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  #16  
Old 12-07-2017, 01:32 PM
jseth jseth is offline
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The Mickey Baker "Complete Course in Jazz Guitar", volume I.... the very first "lesson" is a page full of great "jazzy-sounding" chords, and the next few lessons are all about moving the chords around the fretboard...

It is a great book, been around a long time... modern theory and harmony have changed a few names of the chords, but it's still a terrific learning device. In an interview I read about Robben Ford, I remember the fellow asking hm if he ever had lessons or worked from books, etc... and Robben replied that the ONLY book he ever used was this one, and he only got through book I... but he added that he WORKED that first book and knew it backwards and forwards!

Not a lot of harmony and theory in this one, but it's a great place to start. I've had this book for at least 3 (maybe 4?) decades, and I still haven't gone all the way through it... but I use the chords on that first page, EVERY TIME I PLAY!
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  #17  
Old 12-07-2017, 01:45 PM
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vindibona1 vindibona1 is offline
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Here is a simple way to think of it...

You have your basic cowboy chords, G,C,D,E,A, Em, Am, plus their 7th variations. When you move up the neck, each fret is equal to being 1/2 step higher, two frets a whole step.

So let's use Am as a relatively easy example... if you move that chord up two frets you have Bm. But with the standard Am fingering of 2-3-1 if you move that up two frets you still have strings 1, 5 and 6 still open and that has to be moved up too. What to do? You change the Am fingering to 3-4-2 and then the index finger bars the 2nd fret (just above the 2nd finger) to act a a capo. And voila, you have Bm. you can leave the 6th string un-strummed as the 5th string is the root of the chord, but the 6th string's F# is still in within the chord and you can still play it if you like the way it sounds.

It's the same with the E chord which may be even a better example. Change the fingering to 3-4-2, slide it up and use the index as a capo to bar the fret above it. Slide it up one fret and you have a fully barred F maj chord. Two more frets and you have a G major, etc.

The A chord has a couple different fingering variations. You can finger the A major as 2-3-4 or 3-2-4 , OR, (my preferred fingering) bar the 2nd fret 2nd, 3rd, 4th string with the ring finger. Then you slide everything down one fret, apply the index finger bar and you have Bb.

The D and C shapes are a litle more difficult but with practice can be done similarly. Even the G shape can be done with a stretch, but uses the same principle. It's all largely a matter of knowing your basic chords and knowing the names of the notes on the lower strings.

Good luck.
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  #18  
Old 12-07-2017, 01:47 PM
jawjatek jawjatek is offline
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I saw jump blues and swing master Junior Watson at a bar up in Minn once. We were smoking cigars during the break and I asked him where he learned all the cool chords he uses, and he said "get the Mickey Baker books". At the time I was guitarist in an Atlanta bar blues/swing band and tried, but those books are tough.

I like the classic "Chord Chemistry" book. It has all of "Guitar George's" chords, and a really good appendix on theory that helped me immensely. ETA: by Ted Greene.
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  #19  
Old 12-07-2017, 05:44 PM
musicman1951 musicman1951 is offline
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I've got a book somewhere that has about 25 different chord shapes up and down the neck for any chord you want - if that's what you're looking for. I'm sure there are chord books available, but let me know if you want the title and I'll find it.

If you want the theory I can give you a thumbnail sketch:

Chords are comprised of every other note of a scale. C = C, E, G (first, third and fifth notes of the C chord). C7 is a flat (lowered a half-step) note from the 7th in a scale: C7 = C, E, G, Bb. If they want the regular 7th from the major scale they call it C maj7 (sometimes abbreviated to C with a triangle in some jazz music).

That's the only weird one (7th). The C9, C11 and C13 are basically fancy C7 chords. If you just count up the scale (or play up the scale) you'll get to the 9th note (D). Then you add that to your C7.

I hope that was clear. You will run out of fingers (and it will sound too muddy anyway) when you get to C11 or C13 to use all the notes (C13= C, E, G, Bb, D, F, A), so you have to leave some out. The notes you really want to keep - the 3rd, 7th and 13th.

My recommendation is to get a chord book (or maybe find a site that has a bunch of chord choices) and pick a song to start with. Learn the chords you need for that song and take it from there.
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  #20  
Old 12-07-2017, 05:58 PM
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check out the poster about 1/4 the way down this pdf:
https://www.howmusicreallyworks.com/...reeEdition.pdf
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  #21  
Old 12-07-2017, 08:42 PM
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Just pretend you are playing lead. Pick the root note you want to work around somewhere on the neck. Play your lead based on a scale rooted there.

But, the trick is just play the first (root), third and fifth notes and dance around those. Being a lead guitarist that is easy for you. Now, just play those three at the same time. That's the simplest form of a chord formation.

The rest is just flavorings on top of (or in place of) those three notes.

Drop the third to make it a minor.

Add another note for ambience. Or move a note for an inversion.

Start with that though - it's an area you know better than most of us I would bet.
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  #22  
Old 12-07-2017, 10:09 PM
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Why would I want my chords CAGED?
I want to set them loose, run free, live wild. Free range at minimum.
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  #23  
Old 12-08-2017, 01:22 AM
Martie Martie is offline
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My son has been working through this and is particularly enthusiastic about it...

https://www.musictheoryforguitar.com...r-lessons.html
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  #24  
Old 12-08-2017, 07:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fazool View Post
Just pretend you are playing lead. Pick the root note you want to work around somewhere on the neck. Play your lead based on a scale rooted there.

But, the trick is just play the first (root), third and fifth notes and dance around those. Being a lead guitarist that is easy for you. Now, just play those three at the same time. That's the simplest form of a chord formation.

The rest is just flavorings on top of (or in place of) those three notes.

Drop the third to make it a minor.

Add another note for ambience. Or move a note for an inversion.

Start with that though - it's an area you know better than most of us I would bet.
That makes a ton of sense for me. Thank you!
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  #25  
Old 12-08-2017, 07:24 AM
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Shades of Blue Shades of Blue is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jseth View Post
The Mickey Baker "Complete Course in Jazz Guitar", volume I.... the very first "lesson" is a page full of great "jazzy-sounding" chords, and the next few lessons are all about moving the chords around the fretboard...

It is a great book, been around a long time... modern theory and harmony have changed a few names of the chords, but it's still a terrific learning device. In an interview I read about Robben Ford, I remember the fellow asking hm if he ever had lessons or worked from books, etc... and Robben replied that the ONLY book he ever used was this one, and he only got through book I... but he added that he WORKED that first book and knew it backwards and forwards!

Not a lot of harmony and theory in this one, but it's a great place to start. I've had this book for at least 3 (maybe 4?) decades, and I still haven't gone all the way through it... but I use the chords on that first page, EVERY TIME I PLAY!
Fantastic! Thank you!
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