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View Full Version : Vintage Giannini Value


txmulletrocker
03-09-2011, 09:08 AM
I have an opportunity to purchase a 1960s Giannini with BRZ RW back and sides, but the purchase is very time sensitive (I'm out of town on vacation) and I can't find ANYTHING about these in my searches and reading. Does anyone have any idea if they are quality instruments, and how much they are worth in good condition?

The idea of a nylon string guitar is very new to me, and I don't know all that much about them, but this seems like a really cool opportunity. I know back in the '60s BRZ wasn't as rare of a material and I just don't want to get ripped off, or wind up with a hunk of junk.

ALSO, I know that posting prices is paramount to insulting someone's mother around here, so PLEASE don't post actual values in your replys. I would very much appreciate a PM.

RP
03-09-2011, 09:30 AM
I'd suggest checking completed Ebay sales to get an idea as to what they fetch.

guto
03-09-2011, 10:25 AM
Do you have any more info about the guitar?
The actual model of the guitar would help.

I bet prices differ a lot between here in Brazil and everywhere else, but this guitars are usually valued for being the "sound of bossa-nova".
They usually have that soft, sweet sound.
Not loud at all.
The chords usually mix well.
Note separation is not a strong point.

I would not recomend one if you are going to play classical or demand a "concert" (like in been able to be heard without amplification) guitar, but if you are into bossa nova, they MAY BE as good as it gets, cause they have MAY have that unique kind of sound.

cpmusic
03-09-2011, 01:56 PM
Giannini classicals were very popular during the Great Folk Music Scare. I don't know if it was due to quality or availability, but I suspect the latter based on the ones I remember from the 60s. As always, it's important to play the guitar if you can, and don't let the Brazilian rosewood bowl you over. Brazilian is good stuff, but it won't make a weak guitar sound good or increase its value.

The Giannini name was revived recently, but I don't think it has much to do with the original.

Dogsnax
03-09-2011, 02:30 PM
Do you have any more info about the guitar?
The actual model of the guitar would help.

I bet prices differ a lot between here in Brazil and everywhere else, but this guitars are usually valued for being the "sound of bossa-nova".
They usually have that soft, sweet sound.
Not loud at all.
The chords usually mix well.
Note separation is not a strong point.

I would not recomend one if you are going to play classical or demand a "concert" (like in been able to be heard without amplification) guitar, but if you are into bossa nova, they MAY BE as good as it gets, cause they have MAY have that unique kind of sound.

Trust Guto on this one....Giannini guitars are made in his native Brasil.

gltr
03-09-2011, 11:21 PM
I would not get hung up on the brasilian rosewoods used on these guitars as a determining factor of value. Perhaps Guto can shed more light on the subject but my understanding is that Di Giorgio guitars were the defining instruments of the Bossa Nova movement.
Check this site for info on Bossanova guitars:
http://guitar.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?zi=1/XJ/Ya&sdn=guitar&zu=http%3A%2F%2Fspazioinwind.libero.it%2Fbossanova %2Findex.htm

txmulletrocker
03-10-2011, 04:07 AM
It's a 1965 522.

I'm actually looking for a guitar to fit a specific purpose. I lead worship from my steel string, but I travel constantly for work. Often times I spend a week or two away from home, and I want something to take with me on the plane so that I can learn new music and stay fresh while I'm on the road. I thought a nylon would work well because it's a bit quieter and would be good for playing in my hotel room. I had also played with the idea of throwing a little pickup in it and rotating it into my worship set; especially for intimate alter times.

brad4d8
03-10-2011, 08:57 AM
What I remember of Giannini's from that period is that they were generally ok players with varied sound qualities. They made several levels from entry to probably intermediate, their most popular models were probably the craviolas. I have one of their newer models (GWNC1/7 -seven string) and it is a very nice entry level nylon string guitar.
Brad

guto
03-11-2011, 06:34 AM
As always, it's important to play the guitar if you can, and don't let the Brazilian rosewood bowl you over. Brazilian is good stuff, but it won't make a weak guitar sound good or increase its value.

The Giannini name was revived recently, but I don't think it has much to do with the original.
Dead on! Brazilian rosewood wonít work miracles and it was used a lot in that time.

Maybe they were not very popular outside Brazil for some time, but Giannini was always a strong brand in here, they still are today, but the quality really dropped a lot because of the Chinese imports being so cheap.

I would not get hung up on the brasilian rosewoods used on these guitars as a determining factor of value. Perhaps Guto can shed more light on the subject but my understanding is that Di Giorgio guitars were the defining instruments of the Bossa Nova movement.
Check this site for info on Bossanova guitars:
http://guitar.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?zi=1/XJ/Ya&sdn=guitar&zu=http%3A%2F%2Fspazioinwind.libero.it%2Fbossanova %2Findex.htm

Yes, Di Giorgios are more valued then Gianninis from the bossa nova "era".
Most famous bossa nova players played Di Giorgios, but in fact Giannini was producing more instruments/month then Di Giorgio at the time. So they must be more available then Di Giorgios.
And as Romeo Di Giorgio started working on Giannini in his early days (if I remember correctly), they have a lot in common too, at least in that time.
From more recent past, Gianninis are even more valued then Di Giorgios, as some great luthiers worked there and then started to build alone.
A Giannini C7 made by Sergio Abreu, for instance, is a very valued guitar today.

As a curiosity, my godmother has a late 20ís Giannini, which apparently belonged to a famous guitar player called Canhoto, in his time.
I played it some time ago, and although itís not a ďconcertĒ guitar, for its volume and projection, it was a great playing guitar, with a really great vintage tone.
It was Spruce and Brazilian Rosewood, all solid. It was probably between their top models at the time.

Trust Guto on this one....Giannini guitars are made in his native Brasil.
Lol, thanks, but Iím no bossa nova expert. I actually donít like it. ;)

It's a 1965 522.

I'm actually looking for a guitar to fit a specific purpose. I lead worship from my steel string, but I travel constantly for work. Often times I spend a week or two away from home, and I want something to take with me on the plane so that I can learn new music and stay fresh while I'm on the road. I thought a nylon would work well because it's a bit quieter and would be good for playing in my hotel room. I had also played with the idea of throwing a little pickup in it and rotating it into my worship set; especially for intimate alter times.
Well, Giannini has a part in their site for the older models and catalogues, but this model is missing.
I found pictures of the guitar in a Brazilain forum, but no price: http://img340.imageshack.us/slideshow/webplayer.php?id=dsc02491i.jpg
Is that the same?

Playability may be an issue for an old guitar. You should definitely play it before buying, in my opinion.:guitar:

riorider
03-11-2011, 07:47 AM
Lots more relevant experience, but I can say my wife had a Giannini classical that her first husband had hand picked for her. It was covered in finish cracks (they lived in Denver) but had exceptional wood, was very playable, and was a great guitar. He was a young, brilliant, incredibly talented young man who died of cancer at 21, but his expertise in guitars leads me to think this was a very deliberate decision.

The guitar was stolen from us in '83, but I can still recall it very clearly. The only Giannini I've since seen was a flat top in a pawn shop several years ago - back and sides intact but the top was caved in and needed rebuilding.

So, sorry for no help on the value, but I do have very positive thoughts about the brand.

Best of luck,

Phil