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Busterz
12-17-2006, 04:09 PM
I know that you can play rhythm on any guitar, but which one seems best suited for just strumming. I was thinking about a semi-hollow body electric, not a pure acoustic. I know that there are a lot of different choices, but maybe someone can reccomend a guitar from their experience. Thanks

Tahitijack
12-17-2006, 04:53 PM
You'll notice that the Gibson Les Paul has a "Rhythm" postion switch and a lot of players that focus on strumming play the LP although to me its best used by a "lead guitarist". I like the Fender Stratocaster as the best all-around/crossover/utility guitar. The Strat is equally at home playing the blues as it is playing country, rock, surf music, jazz, funk and everything in between. Although I have a Strat I enjoy playing my strat shapped guitars, PRS CU22 and McCarty. The McCarty is a nice compromise between the Les Paul and Strat, without whammy bar. Hope this helps.

whamonkey
12-17-2006, 04:55 PM
For what type of use...meaning, plugged in onstage, in an acoustic setting, etc? I say a dred is an all around great strumming body style, but grand auditoriums can be great as well. Then you have choices such as strings, wood, etc. Figure out where you will use it most and what type of music you'll be playing, then decide on the guitar. As far as an electric strummer, it's very hard to beat a Gretsch G6120 Nashville.

That is my next guitar.

FLDavid
12-17-2006, 05:08 PM
Who are your favorite rhythm players? + what do they play? = instruments to consider

Certainly a lot will depend upon your budget, the styles of music you'll be performing, and the kind of amp you'll be blowing up ~ :up:

ramsa
12-17-2006, 06:14 PM
The Samick or Epiphone jazzboxes are a nice inexpensive way to go...
Alot of bang for the buck. Ibanez also...

For extra dough the Eastman line-up looks good, but I have not played any of those...

Carry on.
And good luck!

Dave

ljguitar
12-17-2006, 06:30 PM
Hi BusterZ...
It may depend on your rhythm style and preference.

I play a thumb/fingerstyle rhythm and the bass of a LesPaul tends to compete with bass players, so I like the sound and texture of a Strat. It lets me fill holes without competing with the other players in the group. I also tend to play more of a rock rhythm than a jazz rhythm so the solid body is best for my style.

My gigging partner is a flat-pick kind of rhythm player and prefers a nice fat humbucking sound. His picks thin down the bottom end and his sounds great with his style.

reags
12-17-2006, 09:19 PM
I'm not going to recommend a specific brand or model, but just want to throw my 2cents worth to make sure you select a guitar that's a suitable weight in ratio to your body size/build. IMo, this could rule out Les Pauls as they're generally bricks to lug around (even had reports from a Gibson player's chiropractor that someone's left should was lower than their right and would have any idea how this could of happened), so consider weight when purchasing. In saying that, generally hollowbody guitars are reasonable in weight.

franchelB
12-18-2006, 10:27 AM
I can play rhythm guitar on all my guitars. You need to find out what or who's style you'd like to emulate...

Herb Hunter
12-18-2006, 10:42 AM
The best rhythm guitar is the one you like the best. John Lennon probably used a solid body Rickenbacker and a hollow body Epiphone more than anything else. David Crosby seems to have used a Gretsch hollowbody often. I like the Les Paul but I'd probably go with a Taylor T5 if I were going to play mostly rhythm. My second choice would be a Carvin AE 185 with the optional coil switches (they give one the choice of dual or single coil sound). You have to decide which is the best rhythm guitar for you.

http://www.carvin.com/products/guitar.php?ItemNumber=AE185

redpoint
12-18-2006, 12:42 PM
I always hear about how heavy a Les Paul is... how heavy is a Strat in comparison? :)

Thanks!

kilgorekid
12-18-2006, 01:05 PM
I'm with Larry on suggesting a Strat. They're way lighter than a Les Paul.

