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  #31  
Old 12-06-2017, 11:36 AM
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Toby Walker Toby Walker is offline
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Originally Posted by AndrewG View Post
I haven't played one of these, but nearly three grand for essentially a copy of a $12.75 (1933 prices), guitar, 'authentic' glue blobs and all, seems an awful lot of money.
And yet, when you finally do play one, we'd sure like to hear what you have to say then.
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  #32  
Old 12-06-2017, 11:40 AM
Borderdon Borderdon is offline
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Fine looking guitar, I'm hoping to try one, but so far, they're pretty scarce in these parts.
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  #33  
Old 12-06-2017, 11:53 AM
Willie Voltaire Willie Voltaire is offline
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Are the glue globs a little kitschy? Yes, I think so. But otherwise the build quality is outstanding. The nut is cut perfectly, its intonation is on the money and the overtones...am I supposed to be getting overtones from a ladder braced guitar?
Exactly this ^. There's a little squeeze-out under one of the braces on my WL12, but I don't recall ever seeing any glue "blobs" on it or any of the eight or nine Waterloos that I've played.

And department-store guitars of the 1930s certainly didn't have the even-grained spruce top or solid flame maple back and sides that my WL12 has, nor the handmade quality described above.
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  #34  
Old 12-06-2017, 04:28 PM
PieterK PieterK is offline
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Might seem expensive, but you can view the Waterloos as the Japanese Miata being the well-designed, reliable replacement for the cantankerous old British Lotus Elan. Finally a great roadster that's fun to drive and you don't have to worry about it breaking down on you.
That is so apt!
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  #35  
Old 12-06-2017, 04:53 PM
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At the same time there's a marked decrease in the value of sour grapes.
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  #36  
Old 12-06-2017, 05:33 PM
Looburst Looburst is online now
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Originally Posted by Toby Walker View Post
And yet, when you finally do play one, we'd sure like to hear what you have to say then.
Yes and it seems your thinking is not focused on the right stuff, AndrewG.
By that I mean, try thinking in terms of the fact that your getting a Collings built guitar that yes, has the glue globs here and there but the intonation, construction, feel and everything else is Collings!
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  #37  
Old 12-06-2017, 06:29 PM
Twinpeaksbirds Twinpeaksbirds is offline
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Originally Posted by upsidedown View Post
Are the glue globs a little kitschy? Yes, I think so. But otherwise the build quality is outstanding.
Agreed. My WL-14LTR has glue squeeze-out, which seems a little out of character with the rest of the build-quality. The fit and finish is sublime, miles ahead of the Gibson LG-2 that I have (which I have fallen head-over-heels in love with, but that's a different story ).
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  #38  
Old 12-06-2017, 07:59 PM
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Build with high quality woods by the same builders who build Collings guitars,.. around $2k new for a lot of models, I think Waterloos are a bargain.

It's a fun guitar to play and that's as good as it gets.
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  #39  
Old 12-07-2017, 03:19 PM
DukeX DukeX is online now
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From Bill Collings:

The price came about more as a result of the sound I was after, rather than trying to hit a certain price point. Making a guitar that is accessible to more players is a good thing, but that wasn't the reason I wanted to do it. The goal was to capture a particular sound by making the guitars like they were actually made back in the depression, and that meant stripping the process down to the bare essentials.

The challenge was to figure out how to put less hours in the guitar and still make it a great guitar. The hours that do go in it are very skilled hours, but it's probably one third of what it might take to build a very high end guitar where you obsess over every detail. This means you don't clean up your glue mess. You don't worry so much about sanding the braces. You forget about trying to make a guitar with a mirror finish. You put craftsmanship in the guitar, but only where it really matters. It ends up being a no-frills utilitarian guitar, but the tone and the intrinsic value are still there.

I knew going into it that it would be a departure from Collings Guitars, but it was an area that I really wanted to explore. Not all of today's players have seen these old guitars. Not everyone is searching for them, so they're not finding them. I think people are missing out on something unique and different. Some of the originals are out there, but they are really hard to find in good shape. So much so, that you will usually have more cost in the repair work than the cost of a new guitar. So having this guitar at an affordable price allows you to get some of that Americana history in a newer instrument that will last a lifetime. The lifetime of most of the originals is over, unfortunately.
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  #40  
Old 12-08-2017, 10:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DukeX View Post
From Bill Collings:

The price came about more as a result of the sound I was after, rather than trying to hit a certain price point. Making a guitar that is accessible to more players is a good thing, but that wasn't the reason I wanted to do it. The goal was to capture a particular sound by making the guitars like they were actually made back in the depression, and that meant stripping the process down to the bare essentials.

The challenge was to figure out how to put less hours in the guitar and still make it a great guitar. The hours that do go in it are very skilled hours, but it's probably one third of what it might take to build a very high end guitar where you obsess over every detail. This means you don't clean up your glue mess. You don't worry so much about sanding the braces. You forget about trying to make a guitar with a mirror finish. You put craftsmanship in the guitar, but only where it really matters. It ends up being a no-frills utilitarian guitar, but the tone and the intrinsic value are still there.

I knew going into it that it would be a departure from Collings Guitars, but it was an area that I really wanted to explore. Not all of today's players have seen these old guitars. Not everyone is searching for them, so they're not finding them. I think people are missing out on something unique and different. Some of the originals are out there, but they are really hard to find in good shape. So much so, that you will usually have more cost in the repair work than the cost of a new guitar. So having this guitar at an affordable price allows you to get some of that Americana history in a newer instrument that will last a lifetime. The lifetime of most of the originals is over, unfortunately.
That's cool, Duke. Thanks for the share.
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