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  #1  
Old 03-16-2012, 10:01 PM
keithro keithro is offline
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Default Is this worth repairing

Hi all. My friend dropped his guitar, and the result is a cracked bottom with a seperation between the top
and the side. and the top crack is raised up like a roof. The binding is also cracked,
Is it worth repairing, and an estimate cost would be a great help.
Many thanks....

Last edited by keithro; 03-16-2012 at 10:07 PM.
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Old 03-17-2012, 07:49 AM
runamuck runamuck is offline
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It depends on the guitar.A Stradivarius in 100 pieces would still be worth
repairing but most guitars wouldn't.

Jim McCarthy

Last edited by runamuck; 03-17-2012 at 11:26 AM.
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Old 03-17-2012, 10:03 AM
marioed marioed is offline
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It would help to see some pictures and know what type of guitar it is. From your description of the damage it could probably be repaired, most types of damage can, but without seeing it it would be very hard to give any kind of estimate or tell you whether it is worth repairing.
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Ed
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Old 03-18-2012, 02:09 AM
keithro keithro is offline
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Default damaged guitar

here's the damaged guitar

http://s413.photobucket.com/albums/p...%20guitar%201/

Last edited by keithro; 03-18-2012 at 02:17 AM.
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Old 03-18-2012, 06:43 AM
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What's the make, model, and age of the guitar?
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Old 03-18-2012, 07:24 AM
keithro keithro is offline
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Default guitar make

It's a Yamaha, probably made in the late 1990s. Cedar top, rosewood back and sides. Guitar sounds ok, not fantastic, so if it cost a lot to repair, than I think it's not worth repairing. But it belongs to my friend's dad, so I can understand his worry about his father finding out.............
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Old 03-18-2012, 09:51 AM
Dogpa Dogpa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keithro View Post
It's a Yamaha, probably made in the late 1990s. Cedar top, rosewood back and sides. Guitar sounds ok, not fantastic, so if it cost a lot to repair, than I think it's not worth repairing. But it belongs to my friend's dad, so I can understand his worry about his father finding out.............
I think he'll know either way. Good luck with that one.
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Old 03-18-2012, 10:05 AM
Ned Milburn Ned Milburn is offline
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Looking to me like the price for repair is likely a few hundred bucks since the smash is not insignificant and there may be some internal issues (bracing and lining).

Take it to a qualified luthier/repairman in your area for an accurate assessment. One photo isn't enough for a full assessment.
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Old 03-18-2012, 11:26 AM
Alan Carruth Alan Carruth is offline
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If the objective is to hide the damage from your friends father, forget it. It's usually possible to do that, mind you, but that sort of 'museum quality' repair doesn't come cheap.

What you spend on the repair has to be predicated on the value of the instrument, but 'the value' is a more variable quantity than it might seem. If it's something that your friends father got a while ago, didn't play much, and just never got around to listing on e-bay, then the 'book' value would probably be a good guide. If it's the guitar he carried with him when he hitch hiked across the country and back four times to court your friend's mother while he was in the service it might well be irreplaceable, and your friend's best bet might be a witness protection program. Although it probably doesn't apply in this case, replacement value is another thing to consider. Sometimes the guitar that Aunt Tillie bought in her hippie days for next to nothing will turn out to be hard to replace at a reasonable price with anything new of comparable quality. Her old guitar could well be very well built of solid wood, and you might find it hard to get something that sounds and plays as nice for $400, even though the 'book' value is only $50.

So, the first thing for you to do is determine the value. Once you've done that, you can find out what it would cost to get a repair that would restore it's value to the owner. Note that it's not up to the repair guy to tell you what's worth doing, unless you've decided that the book value is the real one. His job is to tell you what it will cost to do what you want done. If he doesn't want to do it, you can find another repairman. I've seen too many instances of repairmen doing a quickie job on something that had a lot of sentimental value to the owner simply because it didn't have a big book value, which ruins the instrument for the owner, and makes life harder for the ethical repairmen.
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Old 03-29-2012, 07:16 AM
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IMO reparing that guitar will likely be way more expensive than than the cash value of the guitar. You obviously can't estimate or assume the sentimental value, but finanically speaking, the repair would be costly (very) and I doubt it would be unoticed. Plus a restoration of that degree would take a least a few weeks to accomplish. I'm not very familiar with Yamaha guitars. I know that some can be priced in the $1,500 (or more) range, but most are pretty affordable. If it were me, I would get the model number and start searching eBay. I just checked it our and there are many similar Yamaha guitars that can be had for far less than the cost to repair this one.

Jim
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