LindaLoo
12-18-2006, 01:43 PM
I'm surprised no one's mentioned a Fender Tele. I always think of them as rhythm guitars but perhaps I'm wrong in that? :confused:

Herb Hunter
12-18-2006, 03:22 PM
Perhaps it is because my first electric guitar, which I received at age fourteen, was a rather heavy, four pickup Silver Tone but I've never found the weight of the Les Paul to be objectionable. I certainly wouldn't settle for a lighter guitar if I happened to prefer the sound of the Les Paul. There are newer Les Pauls that are lighter than the original design.

ptalbot
12-18-2006, 05:20 PM
I usually reach for my modded '78 Fender Telecaster Thinline. Not exceptionally heavy, and I love the feel. Need to get a guitar that is comfortable for you and a string gauge and action that you can really 'lay into.' Other than that...as others have alluded to, need to be comfortable with the tone you are trying to get at for the song, set, etc. With my thinline and PODxtl, that has been quite easy to achieve. The POD is a relatively new acquisition...had it about 6 months and find it very useful. The guitar and I have been together for 22 years this coming spring...It's jealous of the new killer Sunburst John Mayer Signature Stratocaster...and the 414CE-L7 that has been with me for over a year now also. Trying my best to make sure they all get ample attention.

Make sure you find at least two...so they can compete of course...and show the love... ;)

webcat
12-19-2006, 01:10 AM
I'm with Larry on suggesting a Strat. They're way lighter than a Les Paul.
That's what I used to think! I brought home a Deluxe Ash Strat a couple of years ago that is considerably heavier than my Lonestar strat. I don't know if it's as heavy as a Les Paul, but I'd have to guess that it's close.

I'm sure some would argue this point, but I think Strats have a more balanced design and weight isn't as much of an issue anyway. I'm not bashing LPs, I've been gassin' for one for quite a while now, and it's not the weight that's keeping me at bay. More like the lack of weight in my bank account. ;)

'Cat

franchelB
12-19-2006, 09:48 AM
I'm surprised no one's mentioned a Fender Tele. I always think of them as rhythm guitars but perhaps I'm wrong in that? :confused:

Yes ma'am, I could've suggested "this and that" guitar (which is why I have all these guitars under my sig.), but I suggested that the poster should find what or who's style he/she wants to emulate.
No ma'am, not quite. I realise it sounds "cliche'" but Mr. Jimmy Page's solo in "Stairway to Heaven" was played on a Telecaster.

jnapo
12-20-2006, 07:36 AM
I do not think that providing an answer to your question with our recommendations is the best solution for you. Over the years I have played rhythm and lead on many guitars. The guitars had their benefits and drawbacks. You need to consider your situation, the music that you are playing. You also need to consider if you are performing covers how close to the original sound you want to come and how much you are willing to spend to achieve that end. Some of the best rhythm sound recorded come from Rickenbackers 12 Strings. I you are preforming one song that has this tone do you go out and buy one? That is up to you. The other consideration is whether you are willing to move multiple instruments to the performance and whether you will be able to transition between the instruments during the performance without impacting your fellow performers. I have found that playing for many years without a guitar tech that changing guitars during a performance can often put a unnecessary brake in the music. My solution for many years of playing has been to model the sound with electronics. It is not a perfect solution but when played in a live environment the combination of everything else that is occuring often gets you to "It is close enough for the average listener to not be able to tell the difference".

As I said from the start you need to search your soul and determine where you want to be when everything is all done. Once you have a direction I am sure that you can get better information from the community.

Please do not take this the wrong way. I do not mean to imply that the information already provided is not valuable. I just have found that once you define where you want to be you will be more happy when you get there.

steverok
12-20-2006, 08:59 AM
The best rhythm guitar is the one you like the best. John Lennon probably used a solid body Rickenbacker and a hollow body Epiphone more than anything else.

Lennon's was actually hollow, even though there is no sound hole, ala the Gretch Duo Jet. Rickenbackers are the best electric rhythm guitar in the world !

woodruff
12-20-2006, 09:07 AM
Martin D-35:D

Herb Hunter
12-20-2006, 09:10 AM
Lennon's was actually hollow, even though there is no sound hole, ala the Gretch Duo Jet. Rickenbackers are the best electric rhythm guitar in the world !

