul
Fender Stratocaster
Hot Rod Deville Amp, Fishman Loudbox Performer
Reply With Quote
Reply

  The Acoustic Guitar Forum > General Acoustic Guitar and Amplification Discussion > Electric Guitars

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:51 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, The Acoustic Guitar Forum
vB Ad Management by =RedTyger=