Wow. I played the Rickenbacker John Lennon model, the one with the short scale neck and never noticed it had a hollow body.

mojito
12-20-2006, 10:29 AM
I'm surprised no one's mentioned a Fender Tele. I always think of them as rhythm guitars but perhaps I'm wrong in that? :confused:

I have a '91 Telecaster and in my hands it is more a rhythm guitar but it can rip leads too. In fact I think it is a fantastic lead guitar, I just mostly play rhythm in our band but I have no problem kicking it when I need to.

markwayne
12-20-2006, 11:51 AM
I'm surprised no one's mentioned a Fender Tele. I always think of them as rhythm guitars but perhaps I'm wrong in that?

I think that Teles are are wonderful, diverse guitars. There are a couple of factors that, I feel, make Teles great rhythm guitars. One is that they, on average, have a lower output than a Strat and way lower output than a humbucker guitar. Two is that you get the neck + bridge setting that a stock Strat lacks which makes for a wonderful, full sound that still has that single-coil shimmer. Now, if you rewire your Strat to allow that pickup combination and back off the volume a bit . . .

Wayne

Mr. IJaK
12-20-2006, 12:13 PM
I think the best rhythm guitars are kinda not the most sustainful. So, stay away fro overwound pickups, tapered necks and heavy bodies, and what do you have? A tele. Or a rickenbacker. I could go on... then again, most guitars sound better on rhythm on the neck pickup. A tele can do scorching solos just fine using a neck pickup.

Using an Acoustic and putting that in the mix adds an almost percussive thing. Very good if you really want to reinforce the 'rhythms', though I accept that not what rhythm guitar is always there for.

Compurocker
12-22-2006, 11:25 AM
I think both the Fender Strat and the Gibson Les Paul are excellent all around electric guitar choices. In my opinion another incredible electric guitar is the Paul Reed Smith (PRS) CE Maple Top 22 or 24 or the Custom 22 or 24. I love them with the Wide Thin Neck and the HFS Pickups. The PRS Tremolo System is also outstanding. See them here:http://www.prsguitars.com/ There are so many great acoustic guitars out there that I can't even begin to list them all! Taylor/Martin/Goodall/Olson/Ryan/FroggyBottom/Collings/RTaylor/Breedlove/Larrivee/Morgan/Lowden Avalon/Huss&Dalton/Bourgeois/Santa Cruz and on and on... :)

FLDavid
12-22-2006, 11:37 AM
Wow. I played the Rickenbacker John Lennon model, the one with the short scale neck and never noticed it had a hollow body.

Was it like this one (http://www.rickenbacker.com/model.asp?model=350V63)?

jonesbrass
12-22-2006, 08:01 PM
Looking for the "right" electric rhythm guitar is just like looking for anything else; you've got to find the instrument that speaks to you and that you relate to. In my case, for example, I bought a Fender Fat Strat a couple of years back as my first foray into electric. Unfortunately for me, I might as well have strapped strings across a 2x4. It was a very fine instrument- it just didn't work for me. I got rid of it and have since replaced it with an Epi Les Paul. For me, I relate to the feel, sound and vibe of the instrument, and it does what I want it to do. Go out and play a bunch, you'll find the "right" one for you. Or at least the "right now" guitar for you . . . until you begin your search for the next "perfect" one!! ;) Good luck.

LPPlayer
12-22-2006, 11:02 PM
I have been the rhythm guitar player for the last 20+ years. A lot of good opinions already suggested.....here is mine after 50 plus guitars over the years.....

Best overall - Les Paul
Best purely rhythm - Gretsch 6120 (finding a good one takes patience)
Best strat style - "super-strat" maybe a Grosh or Anderson
A nice tele covers a lot of ground
If you get to have more than 1 - get a Ricky 12 string - they are a blast to play for some of the old "classic rock" songs and also get a nice acoustic electric ( I personally don't like them - but ya gotta have one) !!

and of equal importance - get a nice amp that matches your guitar and playing style !!

Bern
12-22-2006, 11:55 PM
When I was playing in bands in the '60s & '70s I've always felt comfortable with Gretch and Rickenbacker guitars. Gibsons, I've found to be hard to tame for rhythm, but that might have been just me. :)

Rich
12-23-2006, 07:43 AM
I have a Korean made Epiphone Casino which sounds great for rythym playing.

jonesbrass
12-23-2006, 08:53 AM
One other thing that is vital in the "perfect rhythm guitar" setup is the amp- not only picking the right instrument for you, but also the right amp to match the sounds in your head.